Chrissie Hynde hits out at ‘tyranny’ of modern animal welfare campaigning

https://www.independent.ie/style/celebrity/celebrity-news/chrissie-hynde-hits-out-at-tyranny-of-modern-animal-welfare-campaigning-36288725.html
“The singer said she was “a little over” the way the cause has
transformed over the years.”

“The Pretenders star Chrissie Hynde has bemoaned the “tyranny” of
animal welfare campaigns as she described how her attitude towards the
cause has changed.
“The US singer, 66, has become known throughout her 40-year career
with the band for her support of animal rights, but now feels a
“little over” the subject.
“She told the Press Association: “My only consistent message since I
began the band was to encourage people not to eat meat, and then over
the years it has informed most of my friendships and relationships.
““I don’t like being in the spotlight unless I am on stage with the
band, otherwise it makes me squirm, so you might as well use the fact
that you’ve got a voice to say something.
““My message has always been the exact same thing, so I’m a little
over the subject, but I’m in for life.”
“She continued: “There is a tyranny now of body awareness and
nutrition. For me it was never about that, it was about animal
welfare, and the (health) benefits of a vegetarian or vegan diet are a
by-product of not abusing animals.”

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COWS ARE INTELLIGENT, EMOTIONAL AND THEY HAVE EUREKA MOMENTS—SO SHOULD WE BE KILLING THEM?

http://www.newsweek.com/cow-cattle-animal-intelligence-science-personalities-emotion-697979

There are brains in the barnyard, according to a literature review published this week about cattle intelligence. The paper summarized a selection of peer-reviewed research that demonstrated bovine cognition, and determined that the animals can have “Eureka” moments, can be optimistic or pessimistic, are affected by painful experiences, protect their calves, and can recognize their friends.

The peer-reviewed paper, called The Psychology of Cows, was published in the journal Animal Behavior and Cognition and was funded by the animal-welfare-education endeavor The Someone Project. The Someone Project describes itself as “Farm Sanctuary’s latest effort to introduce people to who farm animals are.”

Dexter Cattle, a heritage breed, at a farm in Massachusetts.KRISTIN HUGO
The goal of publishing the paper was to improve the general understanding of cow intelligence.

“We wanted to dig into the objective scientific literature [on cattle] and say, ‘What do we know, who are they?’ and then put that back out to the public domain,” said Lori Marino. Marino is a neuroscientist and former faculty member in Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology at Emory University, and is also one of the authors of the paper.

CattleCattle in the foothills of Mount Diablo.KRISTIN HUGO

Marino and Florida State University PhD student Kristin Allen cited more than 200 papers from 22 major journals and summarized indications of cow psychology, personalities, and intelligence. For example, dairy calves run around and play less after they have endured the procedures of disbudding, or having the buds of horns cut out of their head with a hot iron and without anesthesia, according to the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science. The review paper considers the less active, dehorned cattle are pessimistic, whereas the more playful animals are optimistic.

Cattle also can discriminate between people who handle them roughly and who are gentle with them, preferring to stand closer to those who had been gentle with them before. (However, the study indicated that their actions are also partially influenced by the color of the overalls that people are wearing, if they are the color that the gentle or rough person was wearing as well.) When a mother cow sees an unfamiliar vehicle approach, she will also put her body between the vehicle and her calf, presumably to protect it.

Marino also says that cattle can experience “Eureka” moments. In research published in Applied Animal Behaviour Science, researchers observed cattle who were given a reward after completing a task, and gave the same reward to other cattle who had no control over their rewards. By measuring heart rate, they determined that the cattle who could control their own fate got more excited than the ones who were rewarded passively. This could be interpreted as cattle having an emotional reaction to finishing a puzzle, not just getting food.

CalfA calf approaches a photographer.KRISTIN HUGO

It’s notable that, while the literature review cites peer-reviewed research, the paper itself could be influenced by a desire to improve the welfare of farm animals. The Someone Project, which funded the paper, is a joint endeadvor between Farm Sanctuary, a farm animal protection organization that runs three shelters for farm animals like cattle, and the Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy.

Furthermore, in the same issue of Animal Behavior and Cognition, several other authors published their commentaries on the paper, with positive and negative takes. One called it “ a case of over-interpretation and personification,” stating that the authors anthropomorphize the animals, or compared them to humans when they shouldn’t have.

Goliath the former dairy calf sucks on the fingers of animal rescuer Christine Hubbs.KRISTIN HUGO

Another commentary, however, called, Evidence for Cows’ Minds and Hearts: Why Cows Are Far More than Biological Machines, voiced support for the review paper. None of the commentaries suggested that cattle were simply unintelligent, though.

Heather Hill, an associate professor of psychology at St. Mary’s University and an editor of the International Journal of Comparative Psychology, “was very unhappy” when she reviewed the paper. “It’s nice to have this sort of information gathered together, but what was very frustrating was their choice of information that they included, and how they chose to present it,” Hill said. “It was not in my opinion the best representation or the most objective representation.” Furthermore, she noted that any research about things that cattle can’t do isn’t likely to get published at all.

Allen and Marino responded to the commentaries in the same issue of Animal Behavior and Cognition, saying that “a false pretense of scientific objectivity does a disservice to the cow literature.” They agreed that some concerns were valid, but disagreed on others.

BellowA bovine calling at Macedo Ranch in Alamo, California.KRISTIN HUGO

All of the papers mentioned the importance of studying bovine cognition and intelligence, though. Allen and Marino noted that there is much more research done on animals that are not commonly food animals, such as dogs, primates, and dolphins. The animals that we breed, raise, take care of , and eat by the millions should be understood as well. Hill said that it would be nice to have a literature review of cow cognition that was from independent researchers, without a preference for or against animal welfare.

“It’s important for people to understand who [cattle] are and then go on to make a choice about how they want to treat them based upon real evidence,” Marino said. “Not based on impressions, assumptions, biases one way or the other, but to get out there, read the objective scientific data on who these animals are put it in a form that’s interesting and then leaving it up to the public to decide if this information changes how they view and treat these animals either way.”

Maneka Gandhi warns against neglecting animals’ plight

http://www.canindia.com/maneka-gandhi-warns-against-neglecting-animals-plight/

Lucknow, Oct 28 (IANS) Union Child and Women Development Minister Maneka
Gandhi, who is a strong votary of animal rights, on Saturday said that the
time had come for the people to understand that they are ignoring the
plight of the animals at their own peril.

Here to attend an event on animals, their rights and the need to do
something for them, organized by Connect Lucknow, Gandhi said that there
were innumerable experiences, most for them sad, to explicitly warn the
people that even a speck in the animal world, if ignored or slighted, will
return to haunt and hurt mankind in a big way.

“Many a times if a stray dog bites someone, people would shout on ‘why
haven’t I died’ as if I have given birth to these dogs,” she said while
championing the cause of stray dogs, and urging people to be more sensitive
towards them, feed them and even give them shelter after sterilization.

Stressing how the animal kingdom and the human race are interlinked,
Gandhi, citing the example of cockroaches, rats, snakes and stray dogs,
said they were crucial to the eco system as they got rid of dirt, small
insects and mice.

“There is no city that can survive for a day if these dogs are killed…see
what happened in Surat (Gujarat) many years back. The municipal
commissioner got the stray dogs killed and thereafter there was outbreak of
plague,” she said.

Asking people to give up non-vegetarian food, plant more trees, be
compassionate to animals, provide funds to NGOs for animal shelters, she
also urged people to think of the bigger picture on how neglect of animal
rights could lead to a huge imbalance in life of everyone.

Arby’s bringing back venison sandwich for hunting season

 – Arby’s, the restaurant chain that claims “We have the meats,” is bringing back its venison sandwich for hunting season for a second year.

The restaurant chain tested its venison sandwich in five popular hunting states, including Minnesota and Wisconsin, last year. The venison sandwich, featuring thick-cut venison steak and crispy onions topped with a juniper berry sauce on a toasted specialty roll. Arby’s claims the sandwich was so popular it sold out within hours.

This year, Arby’s is releasing the venison sandwich nationwide. It will return to the menu on Oct. 21 and be available until supplies last.

The success of the venison sandwich has prompted Arby’s to add another game meat to its menu. A limited edition elk sandwich, featuring an elk steak topped with blackberry port steak sauce and crispy onions on a toasted specialty roll, will also be available at three locations in the popular elk hunting states of Colorado, Wyoming and Montana.

Discarded Greyhounds Imprisoned, Neglected, and Farmed for Their Blood/Getting every last drop from greyhounds

http://www.ohmidog.com/2017/10/11/getting-every-last-drop-greyhounds/

As if racing their hearts out weren’t enough, some greyhounds are retired to dog blood banks where they lived caged all day long, except for outings to get their blood drawn.

PETA last month exposed one such kennel, The Pet Blood Bank, Inc., in Cherokee, Texas, which houses about 150 retired greyhounds — solely for the purpose of extracting and selling their blood and blood products.

The products, PETA reported, are distributed by Patterson Veterinary Supply, Inc., which did about $3 billion worth of business in 2016.

After the the PETA expose and a story in The Washington Post, Patterson Veterinary Supply announced it would take steps to correct the horrible conditions they described.

bloodbankBut PETA says no steps have been taken, even after they had Paul McCartney send a pleato the company.

Patterson Veterinary Supply initially announced it would terminate business with the The Pet Blood Bank, Inc.

It also promised to support “efforts to ensure that the animals receive appropriate care.” Bu PETA says it has seen no evidence of any such efforts.

The whistle-blower was Bill Larsen, 60, a former employee of the blood bank who went back to work there and was horrified by how conditions had deteriorated.

Larsen, who took the incriminating photos, said he unsuccessfully sought help from local animal shelters and a state agency before contacting PETA. “I just like dogs,” he said, and “hate for any animal to get treated like that.”

The photos show kenneled dogs with open wounds, rotting teeth and toenails curling into their paw pads.

The blood bank was founded in 2004 by Austin entrepreneur Mark Ziller, who said he initially sought volunteers and used a bloodmobile. When that did not turn up enough dogs, the company began using retired greyhounds housed in a kennel on a private farm northwest of Austin, the Post reported.

Ziller said he sold the company in November 2015 to Shane Altizer, whose family owns the farm in Cherokee.

“The Pet Blood Bank had a noble mission: It provided blood for veterinarians to use in lifesaving transfusions,” Ziller tod the Post. After viewing the photos PETA obtained, he added, “To see the animals in that state is beyond depressing.”

Altizer did not deny that the images were taken there, but said they predated his 2015 purchase of the company or were “moment snapshots” unrepresentative of overall conditions now.

Blood banks help save thousands of animals a year, but they are also profit-driven and unregulated.

With more medical procedures being used by vets, transfusions are more often required, and animal blood banks struggle to meet the demand. Only one state, California, regulates such operations and requires annual inspections.

bloodbank2Greyhounds are considered especially desirable as donors because they typically have a universal blood type and have big neck veins that make drawing blood easy.

Veterinarian Anne Hale, former CEO of the nation’s first and largest commercial animal blood bank, said she visited the Pet Blood Bank this summer and was “pleasantly surprised” with conditions there. After viewing the PETA photos and video though, she said, “It appears that the facility was ‘cleaned up’ before our touring … I agree that this facility should be addressed. This certainly suggests that regional, state and/or federal regulation is warranted.”

Former Beatle McCartney, who wrote a letter on PETA’s behalf, wants to see all the dogs removed from the facility.

“I have had dogs since I was a boy and loved them all dearly, including Martha who was my companion for about 15 years and about whom I wrote the song ‘Martha, My Dear,’” McCartney wrote. “I join my friends at PETA in asking you to pay these greyhounds back, and to let them retire from the dirt-floored, barren conditions in which they are kept isolated and alone.”

(Photos and video from PETA)

Also see:  https://investigations.peta.org/greyhounds-farmed-for-blood/

Discarded Greyhounds Imprisoned, Neglected, and Farmed for Their Blood

Imprisoned in an old turkey shed are approximately 150 perpetually penned greyhounds—many already used, abused, and discarded by the notorious dog racing industry—who neurotically spin in circles, jump up and down, cry out, and hide in the jagged old chemical tanks that serve as their only shelter.

VIDEOTAKE ACTION

At a kennel doing business as The Pet Blood Bank, Inc., in Cherokee, Texas, these animals, who’ve already endured lifelong deprivation, are now being exploited for blood products, most of which are distributed by Patterson Veterinary Supply, Inc., a corporate giant with sales of nearly $3 billion in 2016 alone.
Update: On September 22, 2017, one day after PETA exposed the blood farm, Patterson Veterinary Supply announced that “the conditions and treatment described and pictured … are horrific and unacceptable. … We have terminated business with [The Pet Blood Bank, Inc.], and we will work to support … efforts to ensure that the animals receive appropriate care.”
But for nearly a week, Patterson Veterinary Supply ignored questions about the specific ways in which it would assist the dogs. Then, on September 28, 2017, this multibillion-dollar company, which had pledged—in writing—to help the dogs, posted this cop out on a webpage created just a day earlier, which has nothing on it but this disappointing and unacceptable statement.

 

Solitary Confinement, Severe Deprivation

With few exceptions, the greyhounds are solitarily confined in unsanitary dirt-floored wire cages devoid of any form of enrichment.

They are deprived of everything that is natural and meaningful to them, including exercise, companionship, and the opportunity to bond with a human family. Out of boredom and despair, they just dig and chew on the old filthy chemical tanks that serve as their shelter, leaving sharp and jagged edges that sometimes injure them. Some dogs pace, spin endlessly in circles, jump up and down, and cry out when approached. Others are so terrified that they cower and lose control of their bladder or bowels.

 

Missing Piglets, The FBI and The Revolving Door

Many thanks to The Intercept:
An Animal Rights Article from All-Creatures.org

FROM

Veda Stram
October 2017

piglets
Some “factory-farmed” piglets...

I have been a vegan and animal rights activist since January 1989 and am RELIEVED to read this absolutely amazing and thorough post from The Intercept: The FBI’s Hunt for Two Missing Piglets Reveals the Federal Cover-Up of Barbaric Factory Farms.

Thanks to The Intercept for this thorough representation of the links between abusing someone for profit AND ignoring reality for profit AND the revolving door of governmental and industry corruption that profit from ABUSE!

Too many people have been claiming for decades that animal activists are “exaggerating” the horrors animals endure because people choose their taste bud and tradition preferences over civility and decency.

We are now into too many generations of many humans eating animal parts and pieces and secretions several times EVERY day. I am certain there is a provable connection between the eating of the psychological and biological RAGE those animals endure and the rise of violence in this world AND the lack of concern for “others.”

Whether or not there IS that provable connection about ‘eating rage,’ then there is the worse realization that too many people continue to CHOOSE to pay someone to brutalize and slaughter someone because they want to eat parts and pieces of their dead tortured bodies. Or how about paying industries to brutalize and slaughter someones because other someones want their oil, their diamonds, their land, their water?

If you eat “other” animals because you get some kind of personal gratification, what sets you apart from those humans/industries that destroy wild animals, water, air, land for personal/corporate financial gratification?

This MUST END! Being vegan is not a diet, it is not about what/who you eat, it is about CHOOSING civility over domination and violence.

Veganism IS the possibility of a world that works for every one and every thing, with no one and nothing left out.

http://www.all-creatures.org/articles/ar-missing-piglets-intercept.html

The Worst Thing You’re Doing for Animal Rights and the Environment

Photo © Shutterstock

EDITOR’S NOTE:

Nathan Runkle is the founder and president of Mercy For Animals, a foundation that fights for humane treatment of animals. For two decades, Nathan has overseen the organization’s growth into a leading international force in the prevention of cruelty to farmed animals and promotion of compassionate food choices and policies. Here, he demonstrates why we should all care about animal rights.

Most of us care about animal welfare. Whether we empathize most with dogs and cats in shelters, endangered wildlife, or orcas in captivity, the vast majority of us agree that animals matter and animal cruelty is wrong. In fact, a 2015 Gallup study found that a third of Americans believe animals should be given the same rights as people.

BUY THE BOOK

Mercy For Animals

by Nathan Runkle with Gene Stone

What most people don’t realize, however, is that most animal cruelty in America is legal – and that most of us pay for it at least three times a day. The truth is that the factory farming industry now raises and slaughters more than nine billion land animals per year in the U.S. alone. That’s more animals killed every year in America than there are humans on the planet.

The Animal Welfare Act, the main federal animal welfare law, doesn’t provide an ounce of protection for animals raised and killed for food. As a result, factory farmers can legally snap birds’ fragile legs into moving shackles, drag their heads through electrified water, and slit their throats while the animals are conscious. They can castrate pigs without anesthesia, and at most farms, slam piglets’ heads against the floor as the standard method for killing “runts” – all with impunity.

Systematic torture, in the form of overcrowded sheds and isolating cages and crates, is also all too common. The worst are battery cages for egg-laying hens, veal crates for baby cows, and gestation and farrowing crates for mother pigs. Trapped in such confinement systems, animals raised for food are deprived of natural conditions and behaviors, and many can’t even turn around or spread their limbs for nearly their entire lives.“…more animals are killed every year in America than there are humans on the planet.”TWEET THIS QUOTE

If all that animal cruelty doesn’t make you lose your lunch, consider this: According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the livestock sector is one of the largest sources of carbon dioxide pollution and the single largest source of potent greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide. Translation: Animal agriculture is one of the largest contributors to climate change. We can screw in all the squiggly light bulbs we want and ride our bikes to work, but if we’re eating burgers for lunch, we’re doing more to harm the environment than if we switched from a Prius to a Hummer.

Animals release some greenhouse gases themselves, but the entire fossil-fuel-burning industry – complete with semi-trucks, extensive machinery, and factories – deserves the blame. The livestock sector is also among the most wasteful of Earth’s increasingly scarce water. These factors, plus the immense farmed-animal waste that pollutes community waterways and ecosystems surrounding them, endanger future human and nonhuman life alike.

Animal agriculture isn’t just polluting our world; it’s also polluting our bodies. Our country’s largest health crises are all linked to consumption of meat and other animal products. One in three people is obese, one in four will die of heart disease, and nearly forty percent of people will receive a cancer diagnosis. Science irrefutably shows that plant-based diets could prevent and even reverse most cases of these illnesses. In other words, the solution is right under our noses: on our plates.

Numerous studies from top universities and independent researchers have found that eating animal products promotes cancer in many forms. Vegetarians are about forty percent less likely to develop cancer than meat eaters, especially breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Eating animal products, which are high in cholesterol and saturated fat, also substantially raises the risk of heart disease. Forward-thinking doctors are prescribing a whole-food, plant-based diet to prevent and even cure our country’s biggest killer. A diet high in animal protein also raises risk of diabetes by twenty-two percent, while a plant-based diet significantly lowers the risk. I could go on and on about all the health benefits of a plant-based diet, but suffice it to say the research is clear: Animal products threaten our world’s well-being.

It may seem hyperbolic to suggest that a single practice – eating animals – is responsible for most animal cruelty, environmental degradation, and global public health threats. But we can’t deny the science. We know animals feel pain and suffer, we know the causes of climate change and pollution, and we know what’s ailing our own bodies.

The good news is that a major shift toward plant-based diets may be as close to a silver-bullet solution to many of the world’s biggest problems as there could be. By simply leaving animal products off our plates, we can prevent animal suffering, lighten our environmental footprint, and even lengthen our own lives. If enough of us made this shift, we could change the world.

Now all we need to do is trust that our own capacity for change is greater than we think.

Not In My Backyard: The Day My Quiet Cul-De-Sac Turned Into a Bloodbath

By Hope Bohanec, Projects Manager for United Poultry Concerns

I live in a rural area of Sonoma County, California in the small town of
Penngrove. It’s farm country and there isn’t much more in the tiny downtown
block than a burger joint and bars. But it’s a beautiful, peaceful area. The
golden hills glimmer in the distance, and mature, majestic oak trees shade
the
wild turkeys and deer in our neighborhood. My husband and I have been in
this
area for over a decade, and while a miniature horse or a goat in a field is
a
common sight, chickens were not, up until a few years ago. The popularity of
having chickens at home has grown, and now we see flocks of chickens
everywhere.
Across the street, there is a chicken “tractor” (a mobile chicken coop) in a
sprawling field. We often see a colorful collection of chickens here and
there,
wandering and scratching around front yards as we take our evening walk.

So when our new neighbors built a chicken coop in their backyard, I wasn’t
surprised, but I was concerned. Our four duplexes share a laundry, and I
walk
directly in front of this neighbor’s house on a regular basis. He is often
outside in a cloud of cigarette smoke. When the chickens first came, I
braved
inhaling a haze of second-hand smoke to inquire about the birds. He said he
got
them for eggs. I said, “You’re not going to kill them, are you?” He said no,
that he had them just for the eggs. I reminded him that coops need to be
cleaned
daily and that he should adopt chickens if he was going to get any more, but
doubted that he would care one way or the other about something like this
as he
blew smoke away from my direction.

A few months later, I was walking some laundry out to the machines. As I
glanced
in this neighbor’s front yard, he and two other men were standing around a
tall,
green, plastic garbage can. There was a scuffle and I couldn’t quite figure
out
what was happening at first, until I saw his arms spotted in blood and a big
black bird flapping her wings furiously as she was being held upside down by
both men in the garbage can. Her large ebony wings beat desperately against
his
arms. The third man was skinning the sandy colored feathers off another
chicken
and there was a third little body, colorless, headless, featherless, with
her
feet cut off, balanced on the top of the garbage can. I dropped my laundry
basket and screamed, “What are you doing!?!?!” The neighbor was immediately
uncomfortable. He said, “Oh, sorry Hope.” One of the other men looked at me
and
said, “We’re gonna BBQ!”

I ran back to my apartment and grabbed my cell phone and then back to the
scene
of the horror and with trembling hands started taking pictures while I
pleaded
with him to stop. There wasn’t another bird out there, just the three now
still
and silent. The neighbor said these three were the “old ass chickens.” I
assume
he meant they were not laying eggs as frequently as the others in his
backyard.

Through my tears, I reminded him that he had promised he wasn’t going to
kill
the chickens. He didn’t say much, just apologized again. He knows my
feelings as
he sees my vegan bumper stickers every day, and we have talked on a couple
of
occasions about veganism and not killing animals. It seemed to me like he
felt
“caught in the act.” I can only hope that he does feel a degree of guilt
and not
just embarrassment about doing something his neighbor disapproves of.

I was so upset I forgot my laundry basket which sat out in the driveway for
hours and I cried my eyes out. It was sickening to witness. My neighbor
literally had blood on his hands from taking a precious life not fifty feet
from
my front door, and there was nothing I could do about it. The fact that
these
men were executing this repulsive act in a garbage can felt terribly
symbolic of
how they seemed to feel about these birds. They treated them like garbage
and
left their heads, feet, feathers, and other parts of their little bodies to
be
thrown away with the trash.

I called our mutual landlord to complain. He sympathized with me but said
only
that he would tell the murdering neighbor that he should do his killing in a
more private and secluded area of his backyard in the future. I know that
it is
legal to kill animals who are your “property” as long as you do it
“humanely.”
But what can be humane about taking a sentient being’s life? And although
throat
cutting and beheading are considered “humane” methods of killing, they
certainly
are not. Throat slashing is a painful, traumatic way to die, and it can take
agonizing, frightening minutes for someone to bleed out. Killing an animal
who
wants to live can never be humane. This idea that we can “humanely” take the
life of another animal is an outrage. And I am outraged that it is
happening in
my backyard . . . in anyone’s backyard.

The idea that it is somehow better to “kill your own” baffles me. One
argument
my neighbor might use is that his bird had a good life and this was her
“one bad
day.” But what about all the other days of life you are depriving her of?
What
about all the days of sunshine, eating, dustbathing, playing with friends,
and
loving being alive? It’s not just one bad day; it’s denying someone a
lifetime
of experience, robbing them of the full knowledge of life. If we don’t want
our
human life cut short, how can we justify taking the life of another sentient
being who wants to live when it is completely unnecessary and we live
healthier
as vegans?

Another position that people who kill animals themselves take is that the
person
is now aware of the process and “knows where their food comes from.” But
this is
useful only to that person. The animal receives no benefit from this
concept. If
they took care of the animal, fed and cleaned and provided for this animal,
then
a bond of trust was formed between the caregiver and the dependent. To turn
on
someone you care for, and then mercilessly kill them, is a terrible
betrayal of
trust. In fact, it’s the ultimate betrayal. This phrase is the title of my
book
on the subject of small scale animal agriculture, *The Ultimate Betrayal*.
For a
broader, in depth analysis of this issue, I encourage you to read my book
<https://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Betrayal-There-Happy-Meat/dp/1475990936/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1372963043&sr=8-1>
.

I haven’t seen my neighbor since that horrible day, which is unusual as he
is
typically out in his haze of smoke several times a day. I think he has
moved his
habit to the backyard so he doesn’t have to look me in the eye. I hope that
my
reaction made him think deeply about what he did. There is a different
energy
now when I walk past his place and out to the laundry. It feels somber and
sad
knowing what occurred there. It’s horrible to live with but only
strengthens my
resolve to fight for these beautiful birds and help bring about the day when
they no longer suffer at the hands of our neighbors.

__________

Hope Bohanec is the Projects Manager for United Poultry Concerns and author
of
*The Ultimate Betrayal: Is There Happy Meat?*
<http://www.the-ultimate-betrayal.com>


United Poultry Concerns is a nonprofit organization that promotes
the compassionate and respectful treatment of domestic fowl.
Don’t just switch from beef to chicken. Go Vegan.
http://www.UPC-online.org/ http://www.twitter.com/upcnews
http://www.facebook.com/UnitedPoultryConcerns

View this article online
<http://upc-online.org/alerts/170901_not_in_my_backyard.html

If we can’t defend animal rights, we don’t deserve to call ourselves progressives

http://www.salon.com/2017/08/19/if-we-cannot-defend-animal-rights-we-do-not-deserve-to-call-ourselves-progressives_partner/
“The world’s most pervasive form of exploitation, along with its
resultant environmental harm, can’t be laid at the feet of
Republicans, conservatives or those we define as bigots in our
society. That’s because both sides of the aisle participate in the
needless consumption of animals.

“Consumers are increasingly made aware that countless sentient beings,
just like companion dogs and cats, are abused and slaughtered for
products we don’t really need. Marketers convince the public that
animal exploitation is necessary to sustain human life. But it’s not
true.

“This profiteering is a byproduct of unchecked capitalism, producing
food products that cause cancer, contribute to obesity and exacerbate
the diabetes crisis.

“Public consciousness is sorely lagging on the issue. Standing against
the exploitation of sentient beings outside our own species is often
considered superfluous by progressives who embrace radical thought in
other areas. It’s not uncommon to hear a supposed liberal accuse
vegans of not caring enough about humans.”

Galicia’s wild horse roundup pits tradition versus animal rights

herd of wild horses being rounded up in Sabucedo, Galicia, Spain

Photo: avarand/Shutterstock

The hardy Galician horses of northwestern Spain typically spend their days foraging in the rugged surrounding forests and hills. Left to their own devices, they graze and roam free, only once in a while spotted by villagers and the occasional tourist.

Until roundup time.

Once a year, typically in summer, locals in villages throughout rural Galicia trek into the hills to herd the horses back home. For the Rapa das Bestas, or Capture of the Beast, the semi-wild horses are corralled by their rancher owners as villagers celebrate the longstanding ritual.

Records of the event date back to at least the 18th century, but some believe it started even earlier. As the horses are caught, their manes are cut and deloused and foals are microchipped and sometimes branded. Some animals are kept to be sold. The rest are returned to the hills until the roundup is held again the next summer.

According to the New York Times, the ranchers consider letting the animals roam free an efficient way to deal with the underbrush that is prone to forest fires. Although their numbers were as strong as 20,000 just 15 years ago, it’s thought the horses number only about 11,000 today.

The popular annual ritual is coming under fire from animal rights activists who say the horses are mistreated during the rough-and-tumble event. Some even liken it to bullfighting.

Laura Duarte, an official from Pacma, a political party promoting animal rights, told the Times that elements of the roundup are hard to justify.

“We don’t criticize what’s being done, but how it’s been done, because it causes terrible stress to animals that live in the wild and aren’t used to human contact,” she said.

“To brand a horse with hot iron can only cause huge suffering.”

Even if a wild horse roundup isn’t on the same level as bullfighting as far as cruelty is concerned, Duarte said “tradition” is still the same defense given for both.

“Any tradition that harms animals must be reviewed,” she said, “and doing something for a very long time doesn’t mean it shouldn’t now be adapted to our times.”