About Exposing the Big Game

Jim Robertson

Rescuers spent night on South Fork with injured hunter

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

Park County Search and Rescue volunteers prepare to get a lift home after hiking 2 miles from the scene of a rescue in the South Fork area earlier this month. A team of six rescued an Iowa man after he broke his leg in a fall during an elk hunt.

Park County Search and Rescue volunteers prepare to get a lift home after hiking 2 miles from the scene of a rescue in the South Fork area earlier this month. A team of six rescued an Iowa man after he broke his leg in a fall during an elk hunt.COURTESY PHOTO

PostedThursday,October 22, 20208:15 amByMark Davis

A recent rescue mission in the backcountry of the South Fork highlighted the importance of being prepared — and the commitment of Park County volunteers.

After a hunter shot an elk on Friday, Oct. 9, his guide returned to camp to get horses to pack out the trophy. In the meantime, while trying to reach his harvested elk, the hunter slid down a steep ravine and snapped his lower right leg.

When the guide returned, he found the elk, but couldn’t find his client. He went back to camp, thinking the hunter had…

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Mountain lion stalks hunter in southern Colorado

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

CPW reports 62 sightings in the state this month

ByJohn Meyer,The Denver PostOct 22, 2020, 8:45 am798Shares

Steve Shively captured this photo of a mountain lion while hunting in southern Colorado. (Provided by Steve Shively)

A man being stalked by a mountain lion in southern Colorado on Sunday lived to tell about it — and post a two-minute Facebook video capturing the encounter.

The incident occurred while Steve Shively was scouting for elk and changing cards in his trail cameras near Bayfield, which is between Durango and Pagosa Springs.https://dec8935215e61065871fbc0b11b07356.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

“After changing the memory cards and rustling around in the leaves, I stood up and turned around slowly, scanning the woods behind me,” Shivelywrote in his Facebook post. “Suddenly, I spotted this motionless mountain lion crouched down behind a rock, ready to pounce on me…

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U.S. reports more than 83,000 coronavirus cases, record daily total, as experts warn of difficult winter

PUBLISHED SAT, OCT 24 202010:22 AM EDTUPDATED 2 HOURS AGONoah Higgins-Dunn@HIGGINSDUNNNate Rattner@NATERATTNERKEY POINTS

  • The U.S. reported more than 83,700 new Covid-19 cases on Friday, passing the last record of roughly 77,300 cases seen in mid-July, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.
  • Amid the growing trend in cases, health experts are warning that the U.S. could be in for a difficult winter.
  • The increase in cases in several states are leading to more hospitalizations and will ultimately lead to more deaths, White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said Friday.
U.S. National Guard Cpl. Kyle Zahn of the 157th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, physician assistant (PA) Harrison Pham, and certified nursing assistants (CNAs) Jermaine LeFlare and Shameka Johnson process nasal swab samples at a drive-thru testing site

U.S. National Guard Cpl. Kyle Zahn of the 157th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, physician assistant (PA) Harrison Pham, and certified nursing assistants (CNAs) Jermaine LeFlare and Shameka Johnson process nasal swab samples at a drive-thru testing site outside the Southside Health Center as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 21, 2020.Bing Guan | Reuters

The U.S. reported a record-breaking number of new coronavirus cases on Friday, continuing an alarming surge and stoking concerns from health experts that the nation could be in for a difficult winter.

The country reported more than 83,700 new Covid-19 cases on Friday, passing the last record of roughly 77,300 cases seen on July 16 as the U.S. grappled with outbreaks in Sun Belt states, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

“I think we’re in for a very hard stretch here,” Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the former U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner, told CNBC on Friday evening. “I think the winter is going to be very difficult.”

Chart showing daily new coronavirus cases in the U.S. with data through October 24, 2020.

Coronavirus cases grew by 5% or more over the past week in 37 states as of Friday, according to a CNBC analysis of Johns Hopkins data that uses a weekly average to smooth out fluctuations in daily reporting.

Some states, like California and Alabama, have been working through a backlog of tests that were added to Friday’s count, pushing the nation’s total higher, according to their data dashboards. However, the nation is now reporting roughly 63,200 daily new cases based on a weekly average, a more than 14% increase compared with a week ago.

While Covid-19 testing is up nearly 13% from Oct. 1, new cases have risen at a much faster rate. The seven-day average of new infections is up 51% over that same period, according to Johns Hopkins data.

“I think we’re going to bear a lot more infection … and the health-care system is going to have to bear the brunt of this burden, because I don’t think you have the popular will for stay-at-home orders or broad mitigation,” Gottlieb said, adding that the virus’ spread would slow “if everyone would just wear masks.”WATCH NOWVIDEO00:58Daily death statistics from Covid this winter could be staggering: Dr. Scott Gottlieb

The recent surge is a “distressing trend” that is likely due to “smaller, more intimate gatherings of family, friends and neighbors” that are moving indoors as the weather cools, Jay Butler, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s deputy director for infectious diseases, told reporters on a conference call Wednesday.

The outbreaks are building throughout the country with particular areas of concern in the Midwest, Butler said. As of Friday, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and Wisconsin continue to report the highest number of new cases per capita.

Chart showing daily new coronavirus cases per capita in U.S. states with data as of October 23, 2020.

The increase in cases in several states are leading to more hospitalizations and will ultimately lead to more deaths, White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci told MSNBC’s Chuck Todd on Friday.

Thirteen states reached record high hospitalizations on Friday, based on a weekly average. Many of them are in the West and Midwest, including Iowa, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, Wisconsin and Wyoming, according to a CNBC analysis of Covid Tracking Project data.WATCH NOWVIDEO03:22Here are the chances you’ll get another $1,200 stimulus check

Coronavirus deaths have remained relatively flat in the U.S., though health experts warn fatalities typically lag infections by a few weeks. 

“When you enter the season of the cooler months of the fall and the colder months of the winter, where a lot of activity, out of necessity, is going to be inside as opposed to outside, that’s a difficult and challenging situation to be in because you have a couple of factors against you,” Fauci said.

Chart showing daily new coronavirus cases in the U.S. with data through October 24, 2020.

— CNBC’s Kevin S

The protection of wildlife is not about killing; it’s about cooperation that stops the killing

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

The protection of wildlife is not about killing; it’s about cooperation that stops the killing

By Kitty Block and Sara Amundson

October 23, 2020 0Comments

The protection of wildlife is not about killing; it’s about cooperation that stops the killing

If SCI wants to serve the greater good of wildlife conservation, it should join with us and other organizations in support of the numerous federal and state bills aimed at saving and protecting endangered wildlife worldwide.Photo by iStock.com79SHARES

Our agenda for the protection of wildlife is an ambitious one, focusing on the most serious threats to threatened and endangered animals in the United States and around the world. We’ve invested a lot of energy and resources in the fights to stop the trophy hunting industry in its tracks, to minimize human-wildlife conflict, halt wildlife trafficking, reduce consumer demand for products derived from endangered and threatened species, cripple the shark fin trade, end commercial whaling and other threats to marine life and eliminate…

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Fukushima: Contaminated water could damage human DNA, Greenpeace says

The Extinction Chronicles

BBCOctober 23, 2020

Storage tanks for radioactive water are seen at Tokyo Electric Power Co's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant
The radioactive water has been stored in huge tanks which will fill up by 2022

https://news.yahoo.com/fukushima-contaminated-water-could-damage-094108016.html

Contaminated water from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant contains a radioactive substance that has the potential to damage human DNA, a report by Greenpeace says.

The claim from the environmental campaign group follows media reports suggesting the government plans to release the water into the ocean.

Many scientists say the risk is low but some environmentalists oppose the idea.

The government has not yet responded to the Greenpeace report.- ADVERTISEMENT -https://s.yimg.com/rq/darla/4-5-0/html/r-sf-flx.html

For years Japan has debated over what to do with the more than a million tonnes of water used to cool the power station, which went into meltdown in 2011 after being hit by a massive tsunami.

Space to store the liquid – which includes groundwater and rain that seeps daily into the plant – will fill up by…

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3 of the largest wildfires in Colorado history have occurred in 2020

The Extinction Chronicles

Experts say climate change and a buildup of dead and parched wildland vegetation have contributed to this year’s fires in the West.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/3-largest-wildfires-colorado-history-have-occurred-2020-n1244525

East Troublesome Fire in Colorado sends up huge smoke plume

OCT. 21, 202001:04Oct. 23, 2020, 8:49 AM PDTByMinyvonne Burke

Colorado has seen three of its largest wildfires in state history occur this year, two of which are still growing.

The largest wildfire currently burning in the state is theCameron Peak Fire, which has scorched more than 206,000 acres, according to the fire-reporting siteInciWeb. As of Friday morning, it was 57 percent contained.

The blaze erupted on Aug. 13 and flared up recently due to warm and dry weather, prompting evacuation warnings for several areas. The cause of the fire is still being investigated.

Firefighters in the state have also been responding to the East Troublesome Fire, which has grown to more than…

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Trump Lied and Lied and Lied and Lied. But at Least the Debates Are Over.

The Extinction Chronicles

President Trump is seen on screen through a window at a watch party for the final presidential debate with former Vice President Joe Biden on October 22, 2020, in San Antonio, Texas.
President Trump is seen on screen through a window at a watch party for the final presidential debate with former Vice President Joe Biden on October 22, 2020, in San Antonio, Texas.

BYWilliam Rivers PittTruthoutPUBLISHEDOctober 23, 2020SHAREShare via FacebookShare via TwitterShare via Email

All hail the goddamn “mute” button — although, as far as I could tell, it wasn’t actually used last night.NBC Newsdebate moderator Kristen Welker, who stepped firmly to the plate last night and parked it deep over the center field fence, may not have needed it. According to the debate rules, the button was only there so the candidates (Donald Trump) wouldn’t run roughshod over each other during their allotted two-minute answer segments.

Sure, Trump repeatedly stampeded the conversation during the crosstalk with…

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Manitoba extends its ban on moose hunting 

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

ByRobert Arnason
Reading Time:2minutesPublished:October 22, 2020
News

The province hoped to have a limited hunting season for moose this year, in the Duck and Porcupine Mountain regions, but the moose population hasn’t recovered sufficiently to withstand it. | File photo

Province stopped the moose hunt in 2011 and says species’ population has not yet recovered enough for it to continue

Moose hunting is again banned in Manitoba.

The province hoped to have a limited hunting season for moose this year in the Duck and Porcupine Mountain regions, but the moose population hasn’t recovered sufficiently to withstand it.

The government is also banning night hunting on private land, beginning Oct. 10, as part of the Wildlife Amendment Act called Safe Hunting and Shared Management.

In 2011, Manitoba banned moose hunting in the Duck and Porcupine Mountains and some surrounding regions, along with bans in the north Interlake, Nopiming and Turtle…

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How the debate on the climate crisis ricocheted from Planet Earth to Planet Trump

Analysisby Bill Weir, CNN Chief Climate Correspondent

Updated 2:44 PM ET, Fri October 23, 2020

natural disasters climate change project planet weir orig_00000313.jpg

The future of climate change is here, scientist warns

What we can learn from Covid-19 for the climate crisis

Bill Weir son being born 1

What a father tells his son born during a pandemic

florida meteorologist project planet orig GBS_00022320.jpg
Harbour Air Pilot and CEO Greg McDougall taxis to the water to fly the worlds first all-electric, zero-emission commercial aircraft during a test flight in a de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver from Vancouver International Airports South Terminal on the Fraser River in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada, December 10, 2019. - The plane, which first flew in 1947, became the worlds first commercial test of an all-electric airplane. It is now powered by the magni500, a 750 horsepower (HP) all-electric motor, built by magniX. (Photo by Don MacKinnon / AFP) (Photo by DON MACKINNON/AFP via Getty Images)

(CNN)”We’re running out of time so we gotta get on to climate change,” moderator Kristen Welker said as the final presidential debate of 2020 came to a close.Unintentionally, it was the truest and most tragic statement of the night.And it brought plans from two different planets.”We have the Trillion Trees program,” President Donald Trump began when they were finally asked how they’d save a livable planet. “We have so many different programs.”Content by Trend MicroThis service keeps your computer running smoothlyThe internet really has opened up a whole new world. Literally. Anytime you open up your laptop, you have an entire globe’s worth of information at your fingertips.Content by Charles SchwabBreakaway: Changing Conventions and the Lives of Families through Adaptive SportsWhen Bill Greenberg’s son was born with a rare medical condition, he turned to values of taking action, asking questions and creating the changes needed for himself and others.There were no other programs. Instead, the President hit a gusher of lies, confusion and insistence that the US remain reliant on fossil fuels, despite the overwhelming evidence that the hell and high water of 2020 is just the beginning.

Let's talk about the climate apocalypse

Let’s talk about the climate apocalypse“Global warming is an existential threat to humanity,” former Vice President Joe Biden began, back on Earth. “We have a moral obligation to deal with it.”Biden ran through parts of his plan, from charging stations on highways to retrofitting buildings to save energy use, and focusing on harnessing renewable resources like wind and solar energy.Twelve feet away on Planet Trump, such predictions brought a smile. “I know more about wind than you do and it’s extremely expensive,” the President claimed. “Kills all the birds.”In reality, the US is late to a global boom in offshore wind farms, and turbines kill a tiny fraction of the hundreds of millions of birds taken each year by windows and cats.On Planet Trump last night, “solar doesn’t quite have it yet.” But on Planet Earth earlier this month, a renewable energy company called NextEra was more valuable than ExxonMobil and the International Energy Agency declared that “solar projects now offer some of the lowest cost electricity ever seen.”Running against such arrogant science denial, Biden could probably shoot a spotted owl on Fifth Avenue and not lose support of the Sierra Club. But rather than follow his primary instincts and play it safe and squishy, Biden has absorbed the urgent ideas of Jay Inslee, Bernie Sanders and the Sunrise Movement, rolling out a climate plan bigger than Barack Obama’s by a factor of 20.The Bobcat Fire burned through the Angeles National Forest north of Azusa, California, last month.The Bobcat Fire burned through the Angeles National Forest north of Azusa, California, last month.Uncontrollable gigafires and a conga line of hurricanes make this an easier political lift, but Biden is quick to temper the nightmare of unpredictable weather with the dream of 50,000 electric car charging stations, millions of energy-efficient remodels and lots of green $50-an-hour, union jobs. “It will cost $100 trillion!” Trump said of the plan, inflating Biden’s stated cost by fifty times.

Hurricanes, fires, floods and locusts: Science says climate change is here but the RNC refuses to believe

Hurricanes, fires, floods and locusts: Science says climate change is here but the RNC refuses to believeWith an obvious fear of losing Pennsylvania frackers the way Hillary Clinton lost West Virginia miners, Biden’s been careful not to declare the end of fossil fuel.But he also outlined the damage.The question was about environmental justice, a platform plank elevated by the summer of Black anger after the killing of George Floyd. What would each candidate say to the families of color more likely to live next to toxic industry?”The families that we’re talking about are employed heavily and they are making a lot of money,” Trump replied. “More money than they’ve ever made.”Then came the most personal story of the night.

How climate change impacts people of color 03:21″When my Mom would get in the car, when there was the first frost, to drive me to school, turn on the windshield wipers, there would be an oil slick on the window,” Biden said, describing the health costs of living near the Marcus Hook complex of refineries on the Delaware River as a boy. “That’s why so many people in my state were dying and getting cancer.”Biden shot back at Trump: “It doesn’t matter what you’re paying them. It matters how you keep them safe.”Trump watched Biden intently during this windshield wiper story, and as the moderator tried to segue into the next question, he took the tender moment to attack.”Would you close down the oil industry?” Trump asked.”I would transition from the oil industry, yes.””Oh, that’s a big statement,” the President replied.(Fact check: True. And certain to be repeated in an attack ad near you).”(Oil) has to be replaced by renewable energy over time,” Biden said, repeating the last words for emphasis. “Over time.”But as the moderator said, we’re running out of time. The United Nations climate panel suggests that the planet must cut emissions in half in just 10 years and hitting Biden’s net zero goals by 2035 will require seismic, head-spinning changes in every sector of the world’s largest economy as fossil fuel giants strand trillions in known reserves.”Our health and our jobs are at stake,” says Biden.”They want to knock down buildings and build new buildings with little, tiny small windows,” says Trump.And two planets collide.

There’s A Lot At Stake For The Climate In The 2020 Election

The Extinction Chronicles

    October 22, 20205:00 AM ET

    JEFF BRADYTwitterInstagramTumblrFacebook

    NATHAN ROTTTwitterInstagram

    JENNIFER LUDDENTwitter

    https://www.npr.org/2020/10/22/925468716/theres-a-lot-at-stake-for-the-climate-in-the-2020-election

    Wind turbines near Dwight, Ill. and a pump jack in Cotulla, Texas. The presidential candidates have opposing views on the future of U.S. energy.Scott Olson and Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

    Despite the cascade of other crises this year, climate change has emerged as a key election issue.

    Two-thirds of Americans want the government to domoreabout it, and the same share of Biden supporters say it’s veryimportantto their vote. While not many Trump supporters overall agree, there’s more concern amongyoungerRepublicans.

    The stakes are high as more Americans experiencerecordheat, wildfires, hurricanes and flooding, and the two candidates could not be further apart. Joe Biden calls climate change an existential threat to our health, economy and national security. President Trump continues to question climate science.

    Here…

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