It Looks Like Hunting Accident Season is Here Again

Hunting accident or crime?

Springfield News-Leader  – ‎2 hours ago‎
“This is based very closely to a real case where the wife’s boyfriend thought the best way to get rid of the husband was by shooting him and making it look like a hunting accident,” said Rod Slings, an Iowa-based instructor. He was part of last week’s

Woman shot, killed in hunting accident in Pickens County Saturday

AL.com  – ‎Sep 15, 2014‎
ALICEVILLE, Ala. (AP) – Sheriff’s officials in western Alabama say they’ve investigating the death of a woman who was shot during a hunting trip. Pickens County Sheriff David Abston tells the Tuscaloosa News 29-year-old Heather Garner was killed when …
fox13now.com

Police: Man accidentally shoots, kills brother in hunting accident

fox13now.com  – ‎Sep 15, 2014‎
RICH COUNTY, Utah – A 49-year-old man is dead after his brother shot him during a hunting accident Saturday afternoon in Rich County, according to the Rich County Sheriff’s Office.

Chiawana HS QB Seriously Injured in Hunting Accident

KVEW  – ‎Sep 16, 2014‎
Chiawana High School Quarterback Mac Graff suffers a serious back injury in a hunting accident over the weekend. According to the Chiawana Sports Facebook page, Graff fell and hurt his back.

Hunting accident kills one near Little Creek Reservoir

KSL.com  – ‎Sep 15, 2014‎
LITTLE CREEK RESERVOIR – A 49-year-old man was shot and killed in a hunting accident Saturday afternoon, police said. Police received a call around 6:30 p.m.
Deseret News

Man killed in apparent hunting accident

Deseret News  – ‎Sep 15, 2014‎
Limited information about the shooting was released Monday by the Rich County Sheriff’s Office pending an investigation.

Alabama Woman Killed in Hunting Accident

WTOK  – ‎Sep 16, 2014‎
Sheriff’s officials in Pickens County say they’re investigating the death of a woman who was shot during a hunting trip.
WBIR-TV

10-year-old Knoxville boy injured in hunting accident

WBIR-TV  – ‎Sep 2, 2014‎
A Knoxville boy was injured in a hunting accident Monday evening. According to TWRA, the 10-year-old was dove hunting at the Buffalo Springs Wildlife Management Area in Grainger County when he accidentally shot himself in the foot.

Boy shot in Dinwiddie hunting accident OK

Richmond Times-Dispatch  – ‎Sep 2, 2014‎
DINWIDDIE —A 10-year-old who was accidentally sprayed with shotgun pellets in Dinwiddie County during the first day of dove hunting season has been treated and released from a local hospital. The boy, who wasn’t identified, was struck two times in the …

Boy injured in Dinwiddie hunting accident

Progress Index  – ‎Sep 2, 2014‎
The boy, who is from Dinwiddie, was taken to Southside Regional Medical Center for treatment, and was released yesterday. Dinwiddie sheriff’s deputies and EMS responded to the scene, and DGIF continues to investigate.

Man in serious condition after hunting accident

Gadsden Times  – ‎Sep 2, 2014‎
One man is in serious condition at UAB Hospital after a hunting accident in the Lakeshore Drive area of Rainbow City, Rainbow City Police Capt.

Man dies after being shot by brother in hunting accident in northern Utah

Greenfield Daily Reporter  – ‎Sep 15, 2014‎
SALT LAKE CITY – Northern Utah authorities say a 49-year-old man was fatally shot in a hunting accident over the weekend. KSL-TV reports (http://bit.

Man wounded by arrow in hunting accident

The Columbian  – ‎Sep 2, 2014‎
While the Volcano Rescue Team began hiking out to the injured hunter, it became obvious that the rugged terrain about 14 miles northeast of Mount St. Helens in Skamania County would make it difficult to get the man out of the area and into an ambulance
New York Times

Reflections on a Shooting Range Death, From One Who Knows

New York Times  – ‎Aug 30, 2014‎
WHEN I was 12 years old, I killed a younger brother in a hunting accident near our home in upstate New York. I returned to that memory this week, when I read about what happened to the young New Jersey girl who lost control of a submachine gun at a …

After fatal gun accidents, children can find comfort in poetry

PBS NewsHour  – ‎Sep 5, 2014‎
JEFFREY BROWN: When he was 12 years ago old, Gregory Orr accidentally killed his younger brother in a hunting accident near their home in Upstate New York.
Standard-Examiner

Brother Shoots Brother to Death in Hunting Accident

Knrs  – ‎Sep 15, 2014‎
NORTHERN UTAH AUTHORITIES SAY, A 49-YEAR-OLD MAN WAS FATALLY SHOT — BY HIS BROTHER — IN A WEEKEND HUNTING ACCIDENT. THE RICH COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT REPORTS, THE TWO BROTHERS WERE HUNTING …

Man shot dead in hunting accident

The Local.se  – ‎Sep 1, 2014‎
Police were on the scene on Monday morning after a man in his mid-twenties was shot during an elk-hunting trip in Västerbotten.

Fatal instructor shooting a ‘freak accident‘ and ‘sheer stupidity,’ gun range

The Express-Times – lehighvalleylive.com  – ‎Sep 3, 2014‎
“It wasn’t education,” Cramsey said of the fatal accident. “It was sheer stupidity.” Gun violence prevention advocate Shira Goodman, of CeaseFire PA, said she hopes the sad incident can start a conversation about children at gun ranges.

Roadblock set to benefit hunting accident victim

Gadsden Times  – ‎Sep 4, 2014‎
The friends of Cody Kuechle, a Rainbow City man injured in a Labor Day hunting accident, plan to raise money Saturday to offset expenses related to his hospitalization.

Grizzly involved in fatal attack on hunter will stay in K-Country with cub

http://www.calgaryherald.com/Grizzly+involved+fatal+attack+hunter+will+stay+Country+with/10196069/story.html

By Colette Derworiz, Calgary Herald September 11, 2014

Grizzly involved in fatal attack on hunter will stay in K-Country with cub

Richard Cross was killed by a grizzly bear in Kananaskis Country on the weekend. Officials have decided against destroying the bear responsible for his death, ruling it a defensive attack.

Photograph by: Facebook photo , Calgary Herald

A grizzly bear that killed a sheep hunter in Kananaskis Country on the weekend will be left in the area with her cub, after it was ruled a defensive attack.

On the weekend, Calgarian Rick Cross was walking alone along the Picklejar Creek trail when he was attacked and killed by the bear.

“It was definitely a defensive attack, not a predatory one,” said Glenn Naylor, district conservation officer with Kananaskis Country. “That was the main decision-making factor, but we have to look at all of the evidence and all possible scenarios first.

“The evidence clearly points to the fact that he out of the blue encountered this situation and the chain of events that happened pretty quickly.”

Cross was hunting for big horn sheep Saturday, but didn’t return home that night as expected. His family reported him missing to police Sunday morning and a search began immediately.

Officers found his backpack and rifle Sunday, but had to call off the search as darkness fell and bears were still in the area. They found his remains not far from his belongings a day later.

Naylor said the evidence shows that the bear responded defensively, both because of its cub and a freshly killed deer carcass in the area.

“It attacked Mr. Cross and the result was tragic. He was killed,” he said. “After he was no longer a threat, the bear left him alone. He wasn’t touched again.”

That led biologists with both Alberta Parks and Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development to rule it a defensive attack.

“That was the conclusion that was arrived at by everyone,” he said, noting other options would have been to capture and relocate the bear, or destroy it.

Naylor said provincial officials have met with the Cross family about their decision to leave it alone.

“They were appreciative of all of our efforts,” he said. “They had no problem with the result.”

Kim Titchener, program director at Bow Valley WildSmart, said it’s the decision she expected.

“They have a great reputation for doing what’s right for wildlife and what’s right for public safety,” she said. “That bear isn’t a threat. She was doing what bears do.”

The Picklejar area will remain closed until the bear and her cub are finished feeding on the deer carcass.

cderworiz@calgaryherald.com

Why the “NO HUNTING” Signs?

I stopped by the small town hardware store yesterday to pick up some fresh “NO HUNTING” signs, and the clerk acted put out that I didn’t let trespassers shoot wildlife on my land.

Like so many cunning hunters nowadays, he wanted to come across as some saintly, salt-of-the-earth type who would be doing me a favor by killing my deer friends. How could I possibly object to that?

Well, in addition to the obvious, there’s always the chance that a family member could be hit by a stray bullet, pellet or arrow, as happened that same day to a beautiful husky mix who was just minding his own business:

Husky survives after being shot in the head with an arrow

By Keith Eldridge   Published: Sep 15, 2014

RAYMOND, Wash. — The search is on for whoever shot a hunting arrow into the skull of a Husky mix dog. The arrow went in straight through the eye socket and the vet says it’s a miracle Sampson alive.

At first, Sampson’s family and local veterinarians had no clue why his eye was swollen and bleeding. Then the initial X-rays showed the startling revelation: A hunting arrow was inside Sampson’s head. A CAT scan further detailed what was going on.

“Razor sharp blades that went in and embedded in the back of his skull,” said Laura Bowerman, Sampson’s owner.

Bowerman says Sampson and their other dog Delilah always roam free on the 30 acres just east of Raymond along the banks of the Willapa River. When Sampson was two hours overdue Sept. 7, they went looking for him.

They found him collapsed at the end of the driveway.

He was rushed to Willapa Vet Services where vets took X-rays showing the arrow went straight back under his brain, clipping the casing around the brain and just a little bit of his brain.

Sampson needed a neurosurgeon immediately. A vet tech accompanied the dog and the family to Summit Vet Referral in Tacoma where neurologist Dr. Jerry Demuth successfully removed the arrow.

“They had to open up the back of his skull to pull out the arrowhead and the rest of the shaft,” Bowerman said. Bowerman doesn’t suspect her neighbor as they have a longstanding agreement about the dogs. But it is bow hunting season for deer and elk. Even though “no trespassing” signs are posted, the area behind the Bowerman’s is prime for hunting.

But why shoot a non-aggressive dog?

“He doesn’t look like a wolf. He’s bigger than a coyote,” Bowerman said. “Somebody… it’s just mean. It’s got to be meanness. Who would shoot a dog?”

So far the Bowerman family says it has spent $7,000 to keep their beloved dog alive.

IMG_1185

Roadblocks to Raise Funds for Victims of Hunting

An Alabama paper, the Gadsden Times, reported the other day that a goose hunter was critically wounded by friendly fire. Apparently the victim and his buddy were both carrying loaded shotguns when his buddy slipped and hit him point blank in the side. 

They followed that article up with news that there would be a roadblock set up to collect donations to help offset the victim’s hospital costs.

My first reaction mirrored that of a Facebook friend who succinctly commented, “Un-fucking-believable.” The nerve of stopping everyone on the highway to ask that they fund a hunter’s recovery from a hunting accident! 

Then the thought came to me: two can play at that game.

I propose we set up road-blocks—everywhere there is hunting going on—to collect funds for the wildlife victims of hunting. Whenever a goose is winged by a shotgun blast, a deer is crippled by an arrow, a bear escapes on three legs from a shoulder wound or an animal is found struggling in a trap, hunters would have to pay for their rehabilitation and return to the wild. 

I guarantee if hunters had to put their money where their mouths are, it would cut down on the prolonged animal suffering inherent in the sport of hunting.

1441225_10151990537383491_1309889797_n

 

 

Bowhunter accidentally stabs himself with arrow

574922_10150775941916188_960382052_n

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) – A bow hunter accidentally stabbed himself with an arrow while hiking in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest about 14 miles northeast of Mount St. Helens.

The Columbian reports the man was walking through rough terrain Tuesday when an arrow fell out of his quiver and it somehow pierced a calf muscle.

The Volcano Rescue Team says rescuers began hiking to the injured man, but because of the remote forest location a helicopter was dispatched to airlift him to a hospital.

574922_10150775941916188_960382052_n

Hunter Mistakes Car For Wild Boar And Kills Driver

A short-sighted hunter who shot a car driver dead and wounded his passenger after bizarrely mistaking them for wild pigs is facing 5 years in jail.

Zbigniew Kowalski, 60, from the town of Leczyca in central Poland, had been out hunting in a nearby forest when he spotted the car containing victims Lukasz Nowakowski, 21, who survived, and Josef Kuchar, 23, who later died.

Mistaking the car for a wild boar he had let off a volley of shots, hitting Kuchar in the neck and Nowakowski in the chest.

Prosecutor Krzystof Kopania said: “The two men were wounded, but the driver Josef Kuchar, who later died, managed to drive them both to his home where his parents immediately called an ambulance.

“But by the time he got to hospital it was too late.

“We identified the hunter, he was immediately detained and he confirmed that he had mistakenly shot at the car. He realised his mistake when the ‘wild boar’ started its engine and drove off, but because whoever had driven off had clearly been alive he assumed he had missed the vehicle.”

Kowalsk later said he had not called police as a result and had carried on hunting. It was only when police cars turned up that and he was questioned by officers did he realise he had indeed hit somebody in the car.

Police confirmed that he will now be charged with manslaughter.

Fudd

Hunter pleads not guilty to starting massive California wildfire

nasa

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/08/13/us-usa-california-fire-idUSKBN0GD01O20140813

(Reuters) – A California hunter pleaded not guilty on Tuesday to charges that he started a massive wildfire on the edge of Yosemite National Park last summer after building an illegal campfire.

Keith Matthew Emerald, 32, entered his plea in U.S. District Court in Fresno almost exactly a year after prosecutors say he sparked the Rim Fire, which scorched 260,000 acres on public and private land in and near the park.

Emerald, who lives near the area burned by the fire, is charged with setting timber afire, leaving a fire unattended, violating campfire restrictions and giving a false statement to a government agency. He is expected to be released from custody after his $60,000 bail is posted.

Federal prosecutors say Emerald built a fire in the remote dry brush of Stanislaus National Forest, where temporary campfire restrictions were in effect because of drought, while on a bow-and-arrow hunting trip last August.

Embers from the campfire reached parched branches overhead and sparked the devastating wildfire named after the Rim of the World lookout spot nearby.

The flames scorched 402 square miles, destroyed nearly 100 structures and cost more than $127 million.

“The Rim Fire was one of the largest in California history and caused tremendous economic and environmental harm,” said Scott Harris, a U.S. Forest Service special agent in charge of the area where the Rim Fire took place. “While those harms cannot be undone, today we have brought criminal charges relating to the cause of that fire.”

Rescuers airlifted Emerald from the burning forest about an hour after the wildfire began, according to court documents. Emerald initially told investigators that he did not set fire to anything during his trip.

Federal prosecutors say that Emerald lit a campfire and then lied about it to investigators. If convicted of all four counts, he faces a maximum sentence of six years in prison and $510,000 in fines. He is scheduled to appear in court again on Oct. 14.

Emerald’s attorneys were not immediately available for comment.

(Reporting by Jennifer Chaussee from San Francisco; Editing by Sharon Bernstein and Eric Walsh)

 

Giant anteaters kill two hunters in Brazil

By Agence France-Presse
Saturday, July 26, 2014

Giant anteaters in Brazil have killed two hunters in separate incidents, raising concerns about the animals’ loss of habitat and the growing risk of dangerous encounters with people, researchers said.

The long-nosed, hairy mammals are not typically aggressive toward people and are considered a vulnerable species by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), largely due to deforestation and human settlements that encroach on their territory.

However, they have poor vision and if frightened, they may defend themselves with front claws that are as long as pocketknives.

The case studies of two fatal attacks by giant anteaters were described in the journal Wilderness and Environmental Medicine, which released the paper online this month, ahead of its publication in the December print issue.

“Both were farmers, were hunting and were attacked by wounded or cornered animals,” lead author Vidal Haddad of the Botucatu School of Medicine at Sao Paulo State University told AFP.

In the first case, a 47-year-old man was hunting with his two sons and his dogs when they came upon a giant anteater in northern Brazil. The hunter did not shoot at the animal, but he approached it with his knife drawn.

The anteater stood on its hind legs and grabbed the man with its forelimbs, causing deep puncture wounds in his thighs and upper arms.

The hunter bled to death at the scene, said the report, which noted that the encounter happened on August 1, 2012 but had not been described in scientific literature until now.

The other case involved a 75-year-old man who died in 2010 when an anteater used its long front claws — which typically help it dig into anthills — to puncture his femoral arteries, located in the groin and thigh.

“These injuries are very serious and we have no way of knowing whether it is a defense behavior acquired by the animals,” said Haddad.

He stressed that such attacks are rare, but said they are important because they show the need for people to give wild animals plenty of space.

- Easily startled -

Giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) are believed to be extinct in Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala and Uruguay. Some 5,000 exist in the wild and can be found in parts of Central and South America.

Overall their numbers have declined about 30 percent in the past decade due to habitat loss, roadkills, hunting, wildfires and burning of sugar cane plantations, according to the IUCN.

They range in length from four to seven feet (1.2-2 meters), and may weigh as much as 100 pounds (45 kilograms).

Giant anteaters eat mainly insects but they also enjoy citrus andHNTSTK_1_2__66133_1314490481_1280_1280 avocados, according to zookeeper Rebecca Lohse who works with them in captivity at the Reid Park Zoo in Tucson, Arizona.

“They are animals that can startle quickly — planes going overheard, chainsaws, leaf blowers can startle them,” she said.

“The way they defend themselves is by standing up on their rear legs and swinging their front legs in from the side,” she explained.

“They have incredibly muscular forearms and those claws are several inches long.”

Zookeepers generally avoid being in the same space as the animals, coaxing them into separate fenced-off areas when they approach their living quarters for cleaning, she added.

Anteater expert Flavia Miranda, who works with the animals in Brazil, said she was concerned that the journal article could cause more woes for a creature that already faces plenty of threats to its livelihood.

“We have a lot of problems with this species because people believe that (they) bring bad luck and kill the animal on purpose,” she told AFP in an email.

“But I understand the importance of the article because recently I also had an accident with a giant anteater that almost cost me my life.”

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/07/26/giant-anteaters-kill-two-hunters-in-brazil/

 

Friends thought rifles were unloaded in deadly accident

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Friends-thought-rifles-were-unloaded-in-deadly-accident-264673951.html

By Published: Jun 25, 2014

MASON COUNTY, Wash. — The Skokomish tribe near Shelton is mourning the death of 14-year-old Ciqala Miller. Deputies believe he was accidentally shot to death by his 13-year-old friend as both boys pointed hunting rifles at each other believing they weren’t loaded.

In court documents, the boy said he and Ciqala had spent the day fishing and were playing around at Ciqala’s house on Skokomish tribal land north of Shelton Tuesday evening.

“They were even arguing over who caught the bigger fish and playing and they both grabbed rifles and were playing and one of the rifles went off,” said Mason county chief criminal deputy Ryan Spurling.

The 13-year-old immediately went looking for help.

“The young boy come running out and was asking us to call 911 and was really panicky,” said neighbor Annette Smith.

Smith said she was first at the house to find Ciqala on the floor of the hallway taking his last breaths with little chance of saving him.

“There was no way,” she said.

Ciqala is from a prominent Skokomish family. His uncle is the tribal chairman. His father, Rick, is a prominent hunter. No word yet on whether the prosecutor will pursue the fact that hunting rifles were so easily accessible.

“There are different firearms rules as far as has a child had a hunter-safety class, have they hunted, that type of thing. Handguns are different than long guns in some of those respects,” Spurling said.

Smith is also a member of the tribal council.

“There’s also accidents that do happen and this one here was a really bad accident,” she said. “I really feel bad for both families.”

Both families expressed concern the 13-year-old was in a fragile mental state and on suicide watch in juvenile detention. They asked for him to be allowed to go home under house arrest while the legal process moved ahead. The judge agreed.

Tuesday night tribal members say they gathered around Ciqala’s body as it was brought out and sang while holding candles to allow the spirit to leave. There will be a candle walk at the tribal center to continue the traditional sendoff on Wednesday night.

Home detention after fatal hunting accident

5392112916dd2.preview-300

The Southland hunter who shot a fellow deerstalker after mistaking him for a deer earlier this year has been sentenced to seven months home detention, 400 hours of community service and ordered to pay $10,000 to his victim’s partner.

On April 13 Wayne Edgerton from Tuatapere mistook Adam Hill, 25, for a deer and shot him while hunting in the Longwood Forest in Western Southland.

Earlier Edgerton pleaded guilty of reckless use of a firearm causing death.

Several victim impact reports read to the Invercargill District Court yesterday talked about the impact of losing a young man and Edgerton’s stupidity, and they asked that he be imprisoned.

On hearing the sentence delivered by Judge Michael Turner, several people walked from the court muttering their dissatisfaction.

Judge Turner described the incident as Edgerton, a well known local gun safety advocate, as having a momentary lapse of care which had tragic consequences for both families.

Judge Turner ordered Edgerton to pay the victim’s partner, Christine Pink $10,000 for emotional harm and the forfeit of his firearm.

http://www.odt.co.nz/regions/southland/306963/home-detention-after-fatal-hunting-accident