UPDATE: More info on shooting accident

Image source: Midwest Communications
Image source: Midwest Communications

UNION TOWNSHIP, MI (WTVB) – While a Wednesday night shooting incident in Branch County’s Union Township is still under investigation, Michigan State Police have pretty much determined it was a hunting accident.

The incident was reported at about 9:20 p.m..

After their initial investigation, troopers at the Marshall Post are now reporting it happened as two friends were trying to thin out varmints near Hodunk Road south of Sullivan Road, and that the shot did not come from a nearby residence.

Troopers say one of the hunters was lying down in a field when the other mistakenly thought he was wildlife and fired a small 22 caliber rifle.

They say the man who was shot was not wearing any orange high visibility clothing. He was airlifted from the scene to Bronson Methodist Hospital in Kalamazoo.

The names of the persons involved have not been released.

Michigan State Police were assisted by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, LifeCare Ambulance and the Union City Fire Department.

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Man who shot teen dead in hunting accident 22 years ago loses firearms licence bid

Tuatapere man Brendon Diack ouside the the Invercargill District Court ahead of his unsuccessful bid to get his firearms ...

JOHN HAWKINS/STUFF

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/105296043/Man-who-shot-teen-dead-in-hunting-accident-22-years-ago-loses-firearms-licence-bid

Tuatapere man Brendon Diack ouside the the Invercargill District Court ahead of his unsuccessful bid to get his firearms licence back on Friday.

A Southland man who shot a teenager dead in a hunting accident 22 years ago has lost his bid to get his firearms licence back.

Brendon Diack took police to court in Invercargill on Friday, appealing a 2015 decision to refuse him a firearms licence.

In 1996, Diack admitted to a charge of careless use of a firearm causing 16-year-old Mark Whyte’s death at Tuatapere and was sentenced to two months’ jail and fined $3000.

He also lost his firearms licence at that time.

During Friday’s hearing, Diack said he had applied for his firearms licence “five or six times” since 1996, but to no avail.

A hunter for years before the tragedy, he now wanted to go hunting with his sons and pass on his knowledge, he said.

Judge Mark Callaghan refused Diack’s bid to get his licence back, pointing to the 1996 tragedy and two incidents in 2013 and 2014 to show Diack was not a fit and proper person to hold a firearms licence.

In 2013 Diack, who had a $300,000 a year contracting business, hit a man on the chin who owed him $300; and in 2014 he dug up  gravel he had laid for another client because he was owed $500, the judge said.

His actions, 17 years after the fatal shooting, were irrational and violent and showed he had not learned how to control his aggression, the judge said.

Diack was “possibly a risk to others if he had access to firearms”.

“His actions in 2013 and 2014 indicates he can’t control himself properly and in my view he isn’t a fit and proper person to hold a firearms licence.”

Earlier in the hearing, Diack said there had been a lot of angst in the community since the 1996 tragedy but he believed a lot of people had moved on except for Mark Whyte’s family.

“Jimmy and Shirley [Mark’s parents] are going to hate me for the rest of my days for what I done to their son, I am sorry about that.”

No-one went hunting with the intention of shooting a person, he said.

When people asked him about the incident he always sat down and talked about it and “believe it or not it still brings a tear to my eye … because it’s tragic.”

Apart from wanting to go hunting with his sons, he also wanted his licence back because it gave him the opportunity to speak with different hunters who were on the same page and he wanted to do trap shooting again, he said.

After the accident he had still gone out with hunters “videoing”, but it wasn’t the same, he said.

His lawyer, John Fraser said Diack was an honest and hard working man who in 1996 made a fatal error with a rifle.

Since that time, Diack had managed a business and had a stable home life, Fraser said.

Diack is the Tuatapere fire station chief which Fraser suggested would not be the case without the support of a large number of firefighters and a significant vetting process.

Fraser said the 2013 and 2014 incidents were minor and out of character for Diack and they did not demonstrate a pattern of  behaviour.

However, police lawyer Sarah McKenzie said the offences in 2013 and 2014 tainted Diack’s character when coupled with the the 1996 fatal shooting.

Southland police area commander inspector Joel Lamb said he had spoken to police officers in Tuatapere and they had expressed concern about the feelings in the community if Diack were to be granted a firearms licence.

Lamb said the major reason police had refused Diack’s application for a firearms application was due to the 1996 shooting.

He didn’t accept the incidents in 2013 and 2014 were minor.

“Incidents involving violence aren’t minor.”

A long-time mate of Diack’s, John Munro, said he did not get the feeling the Tuatapere community was divided over the 1996 shooting.

Diack was a respected member of the community and it was not in his nature to be aggressive, Munro said.

Bear Attacks Hunter Near Hungry Horse Reservoir

Attack apparently a “surprise encounter” in a very brushy area between hunter and bear

https://flatheadbeacon.com/2017/09/25/bear-attacks-hunter-near-hungry-horse-reservoir/

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks reports that a bear attacked a hunter along the East side of the Hungry Horse Reservoir over the weekend.

FWP is investigating the Sept. 24 attack, which took place in the Twin Creek area near the reservoir. The hunter who was attacked – an adult male – was apparently involved in what FWP is initially calling a “surprise encounter” in a very bushy area.

The man was injured, and drove back with his hunting partner to a hospital for medical attention. The two did shoot at the bear during the encounter, and the bear ran off.

The Region One FWP Wildlife Human Attack Response Team was dispatched to the area immediately upon notification. Details about the attack, including the type of bear involved and the injuries the victim incurred, were not yet available.

Hunter Killed In Accidental Shooting Identified As Alabama Man

http://www.northescambia.com/2018/01/23hunter-dies-in-accidental-shooting

January 24, 2018

A hunter died in an apparent accident in Escambia County (AL) Tuesday morning.

Darren Smith, age 45 of Daphne. was discovered deceased at a hunting club from an obvious gunshot wound in the Huxford community, near  Prestwood Bridge Road, according to Escambia County (AL) Chief Deputy Mike Lambert.

Lambert said authorities believe Smith was accidentally shot by another hunter. Foul play is not suspected.

An investigation is underway by the Escambia County Alabama Sheriff’s Office and Alabama Game & Fish.

Dead goose falls from sky, knocks hunter unconscious

https://kdminer.com/news/2018/feb/13/dead-goose-falls-sky-knocks-hunter-unconscious/

Maryland (AP) – A waterfowl hunter is in stable condition after a dead goose fell from the sky and knocked him unconscious.

Robert Meilhammer of Dorchester County was hunting with three other people when one of them fired at a flock of Canada geese overhead in Easton, near the Miles River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Maryland Natural Resources Police spokeswoman Candy Thomson said a falling goose hit Meilhammer, knocking him out and causing head and facial injuries.

The Washington Post reports that when he came to, he knew who he was, but “little else,” [not unusual for a hunter].

Pastor shot, killed while hunting in Taylorsville

Shooter says he thought victim was coyote

  • By Shawn Taylor staylor@statesville.com

A 26-year-old Taylorsville man died Monday night after he was shot by another man while hunting.

Hunting accident injures man in Yellow Medicine County

http://www.marshallindependent.com/news/news-of-record/2018/04/hunting-accident-injures-man-in-yellow-medicine-county/

YELLOW MEDICINE COUNTY — An 18-year-old man was shot in the ankle in a hunting accident earlier this week, the Redwood County Sheriff’s Office said. The man received non life-threatening injuries, the Sheriff’s Office said.

The Redwood County Sheriff’s Office assisted the Yellow Medicine County Sheriff’s Office with the accident, which was reported at 10:27 p.m. Monday, at the intersection of 208th Avenue and 630th Street in rural Yellow Medicine County. An 18-year-old man was taken to the Granite Falls hospital and interviewed there, the Sheriff’s Office said.

According to the Sheriff’s Office, the man reported he was shot in the right ankle by his friend, who was shooting at a raccoon using a Remington .22 caliber rifle. The victim was transported by ambulance to North Memorial Hospital for surgery.

A news release from the Sheriff’s Office also included some advice from the shooting victim. When asked if he had any additional statements, the victim said, “Remember to use the safety.”

–Deb Gau

Hunter missing in wildfire found, hospitalized

MGN Online

AA

A missing Oklahoma hunter caught in a wildfire has been found, according to authorities.

Dewey County Sheriff reported on Facebook Friday that a missing hunter had been found in the Rhea fire near Vici. That hunter was reportedly transported to a nearby hospital “to seek medical care.” It’s unclear how serious the hunter’s injuries are.

At last check, the Oklahoma Forestry Services reported the Rhea fire has burned more than 82,000 acres in Dewey County. The fire was 0% contained.

Missing hunter’s body is found in Pecos River

A body found Saturday in the Pecos River is that of an Albuquerque man who went missing while hunting in November, his family confirmed Monday.

The body of Stanley Vigil, 54, was found about 2 p.m. by an off-duty state police officer who was fishing near the village of San Jose in San Miguel County, state police spokeswoman Lt. Elizabeth Armijo said.

Armijo said investigators transported the body to Albuquerque for an autopsy.

Darcy Vigil said police contacted her Monday afternoon and confirmed the body was that of her missing brother. She said police told her he had drowned and showed signs of head trauma and broken ribs.

She said authorities did not tell her how long he had been dead or in the river.

Stanley Vigil was last seen on Nov. 7 near Barillas Peak, east of Pecos, during a hunting trip with his family.

Darcy Vigil, 37, said Stanley Vigil had been with their father and other family members driving through the mountains when Stanley spotted a deer. He jumped out of the truck and began tracking the animal, which she said was not unusual for their hunting party.

The group waited but within five minutes snow and fog spread through the area, diminishing their field of view to about 10 yards, Darcy Vigil said. After 15 minutes, she said the alarmed hunting party started calling her brother’s name, honking and firing shots in the air. They heard a shot fired back but farther away.

Stanley Vigil never returned.

Members of the hunting party called for search and rescue and the help of the state police, but Vigil could not be located.

State police said Monday afternoon they are still investigating whether foul play was involved and could not provide more information.

According to a television news report in February, Vigil’s family had continued its quest to find him even after state police ended their search. A GoFundMe page was set up to raise money to help finance the independent search. Darcy Vigil said searchers used drones to help cover the area to no avail.

How Many People are Killed or Injured in Hunting Accidents?

https://www.thoughtco.com/hunting-accident-rates-127877
Male hunter aiming at deer with rifle

[Klaus Vedfelt]/[Taxi]/Getty Images

According to the International Hunter Education Association, in an average year, fewer that 1,000 people in the US and Canada are accidentally shot by hunters, and of these, fewer than 75 are fatalities. In many cases, these fatalities are self-inflicted by hunters who trip, fall, or have other accidents that cause them to shoot themselves with their own weapons. Most of the other fatalities come in hunting parties, where one hunter shoots another accidentally.

Firearm Fatalities in Hunting

Fatality numbers have improved somewhat in recent years, thanks to extensive hunter education programs available in most states, but hunting does come with inherent dangers. Hunting fatalities due to firearms account for about 12 to 15 percent of all fatalities due to firearms nationally. Hunting proponents will point out that the chances of a death due to a firearm accident of any kind are roughly the same as a death from falling out of a bed, chair, or other piece of furniture—about 1 in 4888. If you compare pure numbers, roughly 20 times as many people die each year by accidental drowning than do by accidents while hunting. These statistics are slightly misleading, however, since far more people engage in recreational swimming than engage in sports hunting with firearms.

Overall accidental death statistics from the National Safety Council can provide some context.

Of all accidental deaths:

  • 1 out of every 114 is a motor vehicle crash
  • 1 out of every 370 is an intentional assault by a firearm
  • 1 out of 1,188 is due to accidental drowning
  • 1 out of every  6,905 is an accidental firearms discharge
  • 1 out of every 161,856 is due to a lightning strike

It must be noted, however, that a great many accidental deaths by firearms do not involve hunters.

When shooting-related fatalities occur in hunting, most of the victims are hunters, although non-hunters are also sometimes killed or injured. It can be said that this is a sport that does pose some danger to an entire community, not just to the willing participants.

Hunting Related Accidents in Context

In reality, most the greatest dangers to hunters are not related to firearms, but occur for other reasons, such as car accidents traveling to and from hunting sites or heart attacks while hiking woods and hills. Particularly dangerous are fall from tree stands. Recent estimates say that there are almost 6,000 hunting accidents to hunters each year involving falls tree stands—six times as many as are wounded by firearms. A recent survey in the state of Indiana found that 55% of all hunting-related accidents in that state were related to tree stands.

The vast majority of fatal accidental shootings while hunting involve the use of shotguns or rifles while hunting deer. This perhaps no surprise, since deer hunting is one of the most popular forms of hunting where high-powered firearms are used.

The Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting maintains the Hunting Accidents Centersite, which collects news stories about hunting accidents throughout the United States.

Although the list is long, it’s not comprehensive, and not every hunting accident is reported in the news. If you’ve seen a newspaper article about a hunting accident that is not included in the site, you can submit a report.