Donald Trump defending sons’ sport killing of exotic African animals may finally doom billionaire blowhard’s campaign

Brothers Donald Trump, Jr. (l.) and Eric Trump (r.) are pictured with a leopard that they killed on their trip to Zimbabwe. And now their father is defending them, which may doom his presidential Legends

Brothers Donald Trump, Jr. (l.) and Eric Trump (r.) are pictured with a leopard that they killed on their trip to Zimbabwe. And now their father is defending them, which may doom his presidential campaign.

Bad press has so far been like fertilizer to Donald Trump’s popularity. But his defense of his sons’ sport of slaughtering exotic African animals could be the kill shot to his presidential aspirations now that possibly both Cecil the lion and his brother Jericho have been slaughtered.G


In case you don’t know, the Trump boys went on a kill safari in 2012, and proudly posed with the African leopard and water buffalo they had slaughtered. Another photo shows them laughing beside a noose from which hangs an alligator. Does it get worse than two great white hunters and an animal noose in Africa?


There’s even the horrific photo of Donald Jr. smiling while holding the bloody, severed tail of, yes, the elephant he shot.

This elephant slaughter “sport” they love, is, surprisingly even more prolific than the barbarism of lion killing.


Take a wild guess at the number of elephants killed by terrorists (yes, terrorists) — hunters and poachers in Africa every day.

The shocking truth is that 96 African elephants are killed each day by not just poachers, but by scum terrorists like Joseph Kony and his “Lord’s Resistance Army.”

Donald Trump, Jr. is pictured holding the tail of an elephant he shot. Legends

Donald Trump, Jr. is pictured holding the tail of an elephant he shot.

These vicious beasts trade the ivory from the gentle beasts in exchange for “bush currency” to buy guns and weapons. Terror supporting terror. According to John Calvelli, executive vice president of the Wildlife Conservation Society, which runs the NYC zoos and aquariums as well as those in 60 other countries, “Thirty-five thousand forest elephants a year — one every 15 minutes — are killed in Africa, which means they will become extinct in our lifetimes. The numbers have gone from 1.2 million elephants in Africa in 1980 to fewer than 400,000 now.”


And life is as dangerous for the park rangers assigned to protect the beasts of the bush. One ranger is killed every three days.

Calvelli helped found “96 Elephants,” an organization whose function is to stop the killing, trafficking and demand for ivory. Last August, Gov. Cuomo made the sale of ivory illegal in New York State and a similar ban is now in effect in New Jersey.

So who are zookeepers to talk about animal rights?

Oregonion who shot wolf faces criminal charges

Eric Mortenson

Capital Press

Published:November 16, 2015 3:15PM

Courtesy of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
OR 22, a male wolf that separated from the Umatilla River Pack in February, is pictured walking through a Northeast Oregon forest on Jan. 26. A Baker City, Ore., man who reported he shot the wolf now faces criminal charges.



Although not a factor in the criminal case, the shooting happened as Oregon wildlife officials were deciding to take wolves off the state endangered species list.


A Baker City, Ore., man who told state police and wildlife officials that he’d shot a wolf while hunting coyotes on private property has been charged with killing an endangered species.

Brennon D. Witty, 25, also was charged with hunting with a centerfire rifle without a big game tag, Harney County District Attorney Tim Colahan said Monday. Both charges are Class A misdemeanors, each punishable by up to a year in jail and a $6,250 fine. Witty will be arraigned Dec. 2 in Grant County Justice Court, Canyon City.

The shooting happened in Grant County; the neighboring Harney County DA handled it as a courtesy because his Grant County counterpart was acquainted with the hunter’s family and wanted to avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest.

The incident happened Oct. 6, when Witty voluntarily notified ODFW and Oregon State Police that he’d shot a wolf while hunting coyotes on private property south of Prairie City. Police recovered a wolf’s body on the property.

Oregon’s action to remove wolves from the state endangered species list has no apparent bearing on the case. Wolves were listed under the state Endangered Species Act at the time of the shooting; the ODFW Commission on Nov. 9 removed wolves from the state list. Regardless, they remained on the federal endangered species list in the western two-thirds of the state.

The wolf was identified as OR-22, a male that has worn a GPS tracking collar since October 2013 and dispersed from the Umatilla Pack in February 2015. He was in Malheur County for awhile, then traveled into Grant County. Wildlife biologists don’t believe he had a mate of pups. Young or sub-dominant wolves often leave their home packs to establish their own territory and find mates.

OR-22 was the third Oregon wolf known to have died since August, when the Sled Springs pair in Northeast Oregon were found dead of unknown cause. The state now has a minimum of 82 wolves.

Cattlemen fed up with fires

Capital Press

Published:November 19, 2015 8:12AM

Courtesy of Nicole Kuchenbuch
Rancher Casey Kuchenbuch herds cattle toward his home field during the Okanogan fire on Aug. 18. Ranchers in Washington are critical of how state and federal officials fought summer fires.



Washington cattlemen blame state and federal agencies for their livelihoods being jeopardized by large wildfires.


CLE ELUM, Wash. — A panel of ranchers at the Washington Cattlemen’s Association annual meeting unloaded frustration and anger at state and federal agencies, saying their land management practices and inept fire fighting are to blame for massive losses of rangeland, cattle and fencing in the last two years.

The losses threaten the cattle industry, particularly in Okanogan County where more than 1 million acres burned in the last two summers.

That totals one third of the entire acreage of the county which, at 5,315 square miles, is larger than some states. Millions of dollars of public and private timber have been lost. About 1,000 head of cattle died in the Carlton fire last year in Okanogan County while the tally so far this year is under 300. Hundreds of miles of fencing were lost both years but probably the biggest impact is loss of grazing on thousands of acres for several years causing ranchers to buy more hay and sell off cattle.

“There’s got to be some change or this will ruin our industry,” said Vic Stokes, a Twisp rancher, who lost 250 head of cattle and 90 percent of his grazing in the Carlton fire.

The convention panel, Nov. 12 at Suncadia Resort, faulted the U.S. Forest Service and state agencies for not thinning forests and not allowing grazing which would reduce fire fuel loads.

The ranchers said local firefighters do good work but are restrained when state and federal agencies take over. The panel cited multiple examples of state Department of Natural Resources and USFS-led interagency fire teams refusing to attack fires last summer, watching them burn and in two cases backburning private timber and pastures without permission of the landowner or in direct defiance of their pleas not to do it.

Contacted later, USFS and DNR spokespeople said those agencies are working to reduce fire loads by thinning and prescribed burns.

Cathy Dowd, a USFS Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest spokeswoman, said when the USFS doesn’t attack a fire its because there is no safe place from which to do so.

“Folks may not think we are doing anything, but we are definitely managing and monitoring from the air and in other ways and looking for ways to engage and suppress it,” Dowd said. “All this year’s fires were suppression fires, meaning the goal was to put them out,” she said.

DNR Northeast Region Manager Loren Torgerson said it was the toughest fire season the state has experienced, that firefighters risk their lives daily and three died doing so. “We saved many people, homes and ranches and earned their heartfelt thanks,” he said.

He said DNR needs more resources for preventative thinning and fire fighting and urged the Cattlemen’s Association to support that request.

Traditional fire suppression slowly begins behind fires and fire lines are built along flanks, Jim DeTro, Okanogan County commissioner and a smoke jumper from 1967 to 1973, said at the meeting.

“Eventually, the beast wanes. They encircle it and claim victory but only when nature allows. But the dragon takes its toll. Firefighters earn overtime and hazardous duty pay and they accept failure and loss with no regard to how the loss could be prevented on the next event,” DeTro said.

In Pine Creek, Gerald Scholz and other ranchers built a fire line with bulldozers that held, but agencies wanted to backburn the area, including private ground, DeTro said. They did so even after they promised not to in response to Scholz’s pleas, he said.

The next day DeTro confronted the official who said he wouldn’t backburn and he “said I didn’t understand the difference between backburn and backfire,” DeTro said.

A backburn is suppose to be relatively small, but the area was not tied together by fire lines, he said. “We warned them about the wind, but they did it anyway and it got away from them,” he said.

“Guys are getting way to happy with their drip torches (for backburning). If these agencies have that kind of attitude they might as well backfire to the Pacific Ocean,” DeTro said.

One third of the 600,000 acres burned this year in the Okanogan, Tunk Block and North Star fires was caused by backburning, he said.

Craig Vejraska, an Omak rancher and former Okanogan County commissioner, said agencies burned his private timber, which is his bank account, without asking permission and just a week ago burned what grass he had left to complete a blackened area.

“It could have saved our bacon and now we have 700 cattle looking for a home,” he said.

“We should take the incident command away and give it and the money to the Riverside Fire Department. They put out a hell of a lot more fire than DNR,” he said.

He yelled at two USFS officials for being part of the problem. Earlier they talked about forest management and they responded that was their arena, not fire fighting.

Dowd, of the USFS, didn’t know anything about Scholz and Vejraska’s claims. DNR spokeswoman Sandra Kaiser said DNR staff contacted Scholz but he was unable to provide any names or details about his claims. Scholz could not be reached for comment, but his wife, Bobbi, said she’s not aware of DNR contacting him. The fire had been stopped, then DNR backburned in the wind despite their pleas not too, destroying their timber and shed full of hay, she said.

“We can blame USFS all we want. USFS is dysfunctional, but who makes it so?” asked state Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, and a rancher. He said Congress has to change forest management.

“We are in a critical situation right now where virtually every rancher is burned out. We need every inch of WDFW land made available for grazing to maintain an industry,” Vejraska said.

While state agencies are asking for more money to fight fires, Kretz said they shouldn’t get any until they perform.

In the 2014 Carlton fire, “huge (public) resources sat in town,” Brewster, while Gebbers Farms bulldozers and 180 Gebbers orchard sprayers with water saved the town, Kretz said.

“If you look at a map of that fire, you see a big green donut hole in the middle. Part of it was private (Gebbers) and part of it was public that had been thinned. But the big difference was Gebbers crews got in there and actually fought fire,” Kretz said.

“I went up on the fire with Gebbers folks. We saw occasional state rigs looking at maps and smoke and when they did see any smoke they headed for town. Gebbers headed toward the fire,” he said.

“What you hear from the state is that it’s catastrophic. That they can’t fight them. They talk safety. You can’t go in when its crowning out (in tree tops) at 40 mph winds, but watching Gebbers they didn’t go into the teeth of the fire but got ahead of it and didn’t put in scratchy thin fire lines but two D-8s (Caterpillar dozers) side by side,” Kretz said.

“I saw a complete and utter inability (by fire officials) to make a decision. They would say you can put in a fire line but can you use a D-4, not a D-8? They’re worried about environmental impacts, but it’s a fire,” he said.

DNR officials have a “smug” attitude when questioned later, saying they’ve heard stories and will have to run them down to see if they are true, he said.

Local residents had a fire line around the Cougar Flat fire, which became part of the Carlton fire, but were waived off by the DNR which then let it get out of hand, Alex Thomason, a Brewster attorney has said.

The DNR is directed by state Public Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark who is also an Okanogan rancher. There’s “a lot of sentiment against him” in Okanogan over politics, DeTro said.

“We have the crown jewel of initial attack in our backyard, the North Cascades Smoke Jumper base in Winthrop, but it’s under-utilized because of too much bureaucracy,” DeTro said.

He has audio tapes, he said, proving smoke jumpers on their way from the base to Oregon spotted the starts of the Carlton fire from the air but were told to keep going to Oregon by interagency dispatchers in Wenatchee.

Kretz said he passed a bill in the Legislature last year that allows people to fight fires on public lands.

“We have to get back to locals grabbing their tools and fighting fires. I had a bill to let counties opt out of (the state) fire suppression tax and use it for their own resources. We will run more bills this year,” he said.

Doug Grumbach, a Ferry County rancher near Curlew, said a decision was made to let large portions of the Colville National Forest burn, including 33 percent of his grazing allotment. He said he’s suspicious but doesn’t know if proposals to designate the area as wilderness had anything to do with letting it burn.

He said he lost 21 cows and miles of fencing.

“You do everything you can to save these animals and to lose them is devastating. There needs to be a change. I don’t ever want to go through this again. It ages you real fast,” Grumbach said.

Neil Kasyer, a Centerville rancher near Mt. Adams in southcentral Washington, said he was moving cattle out of the way of fire for four days before he saw anyone trying to put it out.

“DNR and tribal were bickering over who was in charge. Neither wanted to step up because they didn’t know if they would get reimbursed until it was big enough,” he said.

The fire burned some 55,000 acres around the base of the mountain for 20 days until rain put it out, he said.

He’s still looking for some of his 700 head of cattle, he said. A lot of riparian wildlife habitat has been destroyed for years by the wildfires, he said. 
“More money (for fire suppression) won’t help. What will help is controlling the fuel load, changing forest practices and getting locals back on initial attack,” Kasyer said. “Sitting there watching it for four days, deciding which way it will go and how big you want it to get is not the answer.”

Excerpt from: Will Paris Climate Talks Be Too Little, Too Late?

By Dahr Jamail, Truthout | Report

The faux goal of 2 degrees Celsius continues to be discussed. Meanwhile, the planet burns.

During the first week of December, delegations from nearly 200 countries will convene in Paris for the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) climate conference. It has been billed, like the last several, as the most important climate meeting ever. The goal, like that of past COPs, is to have governments commit to taking steps to cut carbon dioxide emissions in order to limit planetary warming to within 2 degrees Celsius above the preindustrial temperature baseline.

Yet this is a politically agreed-upon limit. It is not based on science.

Climate Disruption DispatchesRenowned climate scientist James Hansen and multiple other scientists have already shown that a planetary temperature increase of 1 degree Celsius above preindustrial baseline temperatures is enough to cause runaway climate feedback loops, extreme weather events and a disastrous sea level rise.

Furthermore, the UK meteorological office has shown that this year’s global temperature average has already surpassed that 1 degree Celsius level.

Well in advance of the Paris talks, the UN announced that the amount of carbon dioxide already in the atmosphere has locked in another 2.7 degrees Celsius warming at a minimum, even if countries move forward with the pledges they make to cut emissions. Hence, even the 2 degree Celsius goal is already unattainable. However, similar to the way in which national elections in the United States continue to maintain the illusion that this country is a democracy, and “We the People” truly have legitimate representation in Washington, DC, illusions must be maintained at the COP21.

Thus, the faux goal of 2 degrees Celsius continues to be discussed. Meanwhile, the planet burns.

Japan’s meteorological office announced that this past September was, by far, the warmest September on record, and records now show that October has also become the hottest recorded October. As a whole, 2015 remains easily on course to become the hottest year ever recorded.

As if to place an exclamation point on all of this information, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels hit a new milestone in excess of 400 parts per million in early 2015 – a 45 percent increase over preindustrial levels.

Extreme weather events propelled by anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) abound in this month’s dispatch.

Hurricane Patricia tore into the West Coast of Mexico, becoming the strongest hurricane ever recorded, with sustained winds of 200 miles per hour.

Yemen was struck by its first hurricane in recorded history, dumping what is normally a decade’s worth of rain in a matter of merely two days. As if that is not enough to show how intensely ACD is ramping up global weather events, less than a week later the second hurricane in Yemen’s recorded history made landfall, bringing fresh hurricane-force winds, torrential rains, flash flooding and death.

ACD is, quite literally, extinguishing oceanic life across the planet.

An ACD-driven El Niño brought October storms that wreaked havoc across southern California. Record storms in the high desert and mountains of the southern part of that state brought massive mudflows across major highways, which trapped hundreds of vehicles in mud that was 20 feet deep in places, stranding motorists overnight. The rainfall from the storm, which in one area fell at a rate of 1.81 inches in just 30 minutes, was described by the National Weather Service as a “1,000-year event.”

Meanwhile, a recent report shows that marine food chains are at risk of collapse due to ACD impacts, overfishing and pollution. ACD is literally erasing species from coral reefs, the open ocean, Arctic and Antarctic waters, and the tropics.

Moreover, another recent report reveals that bleaching and disease are combining to destroy the largest coral reef in the continental United States, a 150-mile reef found off the coast of Florida. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, it is the third-largest barrier reef ecosystem on the planet.

Read more:


Thanksgiving request: Thinking about somebody outside ourselves

Thanksgiving request: Thinking about somebody outside ourselves

from Susie Duncan Sexton

description Share, share, share and care, care, care, and stop eating animals? May your days be merry and bright IF you care about all species every second! Let’s get shelter animals homes and stop breeding farm animals and teaching children to kill – and terrorism can get nipped in the bud.

Dammit…it is the TRUTH! Thinking about somebody outside ourselves…and stopping the slaughter of animals? That is the perfect start to CALMING DOWN, folks! Lord have mercy on us all.


The secret of life? Embracing all who live WHILE we live. We are only here for a few seconds after all. Make some kind of fabulous difference? Thanks for reading! And vote for Hillary, too!


BLM Illegally Sells Protected Wild Horses for Slaughter

Ranchers who sell beef to Whole Foods Market are behind the largest mustang roundup of 2015-2016 is now underway in southern Oregon.

Ranchers who sell beef to Whole Foods Market are behind the largest mustang roundup of 2015-2016 is now underway in southern Oregon. Whole Foods has reacted to this news, by telling us to talk to the ranchers. (Read more about our correspondence with Whole Foods and its supplier Country Natural Beef here.)

Right now, wild horses are being brutally rounded up, removed from their families and their homes on the range, all so that ranchers can profit by selling beef to Whole Foods. Whole Foods then markets this beef as “grass-fed” to its customers and sells it at a premium.

Don’t let Whole Foods pass the buck. The natural foods giant must incorporate mustang safe standards into its animal welfare policies.

ACTION ALERT: The Imperiled American Wolf by Predator Defense

Originally posted on Howling For Justice:

Black female wolf 831f Yellowstone National Park_2012 NPS

November 21, 2015

Things have even gotten worse for wolves in Montana and Idaho, since this important video was filmed. Ranchers in Montana can kill up to 100 wolves on their land and wolf kill quotas have all but been eliminated in Montana and Idaho during the long wolf hunting seasons. In fact Idaho’s wolf killing season seems to be open somewhere in the state the entire year, which means wolves are harassed and killed right through mating, denning and pup rearing. It’s a national outrage but the public has forgotten Montana and Idaho wolves and have accepted the wolf hunts with very little push back. Howling for Justice, Wolf Warriors and many, many other groups, including Predator Defense fought the wolf hunts tooth and nail, only to have Congress override the courts and permanently delist wolves in Montana and Idaho.

Great Lakes and Wyoming wolves were placed back on…

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France bans imports of lion hunt trophies

“We trust that France’s decision will create a domino effect within the EU
and that we will soon hear about other member states joining together to
say no [to trophies].”

Catherine Bearder, a Liberal Democrat MEP who led calls for a ban in the
summer, said was “delighted” by France’s decision and the UK should follow
its lead.

The EU’s scientific review group, which decides whether or not to blacklist
trophy imports based on the sustainability of species, met in September and
approved the continued import of lion trophies from Tanzania, Zambia and

France has banned the import of lion heads, paws and skins as hunters’
trophies, nearly four months after the killing of Zimbabwe’s most famous
lion by an American trophy hunter sparked international outrage.

In a letter to the actor and animals rights activist Brigitte Bardot,
France’s environment minister, Ségolène Royal, said that she had instructed
officials to stop issuing permits for lion trophies and was considering
stricter controls on trophies from other species.

“Following your letter and recent visits in Africa in preparation of the
climate summit in Paris, I want to let you know I have given orders to my
services to stop delivering certificates for importing lion trophies,”
Royal wrote in the letter dated 12 November.

Last month, scientists warned that lion numbers in central and western
Africa are likely to halve in the next two decades due to loss of habitat
and prey.“

Concerning other species trophies, I am in favour of a much stronger
control for hunting trophies and this issue will be discussed with all the
countries concerned and with the EU.”

In July, conservationists and MEPs called for an EU-wide ban on the import
of lion trophies following the death of Cecil the lion at the hands of a
Minnesotan dentist near one of Zimbabwe’s national parks. France is the
first EU state to implement such a ban. In March, Australia also banned
their import.

Between 2010 and the 2013, the last year for which data is available, more
than 100 such lion trophies were imported to France.

Lionaid, a UK-based charity that is calling for the UK to follow suit with
a ban on lion trophy imports, said it was “overjoyed” by the move.

A spokeswoman said: “Within the EU, France was a major importer of such
trophies and we expect that wild lions will now find themselves safer
without the presence of French trophy hunters.

ALERT: November 17 Hearing at Capital on Eliminating Back Tags and Eliminating Age Requirements for Kids Being Mentored into Killing & More

Originally posted on Wisconsin Wildlife Ethic-Vote Our Wildlife:


Citizens can find their Senate and Assembly members’ contact information in the upper right-hand corner of the Wisconsin Legislature home page here to comment on this legislation. Citizens can organize at if they wish to work toward fair participation in governing our public lands.

When the “sportsman” committee meets to vote on AB433 and the trapping bill to encourage more mentorship of trapping to children, Tuesday, November 17, they will also hold a hearing on dropping backtags from hounders and on another bill eliminating age requirements for children to be mentored into killing our wildlife…two more hearings in the same meeting where they vote on whether to criminalize citizens for documenting the godawful policies the legislature has legalized that are just animal cruelty. Criminalize peaceful citizens for photographing animal cruelty on their own public lands purchased 94% by wildlife watchers – with cruelty and suffering of our wildlife to…

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