Maybe It’s Time to Take Animal Feelings Seriously

http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/02/

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Dogs can read human emotions. So, it appears, can horses. Whales have regional accents. Ravens have demonstrated that they might be able to guess at the thoughts of other ravens — something scientists call “theory of mind,” which has long been considered a uniquely human ability. All of these findings have been published within the past several weeks, and taken together they suggest that many of the traits and abilities we believe are “uniquely human” are, in fact, not so unique to us.

That statement probably sounds as if it is veering perilously close to anthropomorphism, and if you know anything about research concerning animal behavior, you likely know this: Anthropomorphism is bad. Animals are animals, and people are people; to assume that an elephant, for example, experiences joy in the same way a human does is laughably unscientific. This has been the prevailing mode of thought in this line of scientific inquiry for most of the last century — to staunchly avoid, and even ridicule, any research project that dared to suggest that animals might be thinking or feeling in the same way that humans do.

But new studies like these, along with a slew of recent books by respected biologists and science writers, are seriously considering the inner lives of animals. Now some prominent scientists are arguing that, though the impulse was well-intentioned, decades of knee-jerk avoidance of all things anthropomorphic may have mostly served to hold this field back. “It ruined the field,” biologist and author Carl Safina told Science of Us. “Not just held it back — it’s ruined the field. It prevented people from even asking those questions for about 40 years.”

The theme of Safina’s book Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel pairs nicely with a forthcoming title from famed primatologist Frans de Waal called Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? Both scientists make the case for something the biologist Gordon Burghardt called “critical anthropomorphism” — using your own human intuition and understanding as a starting point for understanding animal cognition. “Thus, saying that animals ‘plan’ for the future or ‘reconcile’ after fights is more than anthropomorphic language: These terms propose testable ideas,” de Waal writes.

More:   http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/02/

6 thoughts on “Maybe It’s Time to Take Animal Feelings Seriously

  1. I think that the human “idea” that gosh, gee, animals can and do feel “as we humans do” should really say: NEW CONCEPT: we have now discovered that some humans are actually capable of the same feelings, emotions, and maybe even somewhat close to the intelligence of non-humans.” So there! The non-humans are far more ancient, more complex, more in-depth, and as Henry Beston put it: more complete than any of Homo sapiens:

    “We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. … In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with the extension of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear.”

    http://www.foranimals.org

  2. As time goes on, I have less and less reason to believe that humans are special in any way except for our own egos and skewed sense of importance in the world. It frightens me to know that animals are aware of how violent we can be when we harm them, and that quite possibly, in many instances, they have more sensitivity then we do.

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