It’s Not Just Subtropical Cornwall — Climate Zones Everywhere are on the March Poleward

robertscribbler

A few weeks ago, the University of Exeter found that parts of Cornwall, England had become subtropical. The study stated that since average temperatures had risen to above 10 degrees Celsius (50 Fahrenheit) for periods of time longer than seven months, this part of England situated on a latitude line north of most of Newfoundland has become part of a climate zone that during the early 20th century extended as far south as the southern tip of Florida.

Seemingly oblivious to the new oddity and possible peril implied by such a significant climate shift, the study went on to cheerfully observe that:

Parts of Cornwall have become subtropical since 2000 and this could create opportunities to grow new, unusual plants. Sunflowers, maize, grapevines and tea are already grown in the Duchy.

The study also pointed out that the added heat might present a problem or two, instances that…

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2 thoughts on “It’s Not Just Subtropical Cornwall — Climate Zones Everywhere are on the March Poleward

  1. Pingback: Rooks in Cornwall video | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Cornwall garden birds slow motion video | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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