Typical pr bs: Trophy hunting of lions can conserve the species, report suggests

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160922124408.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fplants_animals%2Fanimals+%28Animals+News+–+ScienceDaily%29

Sure.
Date:
September 22, 2016
Source:
University of Kent
Summary:
Trophy hunters can play an important role in lion conservation, researchers have shown. These findings may surprise the public, but most lion conservationists think trophy hunting could play a key role in conserving this species because lions need large areas to thrive, and managing this land is expensive. The new work shows land under long-term management for trophy hunting can help fill this shortfall.
Share:
FULL STORY

The findings of this report may surprise the public, but most lion conservationists think trophy hunting could play a key role in conserving this species because lions need large areas to thrive, and managing this land is expensive. Their work shows land under long-term management for trophy hunting can help fill this shortfall.
Credit: © Vasilev Evgenii / Fotolia

One year after the worldwide controversy when an American dentist killed Cecil the Lion in Zimbabwe, the DICE team says hunting works but only when hunting companies are given long-term land management rights.

Dr Henry Brink and Dr Bob Smith from DICE (the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology), and Professor Nigel Leader-Williams from the University of Cambridge’s Department of Geography, studied lion population trends in Tanzania’s Selous Game Reserve.

This protected area is divided into blocks in which hunting rights are allocated to different companies. Their study showed that blocks under short-term allocation were over-hunted. In contrast, lion trophy hunting levels were sustainable in blocks owned by the same company for 10 years or more, thereby also maintaining important habitat for this threatened species.

Dr Brink said DICE’s research shows that those who have secured long-term use rights to natural resources are more likely to manage them sustainably. This is an important lesson for lion conservation, as loss of habitat means this species is increasingly restricted to protected areas.

Dr Smith added that their findings may surprise the public, but most lion conservationists think trophy hunting could play a key role in conserving this species because lions need large areas to thrive, and managing this land is expensive. Their work shows land under long-term management for trophy hunting can help fill this shortfall.

This research also supports calls to change the hunting fee system in Tanzania. Nigel Leader-Williams explained that at present, the government sells hunting block fees cheaply, and raises more by setting high quotas and high fees for each trophy animal shot, which encourages those who are only allocated blocks over the short-term to shoot more lions, at the expense of long-term sustainability and profits. Increasing block fees, reducing trophy fees and reducing the hunting quota could bring in the same tax revenue, while reducing the temptation of hunters to over-use lions.

7 thoughts on “Typical pr bs: Trophy hunting of lions can conserve the species, report suggests

  1. Hunting perpetuates hunting, the recreational killing of wildlife. It is brutal, barbaric, senseless, not sporting, not a sport, not a wholesome activity for individuals or family, not fair chase in any form, under any circumstances. Canned hunting, is as bad or worse, than any other form. It is time so-called civilization gave up the killing tradition of hunting. Only about 6% of the population in the USA continue this killing tradition. It is time the other 94% end the barbarity. Much less of the population can afford the travel, outfitter, travel expenses of trophy hunting.

  2. We waste too much of our time reading about those whose main aim is to destroy natural systems with thrir moronic theories.

  3. This idea is a variation on a theme. When conservationists started working on saving the iconic animals of Africa, they were often accused of being culturally insensitive western elitists, or neo-colonialists, who cared more for animals than people. Some of the groups, such as the Wildlife Conservation Society, decided that the cooperation of the citizens had to be earned, and one method was to make sure they benefitted from conservation plans. One suggestion was to turn animals into resources to make them “pay their own way,” in essence. Suggested methods included ecotourism, trophy hunting, and collaborating with businesses, such as logging, to create income for the country and its people while “managing” the amount of killing.

    Anyone interested in one example of the idea in action (and of the associated problems and the “selling out” of environmental and conservation organizations) should read “EATING APES” by Dale Peterson. He recounts how difficult it was, and is, to control the bush meat trade, how cooperating with some businesses such as logging, can actually make the problem worse, and how some conservation groups cave in to the corporations and at the same time paint a rosy picture of progress to their members to gain donations.

    Another great example is Dian Fossey’s “GORILLAS IN THE MIST” and Farley Mowat’s “WOMAN IN THE MIST” AND “VIRUNGA.” Those books tell of Fossey’s love for the gorillas, her tireless work to save them, and her fight with poachers, government officials, and even other scholars, that eventually led to her murder.

  4. This may seem like going off on a tangent but here goes. Ok let’s bring back the slave trade, historically a lucrative business and one that provided a means to keep certain populations down in their native habitat. And before you come at me with pitchforks, I am not only talking about the slaves of Africa by the Europeans but all cultures that partook of the trade. The targets? Hmm let’s say those stricken with poverty, debt, homelessness and are deemed by society to be useless or a drain on national resources. But slavery really doesn’t sound that great so how’s about whatever profits made from the capture, trade and total profits garnered from cheaper labour by slave owners goes towards hospitals, affordable housing and educational institutions? A fraction of the tax would also be put towards the welbeing of people targeted by the slave trade providing them with medicine, basic shelter and protection from illegal take by black market groups.
    It still sounds pretty bad doesn’t it?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s