Duck Dynasty Gun Ads: Blowing A Duck’s Head Off Makes Phil Robertson Happy

Duck Dynasty Gun Ads: Blowing A Duck’s Head Off Makes Phil Robertson Happy

The Connecticut based weapons manufacturer Mossberg & Sons announced a partnership with the self-proclaimed “rednecks” Duck Dynasty last summer to sell a line of 12 DD themed weapons. The weapons are coated in camouflage and have the words “Faith. Family. Ducks.” displayed on them.

A series of ads featuring the Duck patriarch, Phil Robertson, aired right before Robertson made anti-LGBT and racist comments in a December GQ interview.

In one of the ads, two of the DD sons prepare to kill ducks as Father Phil recites the opening lines from the Constitution.

 “Those are rights that no government can take from you to live, be free and pursue happiness,” Robertson says in a voice-over. “You know what makes me happy, ladies and gentlemen? To blow a mallard drake’s head smooth off.”

In addition to the DD weapons that kill ducks dead, Mossberg’s website also advertises .22 caliber weapons that are “perfect for small game, plinking (and) target shooting – or cleaning cottonmouths out of your duck blind.”

Of course no Duck Dynasty weapon advertisement would be prudent without utilizing a biblical reference: “Where there is a design, there is a designer. We were designed to kill ducks.”

The DD themed weapon collection also includes military-style designs with large capacity magazines that hold at least 25 rounds that are too powerful for small game. The entire line consists of nine different shotguns, as well as two semiautomatic rifles and a semiautomatic pistol.

Mossberg says each gun will come with an American flag bandana.

After Papa Duck made his homophobic and racist comments in the GQ article, A&E announced the suspension of Robertson. Conservatives flipped out. Days later, Robertson was reinstated. …coughcoughpublicitystuntcoughcough….

Article and Video here: http://samuel-warde.com/2014/01/duck-dynasty-gun-ad/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+SamuelWarde+%28Samuel+Wynn+Warde%29

Teen dies in accidental shooting during hunting trip

By Associated Press Published: Nov 4, 2013

BURLEY, Idaho (AP) – A 16-year-old south-central Idaho boy has died after being accidentally shot while people cleaned their guns after a hunting trip.

Cassia County Sheriff Jay Heward says Ryan J. Willes of Burley died Saturday night after being struck in the neck by a shotgun blast.

Officials say a group of boys had gone hunting Saturday afternoon and were at a house in western Cassia County cleaning their weapons when one of them discharged.

[Maybe I don't have the stomach for it, but I'm glad I wasn't there to see  this 16 year old take a fatal shotgun blast through the neck. Deserved or not, it had to have been an ugly, traumatic (preventable*) scene. *Needless to say, all hunting accidents are preventable by following this one simple guideline: Don't go hunting!]

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Reports of bullet-riddled raptors increase as bird season opens

One had bullet holes through its wing feathers, narrowly missing the humerus bone. Another had a body peppered with lead shot. They were the lucky ones.

Red-tailed hawks and other raptors fall as unintended or illegal targets each October as upland game bird season resumes in Montana. Those that survive the blast occasionally wind up in the care of raptor rehabilitators like Rob Domenech of Wild Skies Raptor Center.

“Most of it goes untold because the birds just drop and that’s it – end of story,” Domenech said. “But last week, I got a call from the manager at the Missoula landfill who had a raptor there. He found it right near the scale house. We think it was shot in that area, because it couldn’t have gone too far with those pellets all over its body. It was lead shot, probably for upland game birds.”

The hawk is slowly recovering at a clinic on Missoula’s south side under the care of Brooke Tanner, a licensed raptor rehabilitator.

“This one was the worst I’ve seen in all my years doing rehab,” Tanner said. “Usually it’s one piece of metal. This bird had nine. It must have been far enough away because the injuries were superficial. But the bird had been on the ground several days, and the wounds smelled pretty bad. We’ll let the bones heal and treat for infection before we try to dig out the pellets.”

Tanner has also treated owls, crows and numerous other non-game birds for firearms injuries. The red-tailed hawk with the blasted wing feathers was still able to fly, so she left it in the wild.

Federal law and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act prohibit the killing of migratory raptors such as red-tailed and rough-legged hawks, and all owls. Crows don’t have that kind of protection, but most of the corvids Tanner’s seen were shot inside Missoula’s city limits, where discharging firearms is illegal.

“I get several crows every year when the babies are fledging and they’re pretty vocal,” Tanner said. “People don’t like the noise.”

With raptors, the problem may be a mistaken assumption that the birds of prey compete with two-legged hunters for pheasants and other game birds.

“Rough-legged hawks are not predators of upland birds,” said Ben Deeble, president of the Big Sky Upland Bird Association. “They have a real small foot, and eat nothing but smaller rodents. Red-tailed hawks are more generalist, and they catch the occasional upland bird. But we don’t consider hawks to be a predation problem where there’s good habitat.”

Most hawks seek mice and voles that compete with pheasants for forage in fields and meadows. Golden eagles will kill game birds, but there aren’t many of them in the Missoula or Mission valleys where bird hunters are active.

Pheasant season started Oct. 12, while other upland game birds like grouse and partridge have been legal since Sept. 1.

“Among some, there’s sentiment raptors are big birds that kill things and don’t have much other purpose,” Domenech said. “There’s some anti-predator sentiment out there. It’s disheartening someone would kill these birds. This (birdshot hawk) is a young bird, and they have 60 (percent) or 70 percent mortality in their first year of life anyway. It’s tough out there if you’re a raptor. All it takes is one bad person with a shotgun and they take out a lot of hawks.”

Lead-ing the Way in California

From Wayne Pacelle’s blog, A Humane Nation

October 11, 2013

Bullets should not keep killing long after they’ve left the barrel of a firearm. Soon, in California, they won’t.

In an act that will have major national reverberations for hunting and ammunitions manufacturing in the United States, Gov. Jerry Brown today signed legislation to make California the first state in the nation to halt the use of lead ammunition in hunting. The HSUS led the fight, along with Audubon California and Defenders of Wildlife, besting the National Rifle Association, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, and other hunting-rights lobby groups that called for the status quo and the continued incidental poisoning of countless birds and mammals, including endangered California condors, in the Golden State. Gov. Brown also signed legislation today to forbid the trapping of bobcats around Joshua Tree National Park and other national parks and wildlife refuges – a second major wildlife victory for us.

Thank you, Gov. Brown. We are immensely grateful.

The lead ammo bill, AB 711, was authored by Assemblymembers Anthony Rendon and Dr. Richard Pan, and the bobcat bill, AB 1213, was authored by Assemblymember Richard Bloom. We are also so grateful to these legislative champions for pushing these important policies over the finish line.

Last year, Gov. Brown signed legislation to outlaw the use of dogs in hunting bears and bobcats, and the year before put his signature on a bill to ban the sale and possession of shark fins. He’s also signed more than 25 other animal welfare bills, protecting mountain lions, banning cruel traps and a wide range of other practices. In all, since voters passed Proposition 2 in California in 2008, state lawmakers and two governors have together enacted more than 40 new statutes for animals – including bans on tail docking of dairy cows and forbidding the sale of shell eggs that don’t meet the standards of Prop 2. Hats off to my colleague, California senior state director Jennifer Fearing, and the rest of our team for leading the advocacy efforts and skillfully working with so many lawmakers and with Gov. Brown. This incredible raft of legislation cements California’s place as the nation’s leading state on animal welfare.

When the NRA and other groups fought efforts more than two decades ago to ban the use of lead shot for waterfowl hunting, they said that a legal prohibition on its use would result in the end of duck and goose hunting. Such outlandish claims, which we can now evaluate in a very tangible way, have proven false. In this year’s legislative fight in California, the National Shooting Sports Foundation – the trade association for gun and ammunition makers, based in Newtown, Conn., of all places – spent tens of thousands of dollars running print and radio ads attacking The HSUS, but their expenditures were all for naught.

Lead has been removed from paint, gasoline, and other consumer products because lead kills. A preponderance of scientific evidence demonstrates that there are significant public health, environmental and wildlife health risks associated with lead from ammunition. One estimate says that there are more than 10 million doves a year who die from lead poisoning. When you consider that there are more than 130 species known to suffer from the toxic effects of spent lead ammunition, it’s quite a staggering toll. Scavenging birds like condors, owls, eagles, and hawks, as well as mammals like coyotes, are all at risk and known to be suffering. Death from lead poisoning is painful, and even when lead exposure isn’t high enough to kill an animal, it doesn’t take much to weaken an animal to the point that it succumbs to predation or disease.

With an alternative product available – including steel, copper and bismuth ammunition – why not make the switch?

Editorial support for AB 711 from newspapers across California has poured in – The Los Angeles Times, the Monterey County Herald, the San Jose Mercury News, the Fresno Bee, the Sacramento Bee, the Riverside Press-Enterprise and the Bakersfield Californian, to name a few. The president and the vice president of California’s Fish and Game Commission backed the bill, as did Department of Fish and Wildlife director Chuck Bonham.

This is an enormous win for our movement. Committed conservationists and animal welfare advocates know it is wrong to allow random poisoning of wildlife. It is inimical to any sound principle of wildlife management and other states should follow California’s lead. With the signing of these two bills, today is a great day for condors, bobcats, and more than 130 other species of wildlife in California!

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“Too Much Hunting”

Man injured in Goodhue County hunting accident

Monday, September 23, 2013 , by Brett Boese

HAY CREEK — A St. Paul man was injured Sunday in a hunting accident at the Hay Creek Recreation Area in Goodhue County.

Thao Yang, 28, was injured from “a stray shotgun blast,” according to a press release issued Monday by the Goodhue County Sheriff’s Office. The incident is believed to have happened at 1:50 p.m., though local authorities weren’t alerted to the situation until contacted by St. John’s Hospital in Maplewood at 5:19 p.m.

Yang was treated and released on Sunday, according to a hospital spokesperson.

It’s believed that Yang was hunting with another person when he was struck by pellets from a nearby hunter who was not part of their group.

“It’s one of those things of too much hunting in one place, I think,” said Kris Weiss, a sheriff’s office spokeswoman

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Game Departments Must Think They’re God

Cannon Beach, nestled along the northern Oregon Coast, used to be a prettymore housepix 235 peaceful place. It’s a nice, romantic getaway or a great place to bring the entire clan. Haystack Rock, perched immediately off CB’s two mile stretch of sand, appears on more post cards and magazine covers than any other feature on the entire coast.

Folks stay there to escape the noise and manic pace of Portland or Seattle, enjoying quiet walks, hoping to catch a glimpse of some of the native wildlife. A small herd of elk lives there and can sometimes be seen taking their own cautious walks out on the beach in the early morning, foraging on the thick, leafy salal bushes in Ecola State Park or resting on the grass in city parks at the edge of town, adding to the natural character of area.

Cannon Beach is not the kind of place people expect to run into cammo-clad Elmers with shotguns or compound bows stalking the area’s half-tame animals.

But when the town’s parks and community services committee wanted to limit the local hunting season to only one month, the Oregon state Department of Fish and Wildlife told them they could not limit the hunting season and instead set five seasons there, totaling 90 days.  And although the town of Cannon Beach wanted to restrict hunting to bows and arrows and shotgun slugs, the ODFW informed them that buckshot would be allowed as well.

Yes, you read that right—now any hunter who wants to can blast a 700 pound bull elk with a shotgun. What a mess that would be for some sightseeing family to come across. And how many elk and deer, who were nearly out of range at the time they were shot at, will escape with a gaping, bleeding, lead-filled hole in them?!!

According to the almighty ODFW, hunting on the Ecola Creek Forest Reserve will be extended from one month to 92 days, beginning Aug. 24. And rather than being limited to one season from Sept. 28 through Nov. 1, five seasons will be allowed through Dec. 8!

The great and powerful ODFW have decreed that hunting dates in the reserve shall be:
• Aug. 24 through Sept. 22: bow hunting for deer and elk.
• Sept. 28 through Nov. 1: shotgun hunting for buck deer.
• Nov. 9 through Nov.12: shotgun hunting for bull elk.
• Nov. 16 through Nov. 22: shotgun hunting for bull elk.
• Nov. 23 through Dec. 8: bow hunting for deer.

This is just another example of state game departments pushing their weight around, defying the will of the people and town councils, not to mention the will of the wildlife. Who do “game” regulators think they are, God? Sorry, but I hear that position has already been filled.

Text and Wildlife Photography © Jim Robertson

Text and Wildlife Photography © Jim Robertson

For Safety’s Sake, Some Gun Collectors Should Switch to Stamps

According the Associate Press,five people were wounded in accidental shootings at gun shows in North Carolina, Indiana and Ohio on Saturday. That’s five shooting victims—all in one day!

At the Dixie Gun and Knife Show in Raleigh, a 12-gauge shotgun discharged as its owner unzipped its case for a law enforcement officer to check at a security entrance, injuring three people, a state Agriculture Department spokesman said. Two bystanders and a retired deputy sheriff were hit by shotgun pellets and taken to a hospital.

Sheriff Donnie Harrison said that it was too early to know whether the shotgun’s owner might be charged, but that it appeared to be an accident. (But don’t be surprised if the victims are the ones who end of being charged—with failure to wear a bullet proof vest at a public gun show.)

The North Carolina show, which is held at the state fairgrounds (not annually, but four times a year), usually draws thousands of people (some of whom actually survive the event unscathed).

In Indianapolis, police said a 54-year-old man was injured when he accidentally shot himself while leaving a gun show. (He could have saved himself the entry fee if he would have just shot himself before leaving home.)

Emory L. Cozee, of Indianapolis, was loading his .45 caliber semi-automatic when he shot himself in the hand as he was leaving the Indy 1500 Gun and Knife show at the state fairgrounds. Police said that loaded personal weapons aren’t allowed inside the show, but (presumably since the shooting occurred outside the building in the fairgrounds parking lot) no charges will be filed. (After a trip to the emergency room, Cozee is comfy once again.)

And in Ohio, a gun dealer was checking out a semi-automatic handgun he’d just bought when he accidentally pulled the trigger. The gun’s magazine had been removed, but one round remained in the chamber, police said. The afore-mentioned (magic) bullet appears to have ricocheted off the floor and struck the gun owner’s friend in the arm and leg. The (erstwhile) friend was taken by helicopter to a hospital 30 miles north in Cleveland; his condition was not immediately known.

Now I’m not trying to trounce on anyone’s God-given American rights (except the self-allocated “right” to hunt and kill animals recreationally), but for safety’s sake, maybe some of these folks should take up crocheting, knitting or collecting stamps, rather than gun collecting. Once they’ve mastered benign hobbies such as these, if they still feel the puerile need to prove their machismo, they could work back into it slowly, starting with craft shows or canasta tournaments.

Hell, it sounds like playing Russian roulette is probably a safer pastime than attending some of those gun shows.

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Guns, Guns and More Guns

We Americans sure love our guns. Big ones, small ones, single shot or semi-automatic, antiques or shiny new ones. This year’s Black Friday gun sales set an all-time record (The FBI said it received 154,873 calls for background checks for new gun purchases on Nov. 23, a marked increase over the agency’s previous record number of calls: 129,166 last year. The bureau was so overwhelmed with calls that outages occurred at some centers). Americans’ infatuation with guns takes a back seat only to that which they have for cars; and as you would expect, the homicidal havoc wreaked by firearms is second only to the body count chalked up to automobile accidents.

With so many avid gun hoarders out there, the rest of us would have to amass a small arsenal to try to keep up with the Joneses. It seems U.S. gun owners so outnumber those who conscientiously object to personal weapon stockpiles that non-gun owners are about as few and far between as vegans at an NRA potluck.

But while keeping a pistol or shotgun in the home to dissuade intruders is innocuous enough, this excerpt from my book, Exposing the Big Game: Living Targets of a Dying Sport, is a good example of the obsession some folks have with guns:

People in “cattle country” often entertain themselves by using the beleaguered prairie dogs as living targets, taking all the more sick pleasure in shooting an attentive mother as she pops up from her burrow to see if it’s safe for her youngsters to come out. Hunters glibly assign the term “double tap” for a shot that kills both the mother and her adoring baby. “Tap” is a particularly perverse moniker considering that the hollow point bullets they sometimes use cause their victims to literally explode on impact—a sight that must really get the shooter’s blood up. Ladies beware: there’s a demonstrated link between cruelty to animals and domestic abuse, assault and other crimes on a killer’s violence continuum [including, school-shootings and the mass murder of Christmas shoppers at the mall].

One thrill-killer describes his sport this way: “Prairie dog hunting is a blast, on both private and public lands. I like to start by clearing everything within 50 yards with an AR-15, then switch to my .223 Remington for anything out to about 150 and finally trade up to the bull barrel .22-250 for the longer shots.” The only thing stopping a sportsman with this much bloodlust is the melting point of his gun barrel…

Coincidentally (or not), an AR-15 was also the weapon of choice of Jacob Tyler Roberts, the 22 year old Portland mall gunman, and a .223 was the assault weapon used by the Connecticut school shooter, 20 year old Adam Lanza. The .223 was also the semi-automatic rifle used by the D.C. Beltway snipers, John Allen Mohammed and John Lee Malvo. While there’s truth to the saying “Guns don’t kill people, people kill people,” the fact is, those who kill the most are the people who’re the most fixated on their guns, i.e: hunters. The Columbine mass-murderers, the serial killer known as Zodiak, and untold others practiced on killing animals before graduating to people. Chances are good that when we learn the backstory of the mall shooter and the Connecticut kid-killer, we’ll find that they were quite the little nimrods as well.

Text and Wildlife Photography© Jim Robertson

Text and Wildlife Photography© Jim Robertson

How the Grinch Stole Hunting Season

In answer to the awful, dreadful opening day of hunting season, I’m re-posting the following uplifting poem (based on the Dr. Seuss classic Christmas cartoon)…

How the Grinch Stole Hunting Season

Every hunter

Down in Hunt-ville

Liked hunting season a lot…

But the Grinch,

Who lives just North of Hunt-ville,

Did NOT!

The Grinch hated hunting! The whole hunting season!

Now, please don’t ask why. There are many good reasons.

It could be because hunter’s heads aren’t screwed on quite right.

It could be, perhaps, that their belts are too tight.

But I think that the most likely reason of all

May be that their hearts (and other parts) are two sizes too small.

“They’re cleaning their guns!” the Grinch snarled with a sneer.

“Tomorrow is hunting season! It’s practically here!”

Then he growled, with his Grinch fingers nervously drumming,

“I MUST find a way to keep hunting season from coming!”

For, tomorrow, he knew…

…All the Hunt-girls and boys

Would wake up bright and early. They’d rush for their toys!

Their rifles, their shotguns—all things that destroy!

And then! Oh, the noise! Oh, the noise! Noise! Noise! Noise!

That’s one thing he hated! The NOISE! NOISE! NOISE! NOISE!

Then they’d carve up the body of some unfortunate beast,

Which was something the Grinch couldn’t stand in the least!

And they’d feast! And they’d feast!

And they’d FEAST! FEAST! FEAST! FEAST!

I MUST stop hunting season from coming!

…But HOW?”

Then he got an idea!

A brilliant idea!

THE GRINCH

GOT A WONDERFUL, INSPIRED IDEA!

“I know just what to do!” The Grinch laughed in his throat.

And he made a quick Santy Claus hat and a coat.

And he chuckled, and clucked, “What a great Grinchy trick!

With this coat and this hat, I’ll look just like Saint Nick

And I’ll slide down their chimneys, empty bags in my fist,

AND I’LL STEAL ALL THEIR FUCKING AMMO!”


Text and Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson