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Jim Robertson

Wisconsin reports 1,165 new confirmed COVID-19 cases Saturday, another single-day record

Exposing the Big Game

Natalie BrophyAppleton Post-Crescent0:001:33https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.400.1_en.html#goog_1674849591

https://www.postcrescent.com/story/news/2020/08/08/wisconsin-coronavirus-1-165-new-covid-19-cases-another-record/3326419001/

Wisconsin health officials reported anadditional 1,165 people have tested positive for COVID-19, another single-day record.

Those positive casesmade up 8.9% of the 13,162 test results reported by the Department of Health Services on Saturday. The seven-day average for positive tests stands at 6.1% as of Saturday.

The state health departmentalso reported Saturday that six more people have died, bringing the state’s total number of deaths to 996. Those who have died as a result of COVID-19 make up 1.7% of all those diagnosed, according to DHS. The majority of deaths are among those 70 and older.https://www.usatodaynetworkservice.com/tangstatic/html/papn/sf-q1a2z32fe45021.min.html

RELATED:Small businesses say masks, distancing are key to protecting and reviving local economies

RELATED:UW-Oshkosh football players, coach deal with canceled season

In total, 59,933 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in Wisconsin. According to the state health department, around 16% of those cases remain active. DHS…

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Wisconsin reports 1,165 new confirmed COVID-19 cases Saturday, another single-day record

Natalie BrophyAppleton Post-Crescent0:001:33https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.400.1_en.html#goog_1674849591

https://www.postcrescent.com/story/news/2020/08/08/wisconsin-coronavirus-1-165-new-covid-19-cases-another-record/3326419001/

Wisconsin health officials reported an additional 1,165 people have tested positive for COVID-19, another single-day record. 

Those positive cases made up 8.9% of the 13,162 test results reported by the Department of Health Services on Saturday. The seven-day average for positive tests stands at 6.1% as of Saturday. 

The state health department also reported Saturday that six more people have died, bringing the state’s total number of deaths to 996. Those who have died as a result of COVID-19 make up 1.7% of all those diagnosed, according to DHS. The majority of deaths are among those 70 and older. https://www.usatodaynetworkservice.com/tangstatic/html/papn/sf-q1a2z32fe45021.min.html

RELATED: Small businesses say masks, distancing are key to protecting and reviving local economies

RELATED: UW-Oshkosh football players, coach deal with canceled season

In total, 59,933 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in Wisconsin. According to the state health department, around 16% of those cases remain active. DHS defines an active case as someone who is still alive, has been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the last 30 days, and still has symptoms or has not been released from isolation. https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Recent research from those studying the virus have found that even after someone has recovered from COVID-19 and no longer has symptoms, it’s possible for the virus to flare up again in some patients and symptoms can return. 

As of Saturday morning, 311 people with COVID-19 were hospitalized, 96 of them in intensive care. An additional 152 patients were hospitalized awaiting the results of a COVID-19 test. 

I can’t believe they print this kind of crap

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

Bear follows two men home in Alaska, destroys family’s house

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Two men “bearly” escaped with their lives after a bear followed them home.

Brandon McVey and Norman Lott were returning to Lott’s mobile home in the Switzer Village Mobile Home Park in Alaska after a night out last week. When the men left the door open — a black bear waltzed in, shocking the men, Lott’s wife and their 10 children.

“Norm, he’s got like 10 kids, and they’re all in the living room,” McVey told the Anchorage Daily News

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Scientists tested 14 types of masks — here are the ones that worked and didn’t

The Extinction Chronicles

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Bandannas, gaiters and knitted masks are some of the least effective face coverings for preventing the spread of coronavirus, according to a new study.

Researchers at Duke University made the discovery while testing 14 different types of masks, according to the study published Friday.

N95 masks, often used by healthcare professionals, worked best to stop the transmission of respiratory droplets during regular speech.

Other good performers at stopping leakage were three-layer surgical masks and cotton masks, which can be made at home, the researchers with Duke’s physics department found.

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In Memory of Animal Rights Activist Shimon Shuchat

AUGUST 4, 2020 BY DONNY MOSS — LEAVE A COMMENThttps://www.facebook.com/plugins/share_button.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Ftheirturn.net%2F2020%2F08%2F04%2Fin-memory-of-animal-rights-activist-shimon-shuchat-tribute%2F&layout=button&size=small&appId=560935960731324&width=67&height=21https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.3c5aa8e2a38bbbee4b6d88e6846fc657.en.html#dnt=false&id=twitter-widget-0&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Ftheirturn.net%2F2020%2F08%2F04%2Fin-memory-of-animal-rights-activist-shimon-shuchat-tribute%2F&size=m&text=In%20Memory%20of%20Animal%20Rights%20Activist%20Shimon%20Shuchat%20-%20Their%20Turn&time=1597011391241&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Ftheirturn.net%2F2020%2F08%2F04%2Fin-memory-of-animal-rights-activist-shimon-shuchat-tribute%2FShare on TumblrSave

The News

Shimon Shuchat, a 22-year-old animal rights activist from Brooklyn, died on Tuesday, July 28th. In spite of being so young, Shimon was one of the most wise, humble, ethical, empathetic and hard-working activists in New York City. He was also extraordinarily smart. No tribute, including this one, could do justice to Shimon.

Animal rights activist Shimon Shuchat

Shimon’s story is different than most. He was raised in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish home in Brooklyn. According to his Uncle Golan, he learned how to read when he was two years old, and he showed unusual signs of empathy when he was a little boy. For instance, he somehow figured out that a leather jacket was made from a cow, and he asked his parents why people would wear that. When he was a teenager, he came across animal cruelty videos that shook him to the core. He became an atheist, and he made the decision to chart his own course in life.

Leaving the insular ultra-Orthodox Jewish community is not easy for anyone, especially a teenager, but Shimon found the courage to transfer from his yeshiva, which was familiar, to secular high school, where he didn’t know anyone. He also immersed himself in the NYC animal rights community, participating in multiple events every week. Ironically, among the first acts of cruelty that he protested was Kaporos, a ritual animal sacrifice performed by the very community in which he was raised.

Shimon Shuchat bears witness to chickens languishing in transport crates

Throughout his childhood, Shimon had a close relationship with his father, Velvel. According to Shimon’s relatives, “Velvel validated and loved Shimon, and always supported him. He would frequently take him on trips, despite tight finances, often using Greyhound buses to bring him to different states to visit animals. Velvel advocated for Shimon when his yeshiva was unprepared to answer Shimon’s difficult questions. His father always lovingly took the time to listen and support Shimon in any way he could.” His extended family said that Shimon “is a shining light and a blessing to this world, and may his memory also be for a blessing.”

In 2015, Shimon was accepted to Cornell, and he brought NYC-style activism to a reserved animal rights club on campus. After college, he returned to NYC and worked in the animal rights movement until he passed away. He talked about going to law school one day.

Animal rights activists Shimon Shuchat and Rina Deych

Shimon was a quiet, shy, and anxious person, but, according to his fellow activists, he stepped far outside of his comfort zone in order to advocate for the animals. Rina Deych, an activist in NYC who mentored Shimon when he joined the movement, fondly recalls a Kaporos protest during which she offered Shimon a bullhorn to lead the chants. “He shyly refused,” Rina said, “But when he didn’t like the accent I used to pronounce a Hebrew phrase, he grabbed the megaphone from me and led the chants for the duration of the protest. His willingness to prioritize the animals over his anxiety demonstrated just how committed and compassionate he was.”

Shimon Shuchat advocating for captive animals and showing his support for LGBTQ equality

His colleague Nadia Schilling, who also served as a mentor to Shimon, said, “Shimon’s work for animals was unmatched by any person I’ve ever worked within the animal rights movement. It’s easy to lose hope and feel defeated in this line of work, but I honestly believed that, with Shimon by my side, we could make this world a better place.”

Shimon Shuchat participates in an Direct Action Everywhere disruption at Whole Foods, protesting the Company’s “humane meat” advertising.

Unaware of Shimon’s anxiety, Nadia asked him to testify in front of the NYC Council in support of legislation to ban the sale of ban foie gras. “He intentionally waited until after he delivered his remarks to confess that public speaking exasperated his anxiety. He knew I wouldn’t have asked if I had been aware of his fear, and he didn’t want to let down me or the animals. That’s how selfless he was.”

Shimon set the bar high for his activist colleagues with his impeccable work ethic and selflessness. He was singularly focused on reducing animal suffering, and he had no interest in the material world or even the basic comforts that most of us take for granted. One summer during college, Shimon asked if he could do an internship with TheirTurn. “I was reluctant because he was so serious and had such high standards, but I wanted to support him,” said Donny Moss. “He worked so efficiently that he completed his assignments more quickly than I could create them. If I didn’t force him to take a break for lunch by putting the food on top of his keyboard, then he would not have eaten.”

Shimon Shuchat phone banking for Voters for Animal Rights (VFAR) in support of the NYC bill to ban the use of wild animals in circuses

Shimon’s asceticism was stunning at times. “One day, while running an errand, Shimon and I walked into Insomnia Cookie, which had just added a vegan cookie to its menu. When I offered to buy him one, Shimon asked me to donate the amount of money I would have spent on the cookie to PETA. Even after explaining that I could buy him a cookie AND make a contribution to PETA, I practically had to use force to get him to eat the cookie, which I knew that he secretly wanted.”

Shimon Shuchat advocating for the use of coins instead of live chickens during a religious ritual called Kaporos

Shimon was painfully humble for someone who contributed so much. “People like Shimon, who work so hard behind the scenes with no public recognition, are the pillars of our movement,” said Nadia.

Perhaps more than anything, Shimon was empathetic. His uncle Golan said that he “felt things extraordinarily deeply” from a young age. One year during a Kaporos protest, Donny witnessed this firsthand when he found Shimon off to the side weeping. “In the face of so much cruelty and suffering, Shimon practically collapsed from a broken heart.”

While delivering his testimony at the foie gras hearing at City Hall, Shimon made a plea that should, perhaps, be his parting message to those he left behind. “Regardless of our ethnicity, race, religion, or political affiliation, we should be unanimous in opposing and condemning cruelty directed at animals, who are among our society’s most vulnerable members.”

Shimon Shuchat participates in an animal rights protest in NYC

Shimon’s father Velvel, Uncle Golan, Aunt Leah, Cousin Debbie, Rina, Nadia, Donny and others who cared about Shimon hope that Shimon, who made a lifetime of contributions in his short, 22 years, is resting in peace in a kinder place.  “Shimon was a shining light and blessing to this world,” according to his family, “May his memory also be for a blessing.”

Shimon Shuchat (bottom right) volunteers at Safe Haven, a sanctuary for rescued farm animals

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

https://www.idausa.org/campaign/wild-animals-and-habitats/latest-news/trophy-hunters-hall-of-shame/?fbclid=IwAR13nDnnoT7jE0_seVxUOmCkPwzA6tAh57Z3CcLTcBL-jxvERdE4KSs9g9k

Trophy Hunter’s Hall of Shame

From reportedly paying thousands of dollars to kill protected animals, to illegally gunning down hibernating bear families in their dens, we are shining a light on some of the most shockingly cruel trophy hunters in recent history.

1. Walter Palmer

Cecil the lion’s infamous murderer has now killed an endangered ram. The face of Walter Palmer (L) was edited out of the picture before it was shared on social media. Credit: Facebook 

The American dentist from Minnesota known the world over for the shameful murder of Cecil the lion is back at destroying the lives of animals. You may remember him from the night of July 1, 2015, when Palmer lured Cecil, a 13-year-old lion, out of the Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe using the scent of an elephant carcass. Palmer…

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World’s largest livestock carrier docks in Timaru

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Alice Geary16:27, Aug 02 2020

The Ocean Drover, the world’s largest livestock carrier, arrived in port at PrimePort Timaru on Saturday.
BEJON HASWELL/STUFFThe Ocean Drover, the world’s largest livestock carrier, arrived in port at PrimePort Timaru on Saturday.

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The world’s largest livestock carrier, the Ocean Drover, entered Timaru’s port on Saturday night for its first visit in two years.

A Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) spokesperson said the Ocean Drover was in Timaru to collect up to 14,000 cattle bound for China.

Saturday’s arrival marked the third time the boat has docked in Timaru. The vessel was due to depart, carrying a mix of dairy and beef cattle, in a few days’ time once loading was complete, they said.

“The Animal Welfare Export Certificate sets stock numbers for this export at no more than 14,000 cattle, predominantly dairy – friesian and jersey – with some beef – hereford and angus,” they said.

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“No export of live animals can proceed until we have conducted a post-loading review to ensure we are completely satisfied with the conditions on board.”

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MPI introduced strengthened requirements last year stating that exporters were required to provide a report on the condition of the animals at 30 days after their arrival at their destination. There are also added conditions because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Ocean Drover is in Timaru to collect up to 14,000 cattle bound for China.
BEJON HASWELL/STUFFThe Ocean Drover is in Timaru to collect up to 14,000 cattle bound for China.

“In response to Covid-19, MPI introduced two further conditions that exporters must meet for their Animal Welfare Export Certificate applications to be granted,” the spokesperson said.

“The master of the ship [is] to provide a contingency plan for a rejection at the port of arrival or a delay in unloading [and] the exporter satisfies MPI that there is unlikely to be any delay in the unloading of the cattle from the ship or movement of the cattle to a quarantine facility after arrival.”

They said the cattle will be accompanied by 10 stock handlers, of whom two are veterinarians.

The exporters had to provide MPI with a back-up plan in case Covid-19 prevented the vessel from entering its destination port.
BEJON HASWELL/STUFFThe exporters had to provide MPI with a back-up plan in case Covid-19 prevented the vessel from entering its destination port.

Livestock exports have been operating for the past few months and the timing of this shipment has not been affected by Covid-19, they said.

MPI did not know where the cattle were coming from, commenting that often a shipment will have stock from more than one farm and from different regions.

“Live animal exports can help in supporting New Zealand farmers to manage stock numbers.”

The Ocean Drover is 176.7 metres long and 31.1m wide and is capable of transporting 75,000 sheep or 18,000 cattle.

Widow recounts call with farmworker husband who died of COVID-19 in Okanogan labor camp

The Extinction Chronicles

UPDATED: Fri., Aug. 7, 2020

These quarters are part of a Gebbers Farms' seasonal labor camp in Okanogan County. This photo was taken before the coronavirus pandemic had arrived and the wearing of masks was required.  (Courtesy of Gebbers Farms)
These quarters are part of a Gebbers Farms’ seasonal labor camp in Okanogan County. This photo was taken before the coronavirus pandemic had arrived and the wearing of masks was required. (Courtesy of Gebbers Farms)
By Hal BerntonSeattle Times

Earl Edwards was a Jamaican farmer who in the winter grew ginger, garlic and other crops on his tropical island nation homeland in the Caribbean. For the past decade, he would head north each year for seasonal work at the Gebbers Farms in Washington’s arid Okanogan County. This year, he did so amid a global coronavirus pandemic that sickened him and – on July 31 – took his life.

His death is now part of an ongoing state investigation into conditions at Gebbers Farms labor camps.

The 63-year-old spent his final days in an isolation camp, talking several times a day to his wife…

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Commentary: Wildlife killing contests aren’t good management

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

Competitions, such as those for killing coyotes, can work against the interests of ranchers and others.

By Dan Paul / For The Herald

The Washington state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s proposal to ban wildlife killing contests statewide, which is now being considered by the state’s Fish and Wildlife Commission, deserves the support of every Washingtonian.

These cruel and grotesque events glorify spree killing and have nothing to do with wildlife management or sportsmanship.

In a killing contest, participants compete for prizes — usually cash or guns — for killing the most animals, the largest animal or some other variant. At several of these gruesome events across the country, undercover investigators with the Humane Society of the United States have witnessed participants gathering to count and weigh the slaughtered bodies, pose for selfies next to piles of dead animals, collect their prizes…

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Spencer police investigate illegal trapping of raccoon

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

SPENCER – Police and the animal control officer are investigating the illegal trapping of a raccoon on Church Street last weekend.

“Unfortunately, it was too severely injured and had to be euthanized,” Sgt. Norman Hodgerney Jr. said Friday.

Hodgerney said a call came in to police just before 1:30 p.m. Aug. 1. The caller said an ailing raccoon, with a chain around its leg, was in the area of 28-30 Church St.

The animal control officer discovered a raccoon with its paw in a leg trap. The officer freed the animal and took it to the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University in Grafton. It was euthanized, the sergeant said.

A detective is speaking to potential witnesses who live in the area, according to Hodgerney.

“We’re trying to figure out who’s responsible for…

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