About Exposing the Big Game

Jim Robertson

The Rains of Antarctica are Coming — Warm Summer Storms Melted Texas-Sized Section of Ross Ice Shelf Surface During 2016

robertscribbler

“In West Antarctica, we have a tug-of-war going on between the influence of El Niños and the westerly winds, and it looks like the El Niños are winning. It’s a pattern that is emerging. And because we expect stronger, more frequent El Niños in the future with a warming climate, we can expect more major surface melt events in West Antarctica (emphasis added).” — David Bromwhich, co-author of a recent study identifying massive summer surface melt in West Antarctica during 2016.

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If you’re concerned about human-caused global warming, then you should also be concerned about ice. In particular — how warming might melt a miles-high pile of the frozen stuff covering the massive continent of Antarctica.

During recent years, scientists have become more and more worried as they’ve observed warming oceans eating away at the undersides of floating ice sheets. This particular process threatens numerous cities and coastal…

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GRIZZLY BEARS INCH CLOSER TO GREAT FALLS, MONTANA

On June 1, a pair of young grizzlies turned up at the mouth of Box Elder Creek, where it enters the south side of the Missouri River. That’s 12 miles northeast of Great Falls—and roughly where Pvt. Hugh McNeal, a member of the Lewis and Clark expedition, ran into a grizzly bear in July 1806, when the expedition passed through the area on its homeward journey.

Grizzlies getting closer to old Great Falls stomping grounds


CLOSE Grizzly bears are inching closer to Great Falls, Montana’s third largest city, where two centuries ago they…www.greatfallstribune.com

It’s just the natural expansion of a healthy, growing grizzly bear population that’s putting them in closer proximity to people, FWP’s [Mike] Madel said.

“I think these bears are searching for areas to develop new home ranges,” he said.

Historically, grizzly bears occupied grasslands like Great Falls all the way to the Mississippi River but they’ve been gone for more than 100 years.

In recent years, grizzly bears have been traveling river corridors like the Sun, Marias, Dearborn and Teton rivers east of the Rocky Mountain Front to the high plains.

The expansion onto the plains has come as the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem population of grizzly bears of northwestern and northcentral Montana continues to recover.

The population, currently listed as threatened, is more than 1,000 bears and growing at about 2 percent a year.

https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/1*ey8anzoCPb0Mw1OlwTXsrQ.png

Urge your members of Congress to end the U.S. commercial shark fin trade!

The Extinction Chronicles

Sharks are amazing ocean predators, and they’re some of the most powerful creatures in the sea. But even they can’t survive the brutal practice of shark finning.

Shark finning is a gruesome practice. It involves catching sharks, hacking off their fins and tails – usually while they are still alive – and throwing them back in the water. Unable to swim, the sharks then bleed to death, starve or drown. This brutal killing of our oceans’ apex predators must stop!

Urge your members of Congress to end the U.S. commercial fin trade at the national level!

Although shark finning is already illegal in U.S. waters and the possession and sale of shark fins is banned in eleven states and three territories, huge quantities of fins are still imported to this country every year. In fact, globally, as many as 73 million sharks are killed for their fins each year.

HELP…

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Gov’t to ban live bird trades at midnight

The Extinction Chronicles

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20170611000295

The government said Sunday it will ban the trade of live birds for two weeks starting midnight Sunday to prevent the further spread of bird flu.

The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs announced the ban as the highly pathogenic avian influenza has spread to 21 farms in 10 days.

In this photo provided by the South Gyeongsang provincial government, a quarantine official restricts access to a farm suspected of having chickens infected with avian influenza in Goseong, 466 kilometers southeast of Seoul, on June 11, 2017. (Yonhap)

The measure is an extension of a ban the government placed last week on the trade of birds at traditional markets and restaurants that raise their own chickens and ducks.

The ministry said it will also ban the transportation of live birds nationwide, rather than only in areas affected by the disease.

Under the new measures, vendors who wish to…

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Grizzly chases group of hikers and their dog in Banff

The Extinction Chronicles

Remember the bear that chased the woman and her dogs last month? Well, she has struck again.

Now notorious, bear No. 148 chased a group of hikers and their dog Momo on Sunday during a hike near Mount Norquay in Banff National Park.

When they first encountered the large bear, the group of three began to slowly pack away, but quickly turned to running when the mammal didn’t stop advancing.

“When we noticed that it was chasing us, we just tried to keep the pace and not panic,” Dominic Cyr, one of the hikers, told CTV. “Usually you are not supposed to show your back and we were not supposed to run but at the same time it was coming toward us.”

When the animal charged one of the hikers, the group was forced to release their dog, Momo. The grizzly followed the dog, giving the…

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Animal rights advocates protest killing of bear in Union Beach

HAZLET — About 36 animal rights advocates lined the north bound side of Route 36 at Poole Avenue in Hazlet Thursday evening to protest the death of a black bear on Memorial Day weekend.

Car horns blared in support of the group, while others jeered. A passerby yelled, “Go home.” One protester’s response: We’re in New Jersey, this is our home.

The bear was killed by Union Beach police on May 28, after a four-hour stakeout, and after police were denied assistance from the New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife, police have said.

Lauretta Iavarone, a local business owner from Red Bank, said her conscience motivated her to attend the protest. She said the killing of the bear was a real shame.

“Even though I do understand the parameters, it’s very sad and it makes you sad,” Iavarone said.

Janine Motta, programs director at the Animal Protection League of New Jersey, said they organized a protest to raise awareness about bear populations being relocated and growing in new areas, and to tell people that the state isn’t providing tools to mitigate this situation.

“This really has to be exposed and has to be talked about more,” Motta said.

Motta said the local police department has told her the department is very responsive and open to having a conversation about bear safety education programs and using nonlethal options in the future.

She said state officials refused to tranquilize the bear, because the incident was reported at night. It was also on Sunday.

This particular bear was obviously part of the state’s relocation effort, because it was registered in Stillwater, which is too great a distance for a bear to travel undetected and without incident, Motta said.

Susan M. Kearney, a member of Bear Education and Resource who helped organize Thursday’s event, said the overall response from the Union Beach community has been very positive.

“I think it was a great turnout. It’s more people than we expected,” Kearney said.

The bear was first spotted on May 27 near Edmunds Avenue.

Around 10 p.m. that day, Union Beach police sent a warning to local residents to stay away from the animal. Then police contacted state Fish & Wildlife for assistance — requesting the state tranquilize and relocate the bear. Fish & Wildlife denied the local request saying, “this is outside of our protocol,” according to a police department Facebook post.

The statement further said the state department provided “rudimentary” instructions on how to handle the situation, which included: Warn homeowners and pedestrians about the situation, turn emergency lights away from the animal and follow its movements from a safe distance.

The local officers followed these suggestion “to the letter,” the police wrote on Facebook.

After hours of monitoring the bear from a safe distance, the animal headed toward Florence Avenue, a busy area inundated with residents and weekend traffic.

The police department post further said the decision to put the bear down “was not made lightly. However, the safety of residents and their families must always take top priority.”

Another large bear was spotted in Middletown on Friday, May 26, but it’s unclear whether it was the same animal.

David J. Del Grande may be reached at ddelgrande@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @SLOSONE. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Dr. Neal Barnard explains ‘The Cheese Trap’ at Madison’s Vegan Fest Saturday, June 17, 2017.

Gallery

This gallery contains 3 photos.

Originally posted on Wisconsin Wildlife Ethic-Vote Our Wildlife:
The life of a veal calf, taken from its mother, put into isolation and knowing nothing of this world but this horror. “(Break your cheese addiction) to lose weight, tackle cholesterol, skin…

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Bear hunters buy legislators to rule killing fields, loosen gun laws

Wisconsin Wildlife Ethic-Vote Our Wildlife

59270ac6ad5c3.image“Influence Peddler of the Month (May 2017): Wisconsin Bear HuntersAssociation” ~ Wisconsin Democracy Campaign

According to the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, the Bear Hunters Association buys legislator loyalty to their agenda.

“Since the Bear Hunters conduit began operating in 2000, it has funneled nearly $369,000 in large individual contributions of $100 or more to legislative and statewide candidates through 2016. Most of the contributions — about $265,400 or 72 percent — went to Republican candidates. … In addition to the group’s lobbying activities, the Bear Hunters also operates a conduit, which is a legal check bundling outfit that may funnel an unlimited amount of individual contributions to legislative and statewide candidates,” the organization reports.

Lobbyist Bob Welch, a former GOP state senator, represents the Bear Hunters Association, which has 3,000 members. He also lobbies for the Wisconsin Firearm Owners, Ranges, Clubs and Educators (FORCE), which is the National Rifle…

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South Korea to cull nearly 190,000 farm bids to contain bird flu

The Extinction Chronicles

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-birdflu-southkorea-idUSKBN18Y06M

South Korean health officials carry chickens at a poultry farm where a birdflu virus broke out in Ulsan, South Korea, June 5, 2017. Picture taken on June 5, 2017.  Yonhap via REUTERS

South Korea’s agriculture ministry said on Wednesday it has ordered a cull of 186,100 farm birds to prevent the spread of bird flu after more cases of the highly pathogenic H5N8 bird flu were confirmed.

The order comes after the government raised the country’s bird flu alert level to the highest level on Monday when the first bird flu case found since early April was confirmed as the H5N8 strain.

As of Wednesday, a total of five cases of highly pathogenic avian flu had been confirmed in the country’s four regions, the agriculture ministry said in a statement.

The additional cull will take the total number of birds killed since the latest outbreak began in November last year to 38 million, said an agriculture ministry spokesman Lee Ju-myeung, equal to more than a fifth of Korea’s total poultry population.

However, Lee said a further mass culling was unlikely as…

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Fox hunting another battleground in U.K. general election

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2017/06/07/fox-hunting-britain-election/102545374/?siteID=je6NUbpObpQ-yqNY7JW.vlpBFQPw1i8utA

, USA TODAYPublished 6:05 a.m. ET June 7, 2017

LONDON — One of the sleeper issues in the United Kingdom’s parliamentary election Thursday is the future of that most iconic British tradition: the fox hunt.

The image of red-coated riders — bugles blaring, hounds barking, steeds galloping through the lush countryside — is familiar around the world. Tally-ho! Trouble is, chasing actual foxes was banned more than a decade ago because of a campaign by animal-rights activists.

Now, traditionalists are lobbying to bring back the real thing, and they have an advocate in Prime Minister Theresa May, whose Conservative Party hopes to defeat the Labour Party and its leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who called fox hunting a “barbarity” and vowed to keep it outlawed.

Hunting foxes with more than two dogs was banned in England and Wales in 2004 by the then-Labour government, with the measure going into effect in 2005. Hunters and their dogs instead could follow a trail of fox urine. May has pledged to hold a vote in Parliament on overturning the ban.

Animal rights groups also were infuriated when May said last month that she supports using real foxes again. “I was brought up in the countryside and yes, I do support fox hunting,” she said.

The Labour Party is urging people to sign a petition against overturning the ban.

Emily Whitfield-Wicks, 47, a photographer from Cornwall in southwestern England, where fox hunting is popular, said overturning the ban is “completely and utterly unnecessary.” She said the hunters keep their tradition alive with the hounds following a trail. She said foxes are still killed in order to get urine for the trails from their bladders.

“It’s just inhumane. They (the dogs) get to the fox and they rip it apart and that’s a horrible, horrendous way to die,” she said.

The Countryside Alliance, which promotes rural issues, said a near record 250,000 people attended last year’s Boxing Day hunts traditionally held the day after Christmas. That was despite a poll in September showing 84% of voters believe fox hunting should not become legal again.

Animal-rights advocates said more than 4,000 people marched in central London late last month, calling on May to keep fox hunting illegal, although the Countryside Alliance contests that figure.

A poll this month by market research firm Survation said half of voters were less likely to vote for a candidate who wanted a return to fox hunting, and 67% of voters believe it should remain banned.

Polly Portwin, a spokesperson for the Countryside Alliance, said foxes have no natural predators and are considered a pest in rural areas, killing lambs, chickens and other animals.

“We don’t believe it’s a good law,” she said of the Hunting Act 2004. “There are things about it that don’t make a lot of sense. For example you can chase a fox with two dogs, but you can’t chase it with three.”

She said the law allows shooting and snaring animals, methods she says are “far more cruel,” than hunting with dogs. With shooting and trapping, animals can be maimed and suffer a slow, agonizing death, Portwin said.

“Hunting has become one of the big issues in this election, and it is now clear that it is an extremely toxic one for any pro-hunt candidate,” said Eduardo Goncalves, chief executive of the League Against Cruel Sports, a British animal welfare charity.

The politicians need to hear from us LOUD & CLEAR – we will NOT vote for more animal abuse & cruelty. RT to stand up for animals

Goncalves said the group estimates an average of 16,000 incidents of illegal hunting occur each year since the ban began. The argument that fox hunting has anything to do with animal control is “a ruse,” he said.

“The reality is that fox hunts actually capture and raise foxes so they always have foxes to chase,” he said. “Foxes are not pests as they substantially help the rural economy by predating on rabbits, which in some places may cause agricultural damage.”

The Farmers Union of Wales is also calling for an end to the hunting ban. Wyn Jones, a farmer in Wales, said 114 of his lambs have been killed by foxes over the past four years, according to the Farmer’s Guardian.

“Those who dismiss this evidence and argue against a change … demonstrate a willingness to sacrifice animal welfare and the incomes of hard-working people,” Glyn Roberts, the union’s president, said in a statement.