So Not Like an Elephant

Find and prosecute the cruel men who kicked a squirrel off the edge of the Grand Canyon

Petition byJaya Bhumitra  http://www.change.org/petitions/find-and-prosecute-the-cruel-men-who-kicked-a-squirrel-off-the-edge-of-the-grand-canyon


On August 2, 2014, news outlets reported that two men (French-speaking) lured a squirrel to the edge of the Grand Canyon with treats — only to then cruelly kick the innocent and unassuming creature over the edge. 

At its highest point, the Grand Canyon is 6,000 feet high.

This heinous act was premeditated: the men carefully placed the food in a manner to entrap the squirrel, before one of the men deliberately put on his sneaker in order to punt the squirrrel off the landing.

Not only is this act completely callous to the squirrel who no doubt experienced total terror while finding herself in free fall for thousands of feet and at hundreds of miles per hour before her likely death, but this type of consciously planned animal abuse has been reported as typical sociopathic behavior, which sometimes leads to serial killing (both of non-human and human animals).

The men responsible MUST be found and prosecuted for their actions. No tourist nor American citizen should be permitted to harm an animal in any circumstance, particularly in a national park where the environment and animals in it are officially protected by the state.

Sign the petition now to ask both the National Park Servce and Interpol to find these abusers and bring them to justice!

(YouTube has removed the video due to the disturbing content, though you can see it in this Huffington Post article. Photo credit to YouTube and The Daily Mail article).

Petition to cancel a show that glorifies killing sharks

NBC @NBCSN : Cancel #SharkHunters #sharks

Andrew Mills
Carmel, Indiana

The NBC Sports show Shark Hunters glorifies and promotes the killing of sharks, amazing animals already under pressure from overfishing, finning and environmental pollution. And all three of the species hunted on Shark Hunters are listed as “Vulnerable” by The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN).

The show features three tournaments that give financial prizes for bringing in dead sharks from 3 species: mako, thresher and porbeagle. NBC should not be glamorizing the killing of vulnerable sharks under the pretense of “sport” or “sustainable fishing”.

Programs like this not only glamorize shark hunting and killing but also make the whole action “OK”. Sharks play an important role in our oceans and if we continue to hunt them, our ocean’ss health will continue to decline.

Change.org petitions have successfully convinced other channels, like National Geographic and the Discovery Channel, to cancel other violent hunting shows. I’m sure with enough signatures, we can get NBC to listen.

Please join me in asking NBC and it partners to cancel Shark Hunters!

BREAKING: Facebook removes hunting photos of Texas teen that raised ire

Featured Image -- 6409

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-us-usa-texas-hunting-facebook-20140702,0,2940032.story

Reuters

July 2, 2014

DALLAS (Reuters) – Facebook has removed some photographs of a Texas teenager posing with freshly killed animals she hunted during a recent safari in South Africa that had been criticized by users as inappropriate, the company said on Wednesday.

Kendall Jones, 19, a cheerleader at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, set off a social media storm after she posted a series of photos of animals she killed, smiling in one picture as she hugs a lifeless leopard hanging limply from her arms.

Facebook said some photos were deleted from her page because they violated its policies regarding animal images.

“We remove reported content that promotes poaching of endangered species, the sale of animals for organized fight or content that includes extreme acts of animal abuse,” the company said. It did not provide specific information about the photos removed.

Comre Safaris, a company in South Africa that organizes licensed hunts, said the number of animals killed by Jones fell within a quota set by the country’s wildlife department.

Jones defended her actions, saying in a Facebook post she took inspiration from former U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt, a hunter and conservationist.

“How can it be possible that someone can love the earth, and take from the earth in the name of conservation? For some folks, they’ll never understand. For the rest of us … we were born that way. God Bless Teddy,” Jones said.

But criticism was heavy, with one post branding the hunts barbaric garnering 20,000 comments. More than 130,000 people signed an online petition asking Facebook to remove Jones’ photos, saying they promoted animal cruelty.

“You can see the thrill in her expression and eyes from these photos that she enjoyed the KILLING of these animals,” read one post.

Many cash-strapped African governments allow a small number of big game animals to be killed each year, using the money from the sale of hunting licenses for conservation.

The hunts are held under international guidelines meant to ensure they do not adversely affect overall species numbers.

Animal rights campaigners outraged as Texas cheerleader poses in dozens of photos alongside the rare animals she hunts on African safaris

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2675807/Animal-lover-outrage-blonde-Texas-cheerleader-smiles-dozens-photos-alongside-rare-big-game-hunts-African-safaris.html

  • Kendall Jones, 19, is posting the photos on Facebook, where some believe the shots should be taken down
  • Jones has posted shots of herself posing with dead elephants, hippos and lions among others that she’s killed across Africa
  • Jones claims her kills come after a ‘fair chase,’ but thousands are demanding that Facebook remove the posts
  • Jones is a cheerleader at Texas Tech and is gunning for a reality show about her African adventures

By Joshua Gardner

Global animal lovers are up in arms over a teenage Texas girl’s love of killing big African game, so much so that they’re even demanding she be banned from posting pictures of herself smiling alongside her trophies online.

Nineteen-year-old Kendall Jones claims photos of dead hippos, elephants, lions and other beasts on Facebook are a testament to her hunting skills and dedication to game preservation.

But critics are appalled by the teen’s beaming social media and are calling Kendall sick and depraved for killing the rare animals and boasting about it online.

Scroll down for video

Conserving by killing? 19-year-old Texas cheerleader Kendall Jones really likes to kill rare animals in Africa. While she pays for her legal hunts, her critics says she's not the conservationist she claims to be

Conserving by killing? 19-year-old Texas cheerleader Kendall Jones really likes to kill rare animals in Africa. While she pays for her legal hunts, her critics says she’s not the conservationist she claims to be

 

Loves to hunt: Jones faces criticism over her claims that she's a conservationist. The Texas Tech cheerleader's smiling poses alongside dead rare African animals have won her particular ire

Loves to hunt: Jones faces criticism over her claims that she’s a conservationist. The Texas Tech cheerleader’s smiling poses alongside dead rare African animals have won her particular ire

 

An online petition to force Kendall to remove her page because it promotes animal cruelty had gained over 40,000 signatures in just a week.

‘For the sake of all animals,’ reads the petition as it implored animal lovers to sign, ‘especially the animals in the African region… where hunters are going for fun just to kill an animal!’

Jones, whose Facebook indicates she ‘is looking to host a TV show in January 2015,’ maintains she is doing what’s best for the preserves, where there isn’t always space for even threatened species like elephants or lions.

‘Controlling the male lion population is important within large fenced areas like these,’ Jones writes. ‘Funds from a hunt like this goes partially to the government for permits but also to the farm owner as an incentive to keep and raise lions on their property.’

Jones’s photos show her posing with bagged zebras, hugging a dead leopard, and smiling beside elephants she’s killed.

One particular photo, in which she’s posing alongside a an extremely endangered rhinoceros, has her critics especially steaming, but the Texas Tech cheerleader says it was alive and well.

‘The vet drew blood, took DNA samples, took body and head measurements, treated a leg injury and administered antibiotics. I felt very lucky to be part of such a great program and procedure that helps the White Rhino population through conservation,’ she wrote.

Big 5: Jones says her first kill was a rare African white rhino, part of her quest to bag the Big 5 African game animals (rhino, elephant, Cape buffalo, leopard and lion)

Big 5: Jones says her first kill was a rare African white rhino, part of her quest to bag the Big 5 African game animals (rhino, elephant, Cape buffalo, leopard and lion)

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2675807/Animal-lover-outrage-blonde-Texas-cheerleader-smiles-dozens-photos-alongside-rare-big-game-hunts-African-safaris.html#ixzz36MD3myI2

and if you haven’t read enough about her yet, here’s a link to all 226 articles that come out today: https://news.google.com/news/story?pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&ncl=dud2BbJ6yB4ChAMWM48-BLgzTe7YM

Anti-hunting activists outraged by Teenage Mutant Psycho Huntress

1383480_10151726970777825_1974489269_n

Teenage Mutant Psycho Huntress, Kendall Jones, is all over the news today. Here’s a sample of the dozens of articles featuring the young killer:

 

Cheerleader Turned Extreme Hunting Enthusiast Taking Heat For Big Game

MyFox Los Angeles  – ‎14 hours ago‎
Nineteen-year-old Kendall Jones claims photos of dead hippos, elephants, lions and other beasts on Facebook are a testament to her hunting skills and dedication to game preservation. But critics are appalled by the teen’s beaming social media and are …

Protests Greet Cheerleader’s Hunting Photos

NBCNews.com  – ‎4 hours ago‎
Top Stories. Protests Greet Cheerleader’s Hunting Photos · Food Allergy Treatments for Children Show Promise · Tim Howard: U.S.

Anti-hunting activists outraged by Texas Tech cheerleader

KVVU Las Vegas  – ‎7 hours ago‎
“Here is the S African Vet administering treatment to the White Rhino I darted during the Green Hunt. The vet drew blood, took DNA samples, took body and head measurements, treated a leg injury and administered antibiotics.
New York Daily News

SEE IT: Texas Tech cheerleader, 19, loves shooting big game in Africa — and

New York Daily News  – ‎Jul 1, 2014‎
Pretty in pink. Deadly in camo. Animal rights activists aren’t pleased with a Texas Tech University cheerleader’s hunting trips that have left trails of blood throughout Africa. The pictures of her beaming beside dead animal carcasses have caused an

Sunday Hunting Law Goes Into Effect

WHAG  – ‎17 hours ago‎
“I think the Sunday hunting bill is a good thing for hunters in Frederick County because it lets the average person that works Monday through Friday, it gives them an extra day to hunt, and extra day to harvest deer for their family and put food on the

“The Deadly Link” Between Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence

The Deadly Link Trailer 6.11.2014

A new trailer for “The Deadly Link” documentary film on the connection between animal abuse and domestic violence/child abuse. Please support our project by donating at http://www.thedeadlylink.com or on…
00:03:47
Added on 6/12/14
61 views

“It Was Raining Pigeons”: Millions Die in Taiwan Sea Races

https://secure.peta.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=5467

More than a million homing pigeons die every year during Taiwan’s seasonal pigeon races, grueling sets of seven races over open ocean from ever-increasing distances. Young birds—not even a year old—are shipped out to sea, released in the middle of the ocean and forced to fly back home even in the midst of typhoon-strength winds. Most often, less than 1 percent of these highly intelligent birds complete each seven-race series; many drown from exhaustion, perish in the storms, or are killed afterward for being too slow.

 

PETA investigators went undercover at the largest pigeon-racing club in southern Taiwan from June to October 2013. They infiltrated this secretive industry, obtaining access to racing lofts, to “shipping night” (when the birds are registered and put in cargo crates), and even to a ship from which the pigeons were released. Investigators recorded officials and participants as they admitted to the millions of dollars in illegal bets and the massive losses of birds in this ruthless “sport.”

pigeon
Click here to see more pigeon-racing images. 

Top racers and high-ranking club officials admitted to deadly conditions for the birds, who fly with untreated injuries, without enough rest between races, and through heavy rainstorms. PETA investigators captured video of a race in which tens of thousands of birds disappeared in a matter of hours and were presumed to have drowned. Even birds who survive these extreme conditions may be killed or discarded by their owners if they do not make the qualifying time for the next race in the series. Pigeons are smart, gentle, and loyal birds. They bond for life and can live more than 20 years. Yet almost all of the birds who begin their lives as racing pigeons in Taiwan perish in their first year of life.

“It was raining pigeons—literally. I’ve never seen such a scene. Every one of them crashed onto the boat. … Some crashed into the ocean. … About one hour after the pigeon rain, you could see the whole surface of the ocean filled with dead pigeons.”
—Taiwanese fishing boat captain

Money—not just entry fees, but vast illegal wagers—fuels the multibillion-dollar pigeon-racing industry in Taiwan. Wealthy racers pay upwards of $100,000 for imported breeder birds, and top flyers admitted to making millions on a single race. “Prizes” such as refrigerators are listed on gambling sheets as a cover for the cash bets that are the main draw for these events. Racers boasted that government law enforcement “can’t catch us.” The chance to win staggering sums leads to extortion, drugging of birds, the kidnapping of birds for ransom, and the use of rigorous anti-cheating systems that involve RFID tags, multiple stamps on birds’ wings for identity, covering their leg ring numbers, and meticulously comparing photographs of the birds’ feathers.

An international web of commerce supports Taiwanese pigeon racing: Breeder birds are bought and sold for tens of thousands of dollars from U.S. and international dealers, then kept as “prisoners,” constantly reproducing while their offspring are serially exterminated in race after race. A prominent U.S. racer and breeder who is currently facing felony charges as a result of a previous PETA undercover investigation is involved in selling birds to Taiwan. Bieche Lofts, another top U.S. breeder, recently sold a prize-winning bird to a Taiwanese racer for an undisclosed price. An Idaho company called Dynamite is even producing a specialized pigeon feed for the Taiwanese pigeon-racing market. Millions of dollars fly in this business, but for the pigeons it’s always a losing bet.

You can add your voice to protest the cruel use of pigeons for gambling by asking Wang Cho-chiun, director-general of the National Police Agency, to investigate the cruelty and the billions of dollars in illegal bets and un-taxed winnings associated with pigeon racing in Taiwan.

Sign sample letter here: https://secure.peta.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=5467

 

Makah whalers commemorate 15th anniversary of last legal whale kill

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20140518/NEWS/305189969/makah-whalers-commemorate-15th-anniversary-of-last-legal-whale-kill

By Joe Smillie
Peninsula Daily News

Also see:  Makah group plans to mark whale hunt anniversary Saturday in Neah Bay

NEAH BAY –– Fifteen years after returning from their tribe’s last legal whale kill, some members of the crew of Makah whale hunters who led that hunt set out again into the bay aboard the Hummingbird whaling canoe Saturday.

“It gives me chills. It just gives me chills,” said Charlotte Williams King.

Descended from a long line of whalers, King thought of her ancestors as she watched the canoes paddle in Neah Bay.

Her great-grandfather, John “Hiska” McCarty, dove underwater to tie closed the mouths of harpooned whales.

“I didn’t really realize it, but 15 years is a long time,” she said.

Saturday’s paddle, which included a chase canoe, was organized by the Makah Whaling Commission.

It commemorated the anniversary of the tribe’s successful whale hunt on May 17, 1999. It was the first time in 50 years that the Makah had harpooned a whale, and it happened aboard Hummingbird.

Members of the 1999 hunt crew led by Capt. Wayne Johnson were Theron Parker, Mike Steves, Darrell Markishtum, Glenn Johnson, Keith Johnson, Arnie Hunter, Franklin Wilson, Bruce Gonzelas, Dan Greene, Gordon Parker, Andy Noel, Donald H. Swan and Greg Arnold.

Most were aboard Hummingbird on Saturday.

Keith Johnson, president of the whaling commission, recalled the controversy that surrounded the 1999 kill of a gray whale, nicknamed “May,” whose skeleton now hangs in the Makah Cultural and Research Center in Neah Bay.

“Last time we had a whaling crew in that [canoe], those terrorists, those eco-terrorists, that were out there in their Zodiacs waking our boat and throwing smoke canisters at us,” Keith Johnson remembered.

The last whale killed by Makah tribal members was in 2007, when a group of five illegally shot dead a gray whale.

Members of the 2007 crew were Wayne Johnson, Parker, Noel, Gonzales and William Secor Sr.

Wayne Johnson served five months in federal prison and Noel 90 days for their roles in the kill.

Hummingbird was retired in 2006 after it capsized, killing Joseph Andrew “Jerry” Jack, a hereditary chief of the Mowachaht/Muchalaht tribe of Vancouver Island, during an InterTribal Canoe Journey.

Some had called for Hummingbird to be burned, Keith Johnson said, saying it had been cursed.

“You don’t burn a whaling canoe,” he said Saturday. “You bless it.”

The Makah voluntarily stopped hunting gray whales in the 1920s when populations diminished. Gray whales were listed as endangered species in 1970.

When the species was taken off the list in 1994, the Makah worked to resume subsistence hunting.

In the 15 years since the legal kill, the tribe’s right to hunt whales, guaranteed in the 1855 Treaty of Neah Bay, has been embroiled in court reviews over science.

After being allowed to hunt in 1998 and 1999,which ended in the killing of one whale, whale hunts were stopped shortly thereafter by a federal court order saying the Makah needed an environmental impact statement to obtain a waiver from the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act.

The International Whaling Commission in 2007 granted the tribe the right to kill as many as 20 whales over five years — with no more than five in a single year — but it still must get a federal waiver to conduct a hunt.

“We have judges that are animal rights activists that will do anything to put a road block in front of our treaty right to hunt whales,” Keith Johnson said.

“Just leave us alone.”

Conservationists say they are pleased that it’s been 15 years since the last legal hunt.

“We feel differently about the 15th anniversary,” said Margaret Owen, who formed Peninsula Citizens for the Protection of Whales with her husband, Chuck, to speak against the tribe’s whale hunts.

“There’s 60 whales that could have been killed in that time,” Owens said.

A draft environmental impact statement underway in 2008 was stopped by new scientific information that found the group of gray whales that frequents the Washington coast has distinctive genetic markers that differentiate them from the 20,000 gray whales that migrate along the West Coast.

“Those resident whales would have been gone,” Chuck Owens said.

Donna Darm, associate deputy administrator for NOAA’s west region, said Thursday a new statement incorporating that information should be ready for public review by the fall.

Darm and Keith Johnson noted that the tribe’s hunt plan calls for kills of transient whales only.

The 1999 hunt was uplifting for many members of the tribe, according to Makah General Manager Meredith Parker.

“There’s a lot of pride that has stuck with us from that 1999 hunt,” Parker said, “because we did it the right way.”

But the rogue 2007 hunt created divisions, Keith Johnson said, pointing out there was no event to mark the 10-year anniversary of the 1999 hunt.

“Do you see the whole tribe here?” he asked as he pointed to the three dozen people on the beach before Saturday’s commemorative paddle.

Saturday’s paddle began with a prayer for more unity from Gordon Lyons and a song for good luck from Darrell Markishtum.

Keith Johnson expressed hope that divisions within the tribe could be closed.

“It’s our traditional food, and people still want it,” Johnson said. “And if for no other reason, a lot of people here will support us for the treaty right.”

Johnson also pointed to the tribe’s cohesion in 1999.

“When we all get attacked, we all stick together. Because we’re one community.”

DSC_0036