Who Should Read Exposing the Big Game?

Imagine you’re a hunter and you just bought a copy of Exposing the Big Game to add to your collection of books and magazines featuring photos of prize bull elk, beefy bison and scary bears (the kind of animals you objectify and fantasize about one day hanging in your trophy room full of severed heads). This one also includes pictures of “lesser” creatures like prairie dogs and coyotes you find plain ol’ fun to trap or shoot at.

You don’t normally read these books (you’re too busy drooling over the four-legged eye candy to be bothered), but for some reason this one’s burning a hole in your coffee table. So you take a deep breath and summon up the courage to contemplate the text and its meaning. Several of the words are big and beyond you, and you wish you had a dictionary, but eventually you begin to figure out that Exposing the Big Game is more than just a bunch of exposed film featuring the wild animals you think of as “game.”

This book actually has a message and the message is: hunting sucks!

You don’t want to believe it—the notion that animals are individuals rather than resources goes against everything you’ve ever accepted as truth. But reading on, you learn about the lives of those you’ve always conveniently depersonalized. Finally it starts to dawn on you that animals, such as those gazing up at you from these pages, are fellow earthlings with thoughts and feelings of their own. By the time you’ve finished the third chapter your mind is made up to value them for who they are, not what they are. Now your life is changed forever!

Suddenly you’re enlightened and, like the Grinch, your tiny heart grows three sizes that day. The war is over and you realize that the animals were never the enemy after all. You spring up from the sofa, march over to the gun cabinet and grab your rifles, shotguns, traps, bows and arrows. Hauling the whole cache out to the chopping block, you smash the armaments to bits with your splitting maul. Next, you gather up your ammo, orange vest and camouflage outfits and dump ‘em down the outhouse hole.

Returning to the book, you now face the animals with a clearer conscience, vowing never to harm them again. You’re determined to educate your hunter friends with your newfound revelations and rush out to buy them all copies of Exposing the Big Game for Christmas…

Or suppose you are a non-hunter, which, considering the national average and the fact that the percentage of hunters is dropping daily, is more than likely. Avid hunters comprise less than 5 percent of Americans, while you non-hunters make up approximately 90 percent, and altruistically avid anti-hunters represent an additional 5 percent of the population. For you, this book will shed new light on the evils of sport hunting, incite outrage and spark a firm resolve to help counter these atrocities.

And if you’re one of the magnanimous 5 percent—to whom this book is dedicated—who have devoted your very existence to advocating for justice by challenging society’s pervasive double standard regarding the value of human versus nonhuman life, the photos of animals at peace in the wild will provide a much needed break from the stress and sadness that living with your eyes open can sometimes bring on. As a special treat cooked up just for your enjoyment, a steaming cauldron of scalding satire ladled lavishly about will serve as chik’n soup for your anti-hunter’s soul.

So, who should read Exposing the Big Game? Any hunter who hasn’t smashed his weapons with a splitting maul…or any non-hunter who isn’t yet comfortable taking a stand as an anti-hunter. The rest of you can sit back and enjoy the pretty pictures.

______________________________________________________________

The preceding was an excerpt from the book, Exposing the Big Game: Living Targets of a Dying Sport.

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Welcome to Hell, Coyote Hunters

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Hundreds of killing contests have taken place all over the USA…Here is a description of a killing contest that just happened in Michigan — This pic and the description are on a public forum.

What is a “tagged coyote”? A tagged coyote is one that was previously trapped, marked in some way and then released, and killed for a prize.

“Just a few weeks ago the “Call of the Wild” Predator Round Up was held near our cabin in Luzerne Michigan. The hunt began at 7:00 p.m. Friday night and ran till 12 noon Sunday. Seventy three (73) hunters signed up comprising 33 different teams. Several teams used coyote dogs and others worked various “sets” while calling. The hunters with the dogs had the advantage, but the first “yote” turned in was by a father and son team who called the 29.7 pound female within range of a flat shooting 223″ …..
“Ma Deeters (local bar/restaurant) was the starting point of the hunt, and the Best Hardware store was where the successful hunters displayed their success. There were around $1700.00 dollars in prizes with anyone bringing in a tagged coyote receiving a $1000.00 dollar bonus. Knight and Hale (game calls) donated many of the prizes handed out. First coyote, biggest, (41 pounds) ugliest, and longest awards were all given out at the culmination of the hunt. Two of the dog teams garnered most of the awards.
On Sunday afternoon there were eleven (11) coyote and one fox hanging on the game pole at the hardware store. There was an additional prize to any team that brought in the “trifecta” of predator hunting (a coyote, fox, and bobcat.) No one collected that award this year, but one team came close.”

Interview With Project Coyote: Compassionate Coexistence with Predators

Compassionate Coexistence with Predators

March 3, 2014

Hosted by Eli Weiss

Camilla H. Fox
Dr. Robert Crabtree

Episode Description

Coexisting with America’s Song Dog, with Camilla Fox and Robert Crabtree America’s Song Dog, the Trickster, of mythological status to Native Americans; Clever and intelligent, they are critical players in ecosystem health, yet they are the most persecuted. Today I welcome guest experts from Project Coyote: Camilla Fox, Founder and Executive Director and Dr. Robert Crabtree, Scientific Advisory Board member. We learn from Fox and Crabtree why our model of predator management in the form of “coyote killing contests’ and extreme exploitation is not, and will not work- particularly for our Wile E Coyote. We continue hot on the heels unveiling the barbaric practices of our USDA’s secretive killing agency ‘Wildlife Services’, using our tax dollars, on public and private land, to indiscriminately and overkill our wildlife, especially the carnivores – coyotes, wolves, bobcats, and other animals under the mantel of managing human-carnivore conflict toward agricultural and livestock interests.

Listen here: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/76154/compassionate-coexistence-with-predators

How Wolves “Change Rivers”

You may have seen this already. I decided to go ahead and post this video, even though I don’t agree with everything it suggests. For instance, it states that wolves kill coyotes, implying that, as a result, there are now lots of rabbits in Yellowstone. I’ve seen many cases of wolves getting along famously with coyotes there, and yet I haven’t noticed any real increase in rabbits (which wolves would prey on themselves, if rabbits were becoming so numerous). In many ways this is an important and effective video; I’m just saying at times it’s kind of overstated .

http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/02/16/this-will-shatter-your-view-of-apex-predators-how-wolves-change-rivers/

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First the Good News: Wildlife Services’ Plane Crashes

…The bad news? The aerial coyote-killers on board survived.

[True to form, the anthropocentric media makes no mention that while "conducting aerial operations" the Wildlife "Services" agents were shooting coyotes from their plane.]

http://www.sheridancountyjournalstar.net/news/item/2259-crew-members-okay-after-plane-crash

Two crew members with the USDA-Wildlife Services escaped with only bumps and bruises Wednesday, February 12, when their plane, a government owned “Super Cub” crashed south of Gordon.

The pair were returning from western Box Butte County where they had been conducting aerial operations. Approximately nine miles out the plane’s engine started acting up and losing power. They coaxed the plane along until at five miles out the engine quit.

The pilot, Gregg Alan, from Ray, Colorado, was able to land the plane on the highway at which time it was hit with a gust of wind which caused the plane to skid off the road, hitting a power pole and two fence posts before coming to a stop.

Area rancher Paul Simmons saw the accident and gave the two a ride to town. Crew member Randy Benben, of Gordon, was treated at Gordon Memorial for back and hip pain. The plane sustained major damage and the accident is still being investigated by the Aviation Training and Operation Center (ATOC) of Cedar City Utah and the FAA.

Jim Robertson-wolf-copyright

End all use of dogs on wildlife.

Petition to The Wisconsin legislature and Natural Resources Board of Wisconsin: End all use of dogs on wildlife.

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/petition/The_Wisconsin_legislature_and_Natural_Resources_Board_of_Wisconsin_End_all_use_of_dogs_on_wildlife/?fbdm

Posted February 13, 2014

Why this is important

Wisconsin coyotes, wolves, bears, bobcats, raccoons, foxes and all wildlife are being run by packs of dogs and mobs of armed men for killing recreation year-round. Since coyotes can be killed without reporting, any time day or night, statewide, year-round, all wildlife is on the move, terrorized and killed randomly. Dogs used as weapons is cruel to the dogs, wildlife, and to children taught this is fun. Please help us get dogs out of hunting. They are set against trapped animals who cannot defend themselves. No one can defend themselves against armed men and dogs and traps in combination.

Sign the petition here:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/petition/The_Wisconsin_legislature_and_Natural_Resources_Board_of_Wisconsin_End_all_use_of_dogs_on_wildlife/?fbdm

photo Jim Robertson

photo Jim Robertson

TRUE cost of the season’s must have fur-trimmed Canada Goose coat

‘Chilling cruelty, unspeakable suffering and corporate denial’:  the TRUE cost of the season’s must have fur-trimmed Canada Goose coat

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2544075/Revealed-Chilling-cruelty-unspeakable-suffering-corporate-denial-Is-TRUE-cost-seasons-Canada-Goose-coat.html#ixzz2rYM0Ypqk

By Laura Collins  23 January 2014

They have made America their new frontier, forging into the US clothing market to become one of the season’s most recognisable brands with sales of Canada Goose outerwear expected to top $30million this year alone.

In a high profile year in the States, Kate Upton has appeared on the front of Sports Illustrated in one of their fur trimmed, down jackets and nothing much else.

It isn’t the only firm to market such coats, yet Canada Goose has rapidly established itself as the label of choice for the well-known and the well-heeled braving the frigid weather blown in on the polar vortex.

But today MailOnline can reveal that allegations of chilling cruelty and unspeakable animal suffering have been repeatedly levelled at this family business turned multimillion dollar concern.

Scroll down for video

The real cost of a $600 coat: Campaigners claim the coyotes that are trapped and skinned for their fur to trim the hoods of Canada Goose coats can be in pain for days. It is unclear whether these images are from Canada Goose trappers but the firm does use the same leg holds

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The real cost of a $600 coat: Campaigners claim the coyotes that are trapped and skinned for their fur to trim the hoods of Canada Goose coats can be in pain for days. It is unclear whether these images are from Canada Goose trappers but the firm does use the same leg holds

 

Exhausted, alone and all out of fight, this Coyote awaits its inevitable fate having been caught in a trap by its right hind leg

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Exhausted, alone and all out of fight, this Coyote awaits its inevitable fate having been caught in a trap by its right hind leg

 

According to animal rights activists, behind every fur trimmed hood and down stuffed coat is a brutal reality of Coyotes trapped and left to suffer in the wilderness.

Many of today’s ethically aware consumers would never dream of buying a full length fur. But in an  odd quirk of the current trend for this style of garment those same shoppers pull on a coyote trimmed coat without a moment’s concern for the origins of that little flurry of fur.

Lindsay Rajt, Director of Campaigns for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) said:  ‘Canada Goose uses exclusively Coyote fur on the trim of their coats and those animals are trapped in a way that is just inherently cruel.’

As a company founded and grown in Canada, Canada Goose makes much of their support of North Canadian communities in which, their publicity states, Coyote trapping has been ‘a way of life for hundreds of years.’

According to a spokesperson for the firm: ‘The trapping of fur-bearing animals is strictly regulated by the provincial and territorial wildlife departments in Canada.

‘We purchase coyote furs from certified Canadian trappers, never from fur farms or endangered animals.

Kate Upton going 'Polar Bare' on the cover of Sports Illustrated's 2013 Swimsuit edition, wearing a smile, a white Canada Goose parka and not much else

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Kate Upton going ‘Polar Bare’ on the cover of Sports Illustrated’s 2013 Swimsuit edition, wearing a smile, a white Canada Goose parka and not much else

 

 

But PETA has dismissed the standards as ‘window dressing.’

Mr Rajt said: ‘The company’s reference to  AIHTS standards is meaningless and a way of placating and  silencing people with valid concerns.

‘Leg hold traps are still legal in  Canada. Mother animals will chew off their limbs in order to get back to their young. The trapped animal might be there for days before the  trapper comes and finds them, they are frightened and starving and in  pain during that time. And then they’re bludgeoned or strangled to death or shot.’

WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT: Coyotes trapped for their fur

              

A trapped Coyote howls in pain, its right forepaw held tight in the jaws of a leg hold trap - legal under the AIHTS but cruel according to PETA

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A trapped Coyote howls in pain, its right forepaw held tight in the jaws of a leg hold trap – legal under the AIHTS but cruel according to PETA

 

Trapped Coyotes can struggle to get free for days until the hunter returns to check his traps. Mother animals separated from their young attempt to chew off their own limbs in a bid for freedom

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Trapped Coyotes can struggle to get free for days until the hunter returns to check his traps. Mother animals separated from their young attempt to chew off their own limbs in a bid for freedom

 

Ms Rajt revealed that PETA is this week appealing to Canada Goose to abandon their use of fur in favour of synthetic alternatives and to dump their use of real down stuffing.

She said: ‘PETA is reaching out to Canada Goose to urge the company to switch to innovative, synthetic fur like their top competitor Helly Hansen, which has been fur-free for many years.

‘Additionally, we are asking that Canada Goose dump down and opt for revolutionary synthetic technology like the one recently developed by The North Face – Thermoball, which mimics down but offers superior versality.’

Ms Rajt claimed: ‘We have been trying to meet with this company, we’ve been trying to engage with them since 2006.

‘The CEO originally agreed to meet with us in 2008 to discuss trapping  policies and methods but just never confirmed that meeting and then  failed to make himself available to any of our follow ups.

‘It is a challenging company for us to work with.’

Meg Ryan pictured last month in New York's West Village. Canada Goose's concerted effort to win the US market has seen it become a celebrity brand of choice

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Meg Ryan pictured last month in New York’s West Village. Canada Goose’s concerted effort to win the US market has seen it become a celebrity brand of choice

 

Andrew Garfield and girlfriend Emma Stone in their Canada Goose parkas on a shopping trip in New York

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Andrew Garfield and girlfriend Emma Stone in their Canada Goose parkas on a shopping trip in New York

 

Actress Clare Danes wearing her Canada Goose parka with its distinctive Coyote trim while braving the New York chill

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Actress Clare Danes wearing her Canada Goose parka with its distinctive Coyote trim while braving the New York chill

 

But according to a spokesperson for the company: ‘We’ve corresponded with PETA on numerous occasions and it quickly became evident that they were not interested in a constructive conversation.’

Canada Goose was founded in 1957 and has enjoyed remarkable success and rapid growth across the past decade when it started marketing it’s ‘truly Canadian’ ethos to Europe.

 ‘We’ve been trying to engage with this company since 2006…It is a challenging company for us to work with,’
PETA Director of Campaigns, Lindsay Rajt, on Canada Goose’s refusal to meet

Today the company employs more than 1000 people and sells its products in more than 50 countries across the world.

It continues to manufacture its coats in Toronto and Winnipeg but recently opened its first US Headquarters in Denver, Colorado. Last year it became the official sponsor of the Sundance Film Festival and US Equity firm, Bain, recently bought a majority stake in the hitherto entirely Canadian enterprise.

Canada Goose defend their practices

              

Real fur real suffering: Canada Goose President Dani Reese flanked by his company's distinctive outerwear. He says the company uses Coyote fur 'because it works'

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Real fur real suffering: Canada Goose President Dani Reese flanked by his company’s distinctive outerwear. He says the company uses Coyote fur ‘because it works’

 

The extreme weather outerwear is manufactured in Toronto and Winnipeg though US Equity firm, Bain, now owns a majority stakehold

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The extreme weather outerwear is manufactured in Toronto and Winnipeg though US Equity firm, Bain, now owns a majority stakehold

 

Founded in 1957 the family company Canada Goose now employs more than 1000 people and sells its garments in more than 50 countries

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Founded in 1957 the family company Canada Goose now employs more than 1000 people and sells its garments in more than 50 countries

 

Canada Goose President Danni Reiss is very clear in his assessment of the importance of the US market to his brand. He said, ‘The States is a market with one of the greatest potentials in the world. The US is growing faster than the overall company.’

Speaking in a corporate video Mr Reiss explained: ‘We use Coyote fur for a number of reasons. Number one, Coyote fur works – it’s functional, it provides warmth around the face in a way no synthetic fabric can. It does that in the coldest places on earth and it is important to realise that sometimes urban centres and cities can feel like the coldest places on earth.’

Coyote fur doesn’t freeze, doesn’t hold moisture, retains heat and is biodegradable.

Ms Rajt dismissed the necessity of real fur saying: ‘They actually do have some faux fur trim products and there’s a market for that. There’s no reason why they couldn’t switch completely.’

A spokesperson for Canada Goose said: ‘We understand PETA’s concerns and we respect the right of people to choose not to wear fur, however, we know PETA does not respect our ethical, responsible use of fur so further conversation won’t be productive.’

But Ms Rajt insisted: ‘I just don’t believe that  half the people wearing these coats understand what’s really involved in the making of them. And I just don’t believe that they would make that  same choice if it was an informed one.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2544075/Revealed-Chilling-cruelty-unspeakable-suffering-corporate-denial-Is-TRUE-cost-seasons-Canada-Goose-coat.html#ixzz2rYL8KOiR Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Back to the Dark Ages: What’s Next, Bald Eagle Blasting?

The New York Times’ editorial, “Wolf Haters” (December 29, 2013), brought up two prime examples of how anti-wolf fanatics in states like Idaho are trying to drag us back to the dark ages of centuries past, when predators were hunted and trapped to extinction by ignorant people claiming all of nature’s bounty for themselves.

Most Americans nowadays understand natural processes well enough to know that apex species, like wolves, will find equilibrium with their prey if given a chance. Perhaps the only ones who won’t accept that fact are trophy hunters who still claim the elk in Idaho’s wilderness areas as a commodity exclusively for them. It goes beyond the absurd that the US Forest Service would permit a state game department to bring in a bounty hunter because the land is too rugged for the average wolf hunter. To me that seems like the perfect kind of place for predator and prey to return to some semblance of the order that existed before the spread of Manifest Destiny.

I’m sure the enlightened lawmakers who crafted the Endangered Species Act (exactly 40 years ago) never imagined recovering species would be used as targets for some hair-brained “hunters’ rights” groups’ “derby hunt,” as is going on in Salmon, Idaho. Yet this brand of disregard is not without precedence—endangered prairie dogs are routinely targeted by “shooting sports” enthusiasts across the West. What’s next—contest hunts on Yellowstone Bison reminiscent of Buffalo Bill’s reckless era? Or, perhaps a Sunday afternoon of blasting bald eagles?

 

Text and Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson, 2013. All Rights Reserved

Text and Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson, 2013. All Rights Reserved

Salmon residents receive death threats over wolf derby

http://www.localnews8.com/news/salmon-residents-receive-death-threats-over-wolfhunting-contest/-/308662/23616330/-/lin9re/-/index.html

SALMON, Idaho -

Ask any of the people in Salmon and they’ll tell you there’s nothing they like more than a good hunt.

“It is really a way of life,” said Salmon resident Billijo Beck.

But lately that way of life has come under scrutiny after a local outfitter announced a wolf derby in which hunters will be given cash prizes for killing wolves.

Several in the town of 3,000 say they’ve received threatening e-mails and Facebook messages from all over the world.

“There was one that they were gonna hang our entire family by a noose,” recalls Jen Larson, who says she began receiving threats after she and her husband’s diner, the Savage Grill, became a derby sponsor.

“Wanted to burn the business down with us in it. Make sure we were in it,” said Dave Larson.

“Some rock and a flaming arrow needs to fly through that sign,” reads one message, referring to the Savage Grill’s Native American logo.

Another reads, “Sick [expletives] like you need to be removed from the planet. I hope a pack of wolves eviscerates you and leaves your worthless carcass to die slowly, painfully and alone.”

We tracked down one of the people behind one of the threats—a man living in Canada who identified himself as a Native American elder but wouldn’t give his name.

He insists he didn’t cross any line by sending the messages.

“They’re beautiful and you can’t eat the meat. Why do they want to shoot them?” he asked.

But hunters say they’re doing nothing wrong.

“If you look up the definition of murder, it’s defined in human terms. Not in animal terms,” said Beck.

They say the wolf derby will continue despite the negative response.

“It’s mostly out-of-state people who don’t have a clue what we do here or how we live here,” said Dave Larson.

The Lemhi County Sheriff’s Office would not confirm whether they’re investigating the threats.

The wolf derby will take place Dec. 28 and Dec. 29 in Salmon.

Copyright 2013 NPG of Idaho.

copyrighted Hayden wolf in lodgepoles