The Horrors of Vietnam’s Meat Trade

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/dogs-kept-cramped-cages-slaughtered-4369456#ixzz3F2Bei22u

Oct 02, 2014 22:30
by Nelufar Hedayat
Reporter Nelufar Hedayat looks at the terrible conditions dogs are forced to live in just to keep the black market in dog meat supplied

A shocking new TV documentary will reveal how hundreds pet dogs are being stolen every day in Vietnam for the lucrative dog meat trade. Unreported World shows disturbing evidence of how dogs are stolen, force-fed, kept in cramped cages and slaughtered for meals. Here, reporter Nelufar Hedayat exclusively reveals the horrors she witnessed.
The smell of dog and filth permeated the whole room along with frantic, high-pitched barking from the hundreds of dogs crammed into the large metal caged room.
Inside, line upon line of smaller crates were already packed with dogs who seemed to be vomiting rice onto the wet floor.
Grabbing one dog by the throat, the four men dragged it to a contraption at the back of the room, where one of them attached a tube to small buckets full of rice. He then pushed the other end of the pipe down the dog’s throat as the fourth man pulled down hard on a pump, forcing rice into the dog’s stomach.
The terrified local Vietnamese mutt screamed in pain, defecting and urinating as it was forced out and caged again, only to vomit the rice he’d just been force fed.
I watched horrified as this then happened again and again and again, presumably something happening to the hundreds of dogs here.
To call it a house of horrors would be no overstatement. But this is the reality of the dog meat industry in Vietnam, where thousands of dogs are force-fed to increase their weight, and therefore their market value when they are sold on.
Chau Doan
Trapped: Dogs
Breathtaking, after what I’d just seen, I asked the owner if the dogs feel pain when they are force-fed like that. His off-hand reply was “no-not at all, no pain”.
On the flight to Vietnam to investigate the dog meat trade in the country, I had prepared myself mentally. I knew what I was about to see would be brutal, difficult and shocking. But what I found was beyond even what I had imagined.
Almost certainly some of the dogs being force-fed in that room will have once been people’s pets.
The insatiable appetite for eating dog in Vietnam has sparked a huge black market in it and has provided a huge payday for thieves who steal thousands of dogs to sell on and meet the demands of the lucrative market.
Traditionally, dogs were trucked over in their hundred of thousands from Thailand where they would go without food and water for days on end till they reached Vietnam.
In the last six months the Soi Dog Foundation has worked hard with the Thai government to stop these criminals and bring an end to the dog meat silk road.
But the lack of dogs coming into the country has meant that criminal gangs have taken hold of the trade and need to find dogs from elsewhere.
In Hanoi, I spoke to two thieves fresh from a night’s work stealing dogs in a local village. They told me business is booming and gangs like his now prey on villages in Vietnam, stealing pets and guard-dogs by the hundreds.
“In the seven years I’ve been working, I’ve stolen round 3,000 dogs, big and small” one of them tells me.
Pets, strays or family guard dogs – they didn’t care because they had no-one to answer to and lots of money to make in the multi-million dollar industry.
But those whose animals have been stolen certainly care.
One man, Dang, who lives in the town of Nghe Ann, keeps his dog in a cage to prevent it being stolen and told me: “Along this road, all the failies living on both sides have lost dogs.”
Chau Doan
Sold: Dog trade
Almost 300 have been stolen over the last few months.
But it is a drop in the ocean of the dog meat trade overall.
It’s eaten in a host of countries including Thailand, South Korea, Philippines and China among others for a variety of reasons, from purging yourself of bad luck to increasing male sexual prowess.
It’s estimated that millions of dogs a year are raised, farmed and stolen to meet the ever-growing demand.
Every day or so I would I would see trucks in Hanoi with cages upon cages of deathly silent dogs all staring at passers by without so much as a bark.
They would be sold to slaughter houses or restaurants, kept for a few days and then killed in front of one and other by the roadside in the markets of Hanoi.
At one of the marketss the street is lined with holding pens, each with up to 500 dogs inside. The will be weighed to assess their value before being packed into incredibly cramped crates.
Chau Doan
For sale: Dogs as food
At busy times, the holding houses on this street process around 2,000 dogs in a single day.
The lust for dog meat grows as the Vietnamese become increasingly better off. The country has been transformed from one on the brink of starvation 30 years ago, to a place on the up and up by rapid economic changes.
People now have more money to spend on food, going out and partying and dog meat fits perfectly into that culture.

Any celebration and especially the end of the lunar month calls for a trip to the many dog meat only restaurants there. But do these people know where the meat they feast on comes from?
“We don’t know but we don’t care” one group of young teenage diners told me. “We only care about how it tastes and we love it” he said as his pals nod in agreement.
But in Vietnam, dog theft is not a crime, all you get charged with, if at all, for stealing dogs is a fine of up to $100 (about one night’s work for thieves).
But that’s rare as dog thieves operate in the dead of night and are notorious for being armed with home-made stun guns, swards and machetes to stop any pet owner from fighting them off. They’ve viciously attacked and even killed people who have fought back.
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But the tension is getting to much to bear and now some villages across the country are fighting back. Numerous mob killings of dog thieves have made national headlines.
In one such village, N-hi Trung, in the centre of Vietnam, 68 people confessed to the killing of two dog thieves who they say stole over 300 dogs from them that year alone.
“We are not scared of them” one pregnant villager who took part told me. “We won’t beat them to death, just break their arms and legs.”
It felt surreal, just bizarre, to think people were being killed for someone else’s dog meat dinner.
But more than anything, what was the most upsetting was the scale and truly inhumane way the dogs that had been caught were treated.
You don’t have to be an animal rights campaigner to see blatant cruelty at almost every turn and some of the killing and brutality I saw will stay with me for ever.
Chau Doan
Horror: Caged dogs
There are no health and safety or hygiene regulations for the killing of dogs and at a slaughterhouse I watched as a dog was grabbed from a pit and rendered unconcsious with two blows to the head before its throat is slit.
And I cannot forget the terrible scenes of those dogs being force-fed at one of the largest dog-trading market villages in the north of the country Son Dong Village.
In a single day seven tonnes of live dogs would be packed into massive metal crates piled high on top of one and other and shipped to Hanoi City alone for the restaurants and slaughter houses.
From what my team and I saw, the whole situation seems to be coming to a climax in Vietnam.
I’m not against people who eat meat, far from it, and our Unreported World film isn’t about that. What we have uncovered is a world of lawlessness when it comes to dog meat in Vietnam.
A government with a don’t ask don’t tell policy; middle-men and thieves who do unspeakable things to the dogs for better profit margins and the dog meat lovers who rarely question where the meat they were eating came from.
Whether the answer is regulating it, like pork or beef here in the UK, or banning it outright – as it currently stands people and dogs are suffering pointlessly as a result of the dog meat trade in Vietnam.
My hope is that after watching this film, people, campaigners and even the Vietnamese government are moved to end the cruelty in the dog eat trade. It simply isn’t right for things to continue as they are.
* Unreported World: Vietnam’s Dog Snatchers is on Channel 4 tonight(FRI) at
7.30pm.

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Dog Deaths Prompt Idaho to Consider Changing Trapping Rules

http://www.care2.com/causes/dog-deaths-prompt-idaho-to-consider-changing-trapping-rules.html

Dog Deaths Prompt Idaho to Consider Changing Trapping Rules

Trapping for wolves and a number of other furbearers is allowed throughout the state, but these traps aren’t just a cruel way to torture and kill the animals for which they’re intended–they are posing a serious threat to non-target animals and our pets.

According to the Department of Fish and Game, in 2012, 30 dogs and 24 house cats were among more than 800 non-target animals who were caught. Trapper reports also show the number of dogs who have become victims of traps has increased from two in 2002 to 32 in 2013.

To illustrate the seriousness of the problem, in two widely reported cases last year tragedy struck when dogs were killed in baited body-crushing traps.

According to the Spokesman-Review, the first incident occurred the day after Christmas when a family watched their two-year-old dog die in less than a minute. The second incident happened in January when a woman took her four-year-old black lab for a run, whereby it was caught in a trap that was legally placed on public endowment land. Her and her husband had to call for help because the trap closed so tightly they couldn’t get it open.

In response to the growing number of dogs being trapped and increasing concerns being voiced by pet owners, the Department of Fish and Game released an instructional video in March of this year, and it’s really helpful: you just need to bring a bucket full of supplies with you, channel MacGuyver, or be kind of person who can function calmly while you’re watching your beloved dog suffer, as you try to remember how to open one of the medieval-looking torture devices without doing even more damage. No problem, right?

As infuriating as it is to think you would have to deal with that just because you want to take your dog hiking, and as easy as it would be to say the obvious solution here is to ban traps, that won’t happen. Voters already enshrined trapping as a hunting right in the state’s constitution in 2012. At least now officials are considering restrictions that could help prevent more accidents.

Last week the Fish and Game Commission voted unanimously to start making new rules for certain types of traps, and is considering other steps that were recommended by a working group, including requiring a trapper education program, posting signs, restricting the use of body-crushing traps on public land, and increasing set-backs for traps placed near trails. Once approved by the commission, these proposals go to the legislature for approval.

That’s Where You Come In

You can send a message to the Fish and Game Commission asking it to implement every possible measure to protect the public and non-target animals from the dangers traps pose.

You can also sign and share our Care2 petition asking state officials to do something to prevent the trapping of endangered Canada Lynx.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/dog-deaths-prompt-idaho-to-consider-changing-trapping-rules.html#ixzz37xk0flgd

Punish Instructor for Butchering Dog

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Target: Rubén Saavedra, Defense Minister for Bolivian Military

Goal: Criminally charge military instructor who slaughtered a live dog to desensitize trainees

Up until 2009, Bolivian military instructors regularly slaughtered live dogs during training exercises. Meant to “toughen up” and desensitize new cadets, this brutal practice finally became outlawed after tireless protests by the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). Recently, however, an instructor barbarically killed another dog, earning only a four-day suspension following the criminal act.

The New York Times reports the instructor “gutted a 2-year-old mixed breed dog” and “smeared its blood on students’ faces.” He ruthlessly butchered a helpless animal, and in doing so, he also brazenly violated Bolivian law. The ban, or “Resolution 217,” purports to enforce punishments for such violations. Nonetheless, the instructor has only been temporarily suspended, which is an insultingly insufficient penalty. Suspension is typically reserved for minor acts of insubordination, such as mouthing off to a superior officer. This soldier cut open and bled out an innocent creature. Perhaps the scariest part of this story is the idea that he will be allowed to return to the academy. One can’t help but wonder if the Bolivian military only enacted this law to appease protestors while secretly continuing to kill dogs.

There’s a reason butchering live animals desensitizes people: It is inherently cruel and traumatic. If the Bolivian military wants to harden its soldiers, it should use virtual simulations or old war footage to do so. Slaughtering dogs is both illegal and wildly unnecessary. In addition, instructors should earn more than a “slap on the wrist” for violating the ban. Sign the following petition to demand justice for this innocent animal that was brutally killed for the sake of “instruction.”

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Minister of Defense Rubén Saavedra,

In 2009, you approved Resolution 217, which prohibits the abuse or mistreatment of animals in military training exercises. Nevertheless, a military instructor recently slaughtered a two-year-old dog for the sake of instruction. Though Resolution 217 assures punishment for violations of this ban, the instructor has only earned a four-day suspension. This punishment is not only inadequate, it is profoundly unjust.

The “penalty” you have issued sends a clear message that you do not take your ban on animal abuse seriously. More importantly, it conveys that you value a soldier’s training more than the life of an innocent creature. A temporary suspension is not a punishment; it is a slap on the wrist that is commonly enforced for minor acts of misconduct. Employing such a measure in this instance is grossly disproportionate to the crime, and ultimately displays a lack of empathy on the Bolivian military’s part.

This instructor violated official regulation and he should be penalized accordingly. Not only has he senselessly killed an animal, he has directly disobeyed an order. Please seek true justice for the crimes that have been committed, and bring the soldier before a court to answer for his barbaric actions.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo credit: Kristin Miranda

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Wolves and Dogs Speak With Their Eyes

summer-dire-wolf-GoT-fanpop 

Wolves and dogs can communicate using their eyes alone, suggests a new study in the journal PLoS ONE.

The color of the face around the eye, the eye’s shape and the color and shape of both the iris and the pupil are all part of the elaborate eye-based communication system, according to the research, which could apply to humans as well.

Sayoko Ueda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology and Kyoto University led the study, which compared these characteristics of the face and eyes among 25 different types of canines.

Full Story: http://news.discovery.com/animals/pets/wolves-and-dogs-speak-with-their-eyes-140624.htm

Petitions: Prosecute man who Killed Cat with BOW for fun in Australia!

You might be thinking, who the hell hunts cats or dogs? Well, just yesterday I received a comment from someone who started off, “I already ate a dog, I love dog fights, blood,…” etc., etc., blah blah blah.

There are plenty of psychopaths out there; it’s up to us to put laws in place to keep them in their place (hell preferably).

Please sign these two petitions for domestic animals, one against cat hunting and one on to  Prevent cruelty to dogs and cats in China: http://www.change.org/petitions/prevent-cruelty-to-dogs-and-cats-in-china-2?share_id=ACCyzOYrFC&utm_campaign=friend_inviter_chat&utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=share_petition&utm_term=permissions_dialog_true

And: https://www.yousign.org/en/cat-bow-australia

Prosecute Australian man that KILLS Cats with BOWS AND ARROWS! Sign here for justice: https://www.yousign.org/en/cat-bow-Australia
Petition text: Tyler Atkinson form Ballarat, Victoria in Australia boasts online and in hunting forums about killing cats with his prized possession, a professional hunting bow. He even posted pictures of his deeds, a good thing because we can use it as evidence!He said: “Got my first feral cat this morning.Called him into about 3 meters after spotting him sniffing around about 50 meters away, and put a supreme on track and he was mine inside 6m”We urge the Chief Police Commissioner to start an investigation and prevent any other innocent animals from being killed by this man. – See more at: https://www.yousign.org/en/cat-bow-australia#sthash.xWFWv1og.dpuf

 

Beloved pets also lost, displaced by mudslide

[Only now, after the human death toll has been tallied up, do we hear about the no-human casualties of the Oso slide.]

imagesCALYDLG2

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Beloved-pets-also-lost-displaced-by-mudslide-253195501.html

By MANUEL VALDES, Associated Press Published: Mar 31, 2014
DARRINGTON, Wash. (AP) – After a rescue worker called her animal clinic saying dogs had been extracted from the destruction left behind by a massive mudslide, veterinary assistant Cassna Wemple and her colleagues raced to this small Washington town near the debris field.

They found one of the dogs at the fire station among a flurry of rescue workers and townspeople. Bonnie, an Australian shepherd, was wrapped in a comforter. She was muddy and had a broken leg in a splint. One of Bonnie’s owners had just died in the slide. The other had been pulled out.

“She was just very much in shock,” Wemple said.

In this rural community north of Seattle, Wemple said it’s common for residents to have plenty of animals, including pigs, horses, rabbits, chickens, dogs and cats. When the deadly slide struck March 22, beloved pets and livestock also perished.

The full number of pets and livestock killed may never be known. Authorities also don’t have a clear number of how many pets are missing or displaced by the slide, incident spokespeople have said. There are at least 37 horses displaced and at least 10 dogs that were missing, according to different animal services helping the recovery efforts.

“To know that their animals are lost and may or may not be found. It’s heartbreaking. It’s heartbreaking for the people and the animals,” said Dee Cordell of the Everett Animal Services.

Wemple said rescue workers could hear horses crying from the debris hours after the slide, but because of the unsafe conditions, rescuers couldn’t go in.

For those animals that survived, the community and outsiders have rallied in support with donations. Bag after bag of food for dogs, cats and chickens have filled up the rodeo grounds outside Darrington, which are serving as a makeshift shelter. At last count, it totaled nearly 45,000 pounds. On Saturday alone, 27 tons of donated food from Purina arrived.

Lilianna Andrews’s seven horses are now at the rodeo grounds. Their house wasn’t buried in the mud, but the displaced earth formed a dam, backing up the Stillaguamish River into a lake that rose waist-high in the house and as high as 10 feet in the barn.

“We got them out before they got any water on them,” the 13-year-old said after helping unload hay at the rodeo grounds on Saturday. “But they would have drowned. So we just had to evacuate them from the water, and they’ve been staying here ever since.”

The Andrews were in Seattle when a friend called to check on their whereabouts. When they realized it wasn’t just a small mudslide blocking the road, they hurried home. Their dog, cats and chickens are fine too, Andrews said, although they haven’t been able to get in to feed the chickens.

Volunteers are also tending to 20 horses that belonged to Summer Raffo, a farrier who died in the slide.

Wemple’s clinic, Chuckanut Valley Veterinary, treated three dogs hurt from the slide. One of those dogs, named Blue, had to have one of his legs amputated last week. His owner is still hospitalized. The owner’s daughter has visited the dog daily.

“He’ll be happier in the long run. No more pain in that leg,” Wemple said.

Bonnie’s owner was Linda McPherson, a retired librarian. She was in her living room reading newspapers with her husband, Gary “Mac” McPherson, when the slide hit. She died. He lived. Bonnie has been kept at the clinic for rehabilitation. At night, one of the staffers takes her home.

A memorial is planned for next week for Linda McPherson. Wemple said the staffer will bring the Australian shepherd to the memorial for a reunion with her surviving owner.

___

Associated Press writer Jonathan J. Cooper contributed to this report.

Update: Man whose malamute was killed seeks legal fix

http://missoulian.com/news/local/update-missoula-man-whose-malamute-was-killed-seeks-legal-fix/article_b47cb024-70ef-11e3-b34b-001a4bcf887a.html

by Rob Chaney

Layne Spence still brings his two malamute dogs, Rex and Frank, to run along the Clark Fork River in Missoula, but he’s not ready to take them back into the woods.

“This is where I let them run around,” Spence said on a winter afternoon near the Higgins Avenue Bridge. “You can tell they need to run. But we were out on the Kim Williams Trail where they were doing some work, and when somebody used a nail gun, the dogs just freaked out.”

On Nov. 17, a hunter shot and killed Spence’s third malamute, Little Dave, on the road above Lee Creek Campground near Lolo Pass. Spence was cross-country skiing with Little Dave, Rex and Frank a few hundred yards from the road gate when he heard gunshots and saw the dog get hit. Spence said he screamed for the man to stop, but the shooting continued.

The hunter approached Spence and said he mistook Little Dave for a wolf. All three pet dogs were wearing lighted collars. The incident took place in the middle of Montana’s hunting season, but on a closed road popular for winter recreation.

Spence reported the incident to the Missoula County Sheriff’s Department, which determined it had no basis for further investigation. There is no state law making it a criminal act to accidentally kill someone’s domestic pet.

The sheriff’s office also sent details to the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks and the U.S. Forest Service. Both agencies found no legal basis to charge the hunter with a crime.

Several days after the incident became public, the hunter appeared at the sheriff’s department. After an interview, officials reconfirmed their previous position – no law was broken. They did not release the man’s identity or further details of the interview.

Still, Spence wants justice.

“I’m not going to let it go,” Spence said. “I’ve seen the sheriff’s report, but I’m not supposed to talk about it. I’m leaving it in my lawyer’s hands.”

Spence has also talked with state Rep. Ellie Boldman Hill, D-Missoula. Hill said she’s working on legislation that could address the matter.

“If he (the hunter) would have shot an elk on accident, there would have been immediate liability,” Hill said. “But because he shot somebody’s pet, there isn’t a space in the law that fits. With domesticated pets, there’s a loophole in the law. We’ve heard from Montana Hunters and Anglers and the Montana Wildlife Federation they want that loophole fixed as well.”

Hill said she’ll be working with the Montana Prosecuting Attorneys Association on a couple of possible angles. One could be modifying the state’s cruelty to animals law, which now doesn’t apply to accidents. Another avenue might be to put more onus on hunters to know their target by putting pets on the same threshold as other poached wildlife.

Despite several offers, Spence said he will not get another dog to replace Little Dave. And while he’s also had offers for financial help in a lawsuit against either the hunter or law enforcement agencies, he said he wanted the effort to be directed at preventing future tragedies.

“I don’t want attention on me,” Spence said. “I want it on my dog, so this doesn’t happen to someone else. When I said this was like losing one of my kids, someone commented I should know what it’s like to actually lose a child. Well, I do. My daughter was killed by a drunk driver in 1987.”

Layne Spence's Malamutes Rex and Frank sit waiting and watching over Little Dave, front, who was killed by a hunter with an assault rifle

Layne Spence’s Malamutes Rex and Frank sit waiting and watching over Little Dave, front, who was killed by a hunter with an assault rifle

2 Wolves Were Killed By Hunters Using Dogs This Week

December 06, 2013

By Chuck Quirmbach

The Department of Natural Resources reports that two grey wolves killed in Wisconsin this week were shot by hunters who used dogs to pursue the wolves.

The wolf deaths happened in Rusk and Washburn counties. The DNR’s Dave MacFarland says hunters registered the wolf kills by phone. MacFarland says it may take a while to learn more details about how the dogs were used during the wolf harvest.

“The hunters are required by the fifth day of the month after harvest – so for these animals, that would be Jan. 5 – to organize a registration meeting with one of the wardens,” says MacFarland. “So the warden registration component of the registration process has not yet occurred for these animals.”

MacFarland says most of the discussions between wolf hunters and DNR wardens happen fairly quickly.

Rachel Tilseth of the animal protection group Wolves of Douglas County says she’d like to hear more details of this week’s wolf deaths, and hear soon.

“I would like to see more wardens out there,” says Tilseth. “I would like to know how many wardens were out there, and I haven’t heard anything on that. Once I find that out, I would like to know if the dogs chewed up the wolf. I want to know the condition of the animal.”

The DNR says it remains committed to enforcing state law, which only allows hunters to use dogs to track the wolves, not fight with them. The DNR says wolf hunters are now 32 short of this season’s quota. The only remaining wolf hunt zone is one in northwest Wisconsin.

 

Dogs Enter Wisconsin Wolf Hunt Monday

http://wuwm.com/post/dogs-enter-wisconsin-wolf-hunt-monday

by Susan Bence

Wisconsin’s second wolf hunt reaches a turning point December 2. Licensed hunters can now use up to six dogs to help track wolves. Wisconsin is the only state to allow the practice. Some celebrate the rules and others take to court.

Lucas Withrow started hunting with his dad years ago. Hunting with dogs runs deep in their family tradition. Today, Withrow raises and trains more than a dozen dogs on his property in Brodhead.

“I have a kennel of 15 hounds. Three or four dogs that I use on coyotes, and that’s all I run them on and the rest are pretty much a mix of bear and coon hounds. “

Hunting bear is Withrow’s passion.

Eight years ago, he joined the Wisconsin Bear Hunters Association and now represents the group on the DNR’s wolf advisory committee. Withrow says dogs will serve a valuable function in helping manage the state’s wolf population.

“The function would be to make sure that we use and utilize all opportunities to harvest the quotas that we are responsible for harvesting to help keep the population stable and healthy,” and Withrow adds, “it’s something else that we can enjoy with our dogs.”

Withrow rebuts criticism that the practice subjects dogs to potential violent injury or death.

“From my perspective, I would tell you a dog introduced into the woods with the intention of chasing of wolf, that’s part of the responsibility of assuming the hunt. When you assume the responsibility for pursuing the wolf, you assume the responsibility for what can happen.”

“Allowing dogs to get torn up by wolves for the enjoyment of their owners, seeking to pursue wolves in this fashion, violates animal cruelty law,” Jodi Habush Sinykin says.

She is a Milwaukee attorney and represents a collection of humane societies, conservation groups and what she calls, “mainstream hunters.” She successfully took the issue to court. Sinykin argued that the DNR failed to write rules to protect hounds used in hunting wolves.

At least during Wisconsin’s inaugural wolf hunt in 2012 – a judge issued an injunction against the use of dogs. The lawsuit now rests in the hands of the state court of appeals. Sinykin has been awaiting a decision for weeks.

“Without intervention from the Court of Appeals starting December 2, dogs will be used by their owners with the known risks of what transpires when dogs who are unleashed and unprotected and at significant distances from their handlers encroach on wolf territory,” explains Sinykin. “And as we know from 25 years of depredation payments is that dogs are maimed and killed by wolves.”

For those years, hunting wolves was illegal in Wisconsin because their numbers were scarce. During that time, if a wolf killed a dog, the state reimbursed the owner.

Now that wolves have shifted to ‘hunt and trap status’, the state will not compensate hunters, if their hounds are killed during the chase.

We may not find out how many dogs are killed during the hunt. The DNR wants hunters to report dog casualties, but they are not required to do so.

The season will end on February 28 or when hunters take the state quota of 251.

copyrighted wolf in river