Audubon Action Alert: Stop Cormorant Slaughter

Audubon logo | ACTION ALERT
STOP CORMORANT SLAUGHTER
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Double-crested Cormorant with eggs

A Double-crested Cormorant protects its eggs on East Sand Island.

Tell the Army Corps of Engineers that you oppose the plan to kill 16,000 cormorants.

Take Action

Dear Jim,

The Army Corps of Engineers is planning to kill 16,000 Double-crested Cormorants—more than 25 percent of the entire western North American cormorant population—in a misdirected effort to reduce avian predation on endangered salmon. The cormorants live and nest on East Seal Island, a globally-significant Important Bird Area (IBA) in Oregon’s lower Columbia River estuary. While cormorants do prey on salmon, the fish are endangered because of dams, pollution, habitat loss, and an array of other factors—not because of the cormorants.

Write to the Army Corps of Engineers today to oppose their plan to kill 16,000 Double-crested Cormorants.

According to the Audubon Society of Portland, which is closely tracking this issue, “It is time for the US Army Corps to do a ground-up review of its entire approach to managing birds in the Columbia Estuary.” Audubon opposes the Corps’ Alternative C, which emphasizes lethal control, and favors Alternative A, no action, until such time as the Corps and its partners can review and rebuild their strategy for management of avian predation on fish on a regional scale. Such a strategy needs to be based on sound science, fully employ and evaluate non-lethal measures of reducing avian predation, and consider a full range of alternatives beyond manipulation and control of native wildlife.

Send your public comments to the Army Corps today to oppose their plan to kill thousands of cormorants at East Sand Island!

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