In Ted’s Own Words

Spring bearseason has kickedoff to a blazing start with hunters all across North America killing black bears & griz in record numbers! This is my spring QB blackie from 2013. Our SUNRIZE SAFARIS 517-750-9060 books hunters all over the world at the best damn outfits there is. If you’ve never hunted your own rugsteaks ya oughtta git krackin! KillerFUN & powerful perfect conservation. That’s why there are more bears in NA now than ever in recorded history. Bow, gun, ballpeen hammer, Bowie knife, heavy sox with an 8ball! Don’t matter! Let’s killem!! CMON!!
Photo: Spring bearseason has kickedoff to a blazing start with hunters all across North America killing black bears & griz in record numbers! This is my spring QB blackie from 2013. Our SUNRIZE SAFARIS 517-750-9060 books hunters all over the world at the best damn outfits there is. If you've never hunted your own rugsteaks ya oughtta git krackin! KillerFUN & powerful perfect conservation. That's why there are more bears in NA now than ever in recorded history. Bow, gun, ballpeen hammer, Bowie knife, heavy sox with an 8ball! Don't matter! Let's killem!! CMON!!

A Field Guide to the North American Hunter

People tend to paint all wildlife-killers with a single brush stroke, referring to them all simply as “hunters.” Yet close scientific observation reveals that there are at least five different categories, or sub-species, of the mutation of Homo sapiens known as the North American hunter (Homo hunter horribilis). Oddly, members of some sub-species don’t like to be associated with others. They can’t all be bad apples, can they? Read on…

1) Sport Hunter

This category can actually be applied to all the other sub-species, including theimagesD5ZT7PC1 universally maligned trophy hunter, as well as the so-called subsistence hunter, since nearly no one in this day and age really has to kill wild animals to survive anymore. Lately we’ve been hearing from a lot of hunter apologists quick to make a distinction between sport and subsistence hunters. Truth is there’s not all that much difference between the two. Sport hunters and subsistence hunters are often so closely related, they’re practically kissin’ cousins. Rare is the hunter who doesn’t justify his sport by boasting about “using the meat.” By the same token, you hardly ever find one who openly admits to being just a sport hunter.

But, being by far the largest sub-class, there are obviously plenty of adherents. For reasons known only to them, they like to refer to themselves as “sportsmen” (or “sportswomen”). When not out killing, they are often seen petitioning Congress to enshrine their perceived right to kill animals (meanwhile mocking the very notion that non-human animals have rights).

Tracks: On the rare occasion that these good ol’ boy traditional sport hunters get out of their vehicles (usually a pickup truck with a bench seat, so they can sit on their camo-clad asses three abreast), you’ll find their tell-tale boot tracks weaving along the roadway—a sure sign the Schmidt-swilling hunter has spotted a deer, or needs to take a pee.

Other spoor to watch for: spent shotgun shells and cigarette butts in parking lots, or 16 ounce beer cans and empty fried pork rind bags ejected out the truck window, along forest roadways.

 

2) Subsistence Hunters

10478663_666186560097028_1055574252307234730_nThis category includes the holier than hemp types who use words like “foodie,” and all those others who claim to hunt mainly for food. Subsistence types conveniently ignore the fact that there are 7 billion human meat-eaters on the planet today, and if they all followed their model for “living off the land,” there would be no wildlife left on Earth.

Like sport hunters, subsistence hunters do what they do because they want to; they enjoy the “outdoor lifestyle.” But not many self-proclaimed “subsistence” hunters are willing to give up modern conveniences—their warm house, their car, cable TV or the ever-present and attendant “reality” film crew—and live completely off the land like a Neanderthal…at least not indefinitely.

While everyone has a right to feed themselves and their family, what gives them the right to exploit the wildlife is unclear. Sure, all people need some form of protein, yet millions have found a satisfying and healthful way to eat that doesn’t involve preying on others. And they don’t seem to understand that dead is dead and it doesn’t matter to the victim whether their killer eats every part of them or just sticks their head on a wall.

Call: Often overheard uttering feeble catch-words like “management,” “sustainability,” “population control” or “invasive species.” Unfortunately, they never think to apply those same concepts to the species, Homo sapiens.

 

3) Trophy Hunters   

This group can be confused with other “sportsmen,” but though both types are clearly in1383480_10151726970777825_1974489269_n it for the fun, trophy hunters are obsessed with every aspect of the so-called sport. These are the kind of people who hold “contest hunts” on anything seen as competition, yet ironically are intent on recruiting more hunters, including women and young people, encouraging them to take up the “sport.” Although their professed enemies are predators like wolves and mountain lions, their most dreaded foe are the anti-hunters.

The trophy hunters’ fixation with horn curl or antler spread is in fact causing a reversal of evolution in the species whose heads they covet.

Breeding plumage: Camouflage from head to tail; flashy orange vest. Mates primarily with themselves.

 

4) Sadists  

1384140_564330240283396_857016214_nThis category includes bow-hunters, trappers and wolf hunters. Often seen on reality T.V.  shows or in homemade snuff-film videos on U-Tube. Hunters who consider themselves in one of the other categories would do well to self-police their kind, lest normal people (non-hunters) think all hunters are sadists who enjoy the act of killing and are turned on by watching animals suffer and struggle under their power.

Habitat: Disgusting personal websites or Facebook pages where they parade around in camo, showing off their evil deeds for anyone who’ll give them the time of day.

 

5) “Ethical” Hunters

This is the category that virtually all hunters want to be included in. Unfortunately, the phrase “ethical hunter” is an oxymoron, like “humane slaughter,” “virgin mother,” “fair chase,” “free-range poultry” or “friendly neighborhood serial killer.” As withSmalfut UFOs, Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster, no one has ever been able to locate one of these mythical phantoms.

Spoor: This make-believe subspecies leaves no tracks or scat because, well, they’re fictitious. The only impression they make is in the minds of the easily influenced. There’s simply no way an animal-killer can be considered ethical, unless of course he gives up hunting.

Great News for Elk: Hunting Nixed in Ecola Creek reserve

Photo  Jim Robertson

Photo Jim Robertson

By Nancy McCarthy
The Daily Astorian

CANNON BEACH — Hunting will no longer be allowed in the Ecola Creek Forest Reserve.

The Cannon Beach City Council decided Tuesday night to discontinue hunting on the north side of the city-owned 1,040-acre parcel in the Ecola Creek Watershed. The vote was 4-1, with councilors Mike Benefield, George Vetter and Melissa Cadwallader and Mayor Mike Morgan supporting a motion to ban hunting. Wendy Higgins, who said the council should fulfill its commitment to allow hunting for five years, opposed the motion.

Although the council had agreed in 2012 to allow bowhunting, and in 2013 to allow shotgun hunting in the reserve for five years, several councilors said they wanted to reconsider the decision. They pointed out that only five hunters – none of them Cannon Beach residents – had hunted in the area in the past two years.

“I did vote for the bond measure (providing $4 million for the Ecola reserve); I like to hike; I’m not a hunter, although I don’t have opposition to people who are hunters; and I definitely agree that hunting does not fit the definition of passive recreation,” said Councilor Mike Benefield.

Noting that a majority of those responding to a survey conducted when the reserve was initially proposed said they didn’t want hunting and wanted to allow only “passive recreation” in the area, Benefield called the idea of hunting “intimidating.” Benefield, who was appointed to the council to fill a vacancy several months ago, didn’t originally vote to allow hunting.

“I think the City Council made a mistake allowing hunting on the property, and I will vote to eliminate it,” Benefield said.

Morgan called it a “contentious issue” in the community.

“I think it’s barely worth the effort,” said Mayor Mike Morgan. “I think it’s time to end it.

“We’ve had only five hunters,” he added. “For all the angst and anxiety this has caused in this community, I don’t think it’s worth it.”

Those in the audience who supported hunting said they would have hunted in the reserve, but they weren’t able to acquire a tag from the Oregon Department and Fish and Wildlife, which issues tags on a lottery basis. However, the tags aren’t specifically for the Ecola Reserve but for all 800 square miles of the Saddle Mountain Unit, where hunting is allowed.

They also said the fee the city charged was a deterrent. The city charged $200 for a hunting permit during the first year and $50 last year.

“Why are you discussing this today when you agreed hunting would be allowed for five years?” asked Troy Laws, a hunter from Seaside. “It’s a matter of integrity.”

Despite hikers’ fears of potential harm when hunters are in the reserve, no problems have occurred so far, said Herman Bierdebeck, ODFW wildlife biologist. Bierdebeck said land where hunting has been allowed for generations – including the Ecola Forest Reserve before the city acquired it from the state Department of Forestry – is increasingly being removed from hunters’ access.

“You can continue this experiment,” he told the council. “There haven’t been any problems that we’re aware of, so why not let it continue?

Councilor Melissa Cadwallader, who opposed hunting in the reserve when the council originally approved it, noted that the reserve was a “very small piece of land” in the Saddle Mountain Unit. She pointed out that the city-approved management plan for the reserve provides for “adaptive management” that allows policy adjustments for the reserve’s management if changes occur.

“The surveys are not in favor of hunting, and the bond measure approving the creation of the reserve calls for passive recreation,” Cadwallader said. “I thought we had defined it.”

Although Councilor George Vetter suggested that the council consider adding a “sunset” clause allowing hunting for another year, no motion was made, and it wasn’t considered.

I’d Love to Change the World

I’ve been told that I’m not helping anything by being vegan; that I wasn’t going to be able to stop all the horrible things going on by taking a stand against animal consumption.

10151358_495324630593354_7512005859880238928_nThat’s a depressing thought, especially if you’re aware of the current holocaust happening all around us. Humans are slaughtering 6 million animals per hour. 20,000 more will die in the time it takes you to read these sentences! That’s a holocaust of farmed animals every 60 minutes. And that’s not counting fish, lobsters, shrimp, oysters, clams, krill or other sea life. But I’m not fooling myself, I know it would take a concerted, allied effort to stop these atrocities.

Even if I never saw positive results from promoting veganism in my short lifetime, there are other reasons for not eating animals. For me, veganism is about choosing not to add to the suffering our fellow Earthlings endure every day for the human appetite; it’s a form of dissent against the extreme cruelty millions of animals undergo so humans can have their steak and eat it too.

Veganism is my protest against the insanity of factory farming; against the existence of battery cages, cattle feedlots, industrialized dairies, veal crates, hog farming, commercial fishing, whaling, sealing, fur trapping, bow hunting, predator control, contest hunts, culling, derby killing and every other form of exploitation our species inflicts on the non-humans citizens of the world.

I might not be able to change the world, but at least I don’t have to be complicit in institutionalized animal cruelty. Non-human animals might hold little value to most people, but the laissez-faire acceptance of brutality and suffering will eventually come back on Homo sapiens and help facilitate the demise of the species.

In the immortal words of Woodstock headliners, Ten Years After:

“I’d love to change the world

But I don’t know what to do

So I’ll leave it up to you”

why

Arrow removed from NJ bear shot in face, mouth

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2014/05/nj_vet_removes_arrow_from_bear_that_was_shot_in_face_mouth.html

By Jeff Goldman/The Star-Ledger The Star-Ledger

MINE HILL — A New Jersey black bear that remarkably survived the winter with an arrow in its face and mouth has a new lease on life.

With assistance from the state Division of Fish and Wildlife and several technicians, a Mine Hill veterinarian removed the projectile from the approximately 3-year-old bear on Thursday evening, hours after it was caught by officials.

“We’ve never seen anything quite like that,” said Dr. Steven Hodes, who performed the surgery at about 7 p.m. in the parking lot of the Hodes Veterinary Group on Route 46. “Normally when they get shot in the face or head you expect them to die in during the winter. He was fortunate in that he got shot in an area that allowed him to eat and drink.”

The arrow was wedged from the top of the bear’s nose, through its tongue to the bottom portion of its jaw, Department of Environmental Protections spokesman Bob Considine said. The arrow didn’t come out the bottom of the animal’s jaw, though. Officials still aren’t sure how the bear was able to drink because of the way the arrow was positioned.

Fish and Wildlife officials located the bear Thursday afternoon after receiving calls from concerned people who saw it in the area of New Egypt Raceway.

arrow.jpgThe arrow that was lodged in the face and mouth of a black bear.

When technician Kim Tinnes and her team arrived, the bear was gone, though. It was spotted a short time later running across Route 539, at which time officials were able to capture it by shooting it with a tranquilizer dart.

The bear was then brought to Mine Hill and within an hour the arrow had been removed. The bear weighs about 220 pounds, 50 to 70 pounds less than a normal bear of its age.

The man who shot the bear reported it to the Division of Fish and Wildlife. He was issued a summons for attempting to take a bear illegally.

The bear was released this morning into the Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area in Jackson, Considine said.

“It’s very gratifying for us to be able to help,” said Hodes, who has been working with Fish and Wildlife for about three years and performed the surgery for free.

Petitions: Prosecute man who Killed Cat with BOW for fun in Australia!

You might be thinking, who the hell hunts cats or dogs? Well, just yesterday I received a comment from someone who started off, “I already ate a dog, I love dog fights, blood,…” etc., etc., blah blah blah.

There are plenty of psychopaths out there; it’s up to us to put laws in place to keep them in their place (hell preferably).

Please sign these two petitions for domestic animals, one against cat hunting and one on to  Prevent cruelty to dogs and cats in China: http://www.change.org/petitions/prevent-cruelty-to-dogs-and-cats-in-china-2?share_id=ACCyzOYrFC&utm_campaign=friend_inviter_chat&utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=share_petition&utm_term=permissions_dialog_true

And: https://www.yousign.org/en/cat-bow-australia

Prosecute Australian man that KILLS Cats with BOWS AND ARROWS! Sign here for justice: https://www.yousign.org/en/cat-bow-Australia
Petition text: Tyler Atkinson form Ballarat, Victoria in Australia boasts online and in hunting forums about killing cats with his prized possession, a professional hunting bow. He even posted pictures of his deeds, a good thing because we can use it as evidence!He said: “Got my first feral cat this morning.Called him into about 3 meters after spotting him sniffing around about 50 meters away, and put a supreme on track and he was mine inside 6m”We urge the Chief Police Commissioner to start an investigation and prevent any other innocent animals from being killed by this man. – See more at: https://www.yousign.org/en/cat-bow-australia#sthash.xWFWv1og.dpuf

 

Elizabeth deer bow hunting plan drawing fire from opponents

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/elizabeth-deer-bow-hunting-plan-drawing-fire-from-opponents

by Russell Haythorn

ELIZABETH, Colo. – The Town of Elizabeth is considering allowing crossbow hunting of deer, but the plan is drawing fire from opponents..

Norma Emerson is a big fan of the deer that roam her yard almost every day. One even gave birth in her backyard last year.

“We love living here because of the wildlife out here,” she said.

Emerson is not a fan of the town’s proposal to thin the herd by allowing a limited bow hunt within town limits.

“I believe it is a very bad plan,” she said.

But town administrators say complaints are on the rise and the deer population is out of control. The animals are causing more crashes, damaging more yards and attracting predatory animals like mountain lions.

If the bow hunt plan moves forward, Town Manager Dick Eason says it will be selective.

“Highly qualified and skilled bow hunters in a very well defined geographic area,” he explained.

“We can work very closely with the town and vet how many, what kind of hunters are in there, what their experience is,” said Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokeswoman Jennifer Churchill.

Other options under consideration are sterilization and relocating the herd. If the hunting option is selected, it would likely occur during hunting season.

The town says it will likely be May before a final decision is reached.

Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson, 2014.

Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson, 2014.

New law allows crossbow hunting, but not on LI

http://www.newsday.com/long-island/suffolk/new-law-allows-crossbow-hunting-but-not-on-li-1.7576666

April 1, 2014 7:32 PM
By DAVID M. SCHWARTZ

John Hargreaves, an archer from Farmingville, practices his

Bow hunters on Long Island will be allowed closer to homes — though not with crossbows — under terms of a new law included in the state budget package.

Bow hunters won’t be able to shoot within 150 feet of buildings, a reduction from the 500 feet that had been on the books, state officials said Tuesday.

The new law gives hunters access to more land, lawmakers and hunters said, and could help to reduce a deer herd that Eastern Long Island residents said has grown too large.



 

“It opens up a lot of areas to hunting that can’t be hunted now,” said Assemblyman Fred Thiele Jr. (I-Sag Harbor). “That’s what my local governments and people were telling me they wanted.”

Property owners must give hunters permission to be on their land.

Wildlife advocates said the change was bad for both deer and humans. “It’s cruel for the deer and dangerous for humans,” said Bill Crain, president of East Hampton Group for Wildlife. He said bow hunting can lead to slow deaths for deer.

“A hundred and fifty feet — that’s awfully close. You could be in somebody’s yard where children are playing,” Crain said.

Hunters and local officials have advocated for easing hunting restrictions to help deal with the herd of 25,000 to 35,000 deer in Suffolk. The population has grown so large that the Long Island Farm Bureau entered into a controversial agreement with sharpshooters from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to cull deer in late February.

Cuomo’s proposed budget that he originally submitted included easing the distance restrictions, as well as allowing for crossbows to be used in hunts — which elderly and disabled hunters had sought.

The eventual budget bill allows crossbows to be used upstate, but not in Suffolk or Westchester counties. Deer hunting is not allowed in Nassau County. Thiele said the crossbows weren’t a focus of his efforts, and faced some opposition on Long Island.

Some hunters were disappointed that crossbow hunting won’t be allowed on Long Island.

John Blanco, 68, of Manorville, said he has been too weak to pull back a bow since he began fighting cancer in 1997.

“If you let the senior citizens or disabled people get crossbows,” Blanco said, “there’d be no need for the culling they have going on.”

Crossbows can be easier to cock than bows, which can require more upper body strength.

Allowing crossbows and easing the setback restrictions were recommended in the state Department of Environmental Conservation’s Deer Management Plan, released in 2011.

“Archery shots taken at deer are typically discharged either on a horizontal plane or on a downward trajectory,” according to the report.”In these situations, an arrow travels only a short distance before either hitting the target or dropping to the ground.”

In the past 10 years, the report said, “the only reported injuries in New York State related to handling or discharge of bow-hunting equipment were 2 self-inflicted cuts from careless handling of arrows.” The 500 foot restriction on firearm hunting, which is only allowed during limited times in January in Suffolk, are unchanged.

Thiele had introduced a similar bill last year, but the bill did not make it out of the Environmental Conservation Committee, which is chaired by Assemb. Robert Sweeney (D-Lindenhurst).

“I’m comfortable,” Sweeney said Tuesday. “One hundred and fifty feet is more than adequate to keep people safe.”

Ted Nugent Was Paid $16,000 NOT to Appear At Local Event

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/21/ted-nugent-appearance-canceled_n_5009248.html

This Town Paid Ted Nugent $16,000 To NOT Appear At A Local Event
The Huffington Post | by Paige Lavender 03/21/2014

Ted Nugent just made big bucks to not show up somewhere.

The town of Longview, Texas paid Nugent $16,000 to not appear at the town’s Fourth of July Festival. According to KLTV, a city spokesman said Nugent was “not the right feel for this kind of community event.”

The city had reached a verbal agreement with Nugent, scheduling the rocker as the headliner who would play inside the Maude Cobb Convention and Activity Center during the town’s Independence Day celebration. To break that agreement, the town paid Nugent half of his guaranteed performance fee of $32,000 from Maude Cobb’s annual budget.

The move comes amid criticism of comments Nugent made about President Barack Obama in January 2014, calling him a “subhuman mongrel.” Nugent, who campaigned with Texas Attorney General and gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott amid the controversy, apologized for those comments in February.

Abbott said he was moving on from the controversy over Nugent in late February, but his ties to the rocker remain a prominent talking point of both sides of the governor’s race. Abbott’s rival, Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis (D), called the Attorney General’s embrace of Nugent an “insult,” while former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin (R) cited the rocker in her endorsement of Abbott.

“If he is good enough for Ted Nugent, he is good enough for me!” Palin wrote on her Facebook page.

The situation with Longview is not unique. Nugent was removed from a concert lineup at a prominent military base in 2012 after saying he would be “dead or in jail by this time next year” if Obama were re-elected that year.

68439_10151399495155861_1116657731_n  30973_4756818474045_484772904_n

Stop the Crossbow Insanity in New York

This action alert from IDA answers to an disallowed comment from someone claiming to have “…a natural areas management background” (who must not have read this blogs “About” page wherein it is stated that pro-hunting comments will not be approved), “We also cull many deer here. But, we don’t make big anouncements about it. They cause many car related accidents and this is really the only way to handle them. The upside is the meat doesn’t go to waste, but to a food kitchen.” (I’m sure the deer appreciate knowing that.)

https://secure2.convio.net/ida/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=2563&autologin=true#.UvQPwp8EwLk.facebook

(Valid address is required – P.O. Boxes cannot be used)

In Defense of Animals

Oppose Legalizing Crossbows and Changing the Minimum Distance Requirement for Killing Wildlife from Occupied Dwellings

What’s next… throwing spears out of car windows to kill wildlife for fun?

We need your help to stop a proposal in New York that would legalize the use of crossbows. For bow hunting, it would also lower the current 500 foot minimum shooting distance from a home or occupied structure down to the outrageously dangerous distance of only 150 feet in order to further accommodate bow hunters.

There is a notable trend in relaxing crossbow hunting regulations across the nation, mainly in an effort to stem declining hunter numbers, by increasing hunting opportunities.

A current example is New York’s Governor Andrew Cuomo, who wants to legalize hunting with crossbows to kill deer and bears, and allow the use of crossbows just 150 feet from homes and other buildings.

Crossbows are short-range, lethal weapons from which the projectile is released by squeezing a trigger, rather than by manually releasing the string as with a longbow. They are essentially guns that shoot powerful arrows and weapons which appeal to inexperienced hunters.

What you can do:Send the letter below to the leaders of the New York Assembly and the Senate and Governor Cuomo and request that they amend Governor Cuomo’s proposed budget bill by deleting section I.

Personalize and submit the form below to email your comments to:

  • Governor Andrew Cuomo
  • Senator Dean Skelos
  • Senator Jeffrey Klein
  • Speaker Sheldon Silver

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No Crossbow Hunting and No Bow Hunting Distance Reductions

Dear [Decision Maker],

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As a supporter of In Defense of Animals (IDA) and an avid advocate for wildlife, and the safety of people, I am requesting that you amend Governor Cuomo’s proposed budget bill by deleting section I.

Governor Cuomo’s proposal seeks to legalize crossbows for hunting and allow their use at 150 feet from occupied buildings, while also limiting the liability for landowners who want to turn their property into killing grounds. This means that crossbows could be used near areas with high human traffic and activity homes and backyards with children, golf courses, parking lots, student housing, well-traveled roads and public trails, and parks where families spend time and walk their animal companions.

Hunting with crossbows is currently illegal in New York and limited in many other states for good reason; crossbows are inherently more dangerous than other types of hunting weapons. Crossbows require much less skill than compound, long, or recurve bows, which makes them attractive to inexperienced hunters, including children and teenagers.

The wounding rate of deer by bow hunters is already over 50%, which means that more than half of deer are shot but never retrieved by hunters. These animals suffer a prolonged and painful death, which is a direct violation of the “quick death” required by the code of ethics that so-called “sportsmen” claim to adhere to.

Governor Cuomo’s proposal is in line with a dangerous trend to relax bow hunting regulations nationwide to increase hunter recruitment and retention, at the expense of the safety of the non-hunting community, including many of your constituents.

Jeopardizing the safety of the majority of people in order to satisfy a minority of “sportsmen” is unacceptable. New Yorkers have the right to be safe and Governor Cuomo’s proposal should be rejected.

Sincerely, [Your Name] [Your Address] [City, State ZIP]