Hunter Killed In Accidental Shooting Identified As Alabama Man

http://www.northescambia.com/2018/01/23hunter-dies-in-accidental-shooting

January 24, 2018

A hunter died in an apparent accident in Escambia County (AL) Tuesday morning.

Darren Smith, age 45 of Daphne. was discovered deceased at a hunting club from an obvious gunshot wound in the Huxford community, near  Prestwood Bridge Road, according to Escambia County (AL) Chief Deputy Mike Lambert.

Lambert said authorities believe Smith was accidentally shot by another hunter. Foul play is not suspected.

An investigation is underway by the Escambia County Alabama Sheriff’s Office and Alabama Game & Fish.

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Dead goose falls from sky, knocks hunter unconscious

https://kdminer.com/news/2018/feb/13/dead-goose-falls-sky-knocks-hunter-unconscious/

Maryland (AP) – A waterfowl hunter is in stable condition after a dead goose fell from the sky and knocked him unconscious.

Robert Meilhammer of Dorchester County was hunting with three other people when one of them fired at a flock of Canada geese overhead in Easton, near the Miles River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Maryland Natural Resources Police spokeswoman Candy Thomson said a falling goose hit Meilhammer, knocking him out and causing head and facial injuries.

The Washington Post reports that when he came to, he knew who he was, but “little else,” [not unusual for a hunter].

Pastor shot, killed while hunting in Taylorsville

Shooter says he thought victim was coyote

  • By Shawn Taylor staylor@statesville.com

A 26-year-old Taylorsville man died Monday night after he was shot by another man while hunting.

Hunting accident injures man in Yellow Medicine County

http://www.marshallindependent.com/news/news-of-record/2018/04/hunting-accident-injures-man-in-yellow-medicine-county/

YELLOW MEDICINE COUNTY — An 18-year-old man was shot in the ankle in a hunting accident earlier this week, the Redwood County Sheriff’s Office said. The man received non life-threatening injuries, the Sheriff’s Office said.

The Redwood County Sheriff’s Office assisted the Yellow Medicine County Sheriff’s Office with the accident, which was reported at 10:27 p.m. Monday, at the intersection of 208th Avenue and 630th Street in rural Yellow Medicine County. An 18-year-old man was taken to the Granite Falls hospital and interviewed there, the Sheriff’s Office said.

According to the Sheriff’s Office, the man reported he was shot in the right ankle by his friend, who was shooting at a raccoon using a Remington .22 caliber rifle. The victim was transported by ambulance to North Memorial Hospital for surgery.

A news release from the Sheriff’s Office also included some advice from the shooting victim. When asked if he had any additional statements, the victim said, “Remember to use the safety.”

–Deb Gau

Hunter missing in wildfire found, hospitalized

MGN Online

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A missing Oklahoma hunter caught in a wildfire has been found, according to authorities.

Dewey County Sheriff reported on Facebook Friday that a missing hunter had been found in the Rhea fire near Vici. That hunter was reportedly transported to a nearby hospital “to seek medical care.” It’s unclear how serious the hunter’s injuries are.

At last check, the Oklahoma Forestry Services reported the Rhea fire has burned more than 82,000 acres in Dewey County. The fire was 0% contained.

Missing hunter’s body is found in Pecos River

A body found Saturday in the Pecos River is that of an Albuquerque man who went missing while hunting in November, his family confirmed Monday.

The body of Stanley Vigil, 54, was found about 2 p.m. by an off-duty state police officer who was fishing near the village of San Jose in San Miguel County, state police spokeswoman Lt. Elizabeth Armijo said.

Armijo said investigators transported the body to Albuquerque for an autopsy.

Darcy Vigil said police contacted her Monday afternoon and confirmed the body was that of her missing brother. She said police told her he had drowned and showed signs of head trauma and broken ribs.

She said authorities did not tell her how long he had been dead or in the river.

Stanley Vigil was last seen on Nov. 7 near Barillas Peak, east of Pecos, during a hunting trip with his family.

Darcy Vigil, 37, said Stanley Vigil had been with their father and other family members driving through the mountains when Stanley spotted a deer. He jumped out of the truck and began tracking the animal, which she said was not unusual for their hunting party.

The group waited but within five minutes snow and fog spread through the area, diminishing their field of view to about 10 yards, Darcy Vigil said. After 15 minutes, she said the alarmed hunting party started calling her brother’s name, honking and firing shots in the air. They heard a shot fired back but farther away.

Stanley Vigil never returned.

Members of the hunting party called for search and rescue and the help of the state police, but Vigil could not be located.

State police said Monday afternoon they are still investigating whether foul play was involved and could not provide more information.

According to a television news report in February, Vigil’s family had continued its quest to find him even after state police ended their search. A GoFundMe page was set up to raise money to help finance the independent search. Darcy Vigil said searchers used drones to help cover the area to no avail.

How Many People are Killed or Injured in Hunting Accidents?

https://www.thoughtco.com/hunting-accident-rates-127877
Male hunter aiming at deer with rifle

[Klaus Vedfelt]/[Taxi]/Getty Images

According to the International Hunter Education Association, in an average year, fewer that 1,000 people in the US and Canada are accidentally shot by hunters, and of these, fewer than 75 are fatalities. In many cases, these fatalities are self-inflicted by hunters who trip, fall, or have other accidents that cause them to shoot themselves with their own weapons. Most of the other fatalities come in hunting parties, where one hunter shoots another accidentally.

Firearm Fatalities in Hunting

Fatality numbers have improved somewhat in recent years, thanks to extensive hunter education programs available in most states, but hunting does come with inherent dangers. Hunting fatalities due to firearms account for about 12 to 15 percent of all fatalities due to firearms nationally. Hunting proponents will point out that the chances of a death due to a firearm accident of any kind are roughly the same as a death from falling out of a bed, chair, or other piece of furniture—about 1 in 4888. If you compare pure numbers, roughly 20 times as many people die each year by accidental drowning than do by accidents while hunting. These statistics are slightly misleading, however, since far more people engage in recreational swimming than engage in sports hunting with firearms.

Overall accidental death statistics from the National Safety Council can provide some context.

Of all accidental deaths:

  • 1 out of every 114 is a motor vehicle crash
  • 1 out of every 370 is an intentional assault by a firearm
  • 1 out of 1,188 is due to accidental drowning
  • 1 out of every  6,905 is an accidental firearms discharge
  • 1 out of every 161,856 is due to a lightning strike

It must be noted, however, that a great many accidental deaths by firearms do not involve hunters.

When shooting-related fatalities occur in hunting, most of the victims are hunters, although non-hunters are also sometimes killed or injured. It can be said that this is a sport that does pose some danger to an entire community, not just to the willing participants.

Hunting Related Accidents in Context

In reality, most the greatest dangers to hunters are not related to firearms, but occur for other reasons, such as car accidents traveling to and from hunting sites or heart attacks while hiking woods and hills. Particularly dangerous are fall from tree stands. Recent estimates say that there are almost 6,000 hunting accidents to hunters each year involving falls tree stands—six times as many as are wounded by firearms. A recent survey in the state of Indiana found that 55% of all hunting-related accidents in that state were related to tree stands.

The vast majority of fatal accidental shootings while hunting involve the use of shotguns or rifles while hunting deer. This perhaps no surprise, since deer hunting is one of the most popular forms of hunting where high-powered firearms are used.

The Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting maintains the Hunting Accidents Centersite, which collects news stories about hunting accidents throughout the United States.

Although the list is long, it’s not comprehensive, and not every hunting accident is reported in the news. If you’ve seen a newspaper article about a hunting accident that is not included in the site, you can submit a report.

Juvenile male shot in hunting accident

https://www.mitchellrepublic.com/news/accidents/4428006-juvenile-male-shot-hunting-accident

A juvenile male sustained non-life threatening injuries last week after being shot in what authorities are calling a hunting accident.

At about 8 a.m. on March 30, the juvenile from Illinois was snow goose hunting in a layout blind in southern Davison County, according to Conservation Officer Brian Humphrey, of the South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks Department.

Reports say the gun’s safety appeared to be off, the gun was bumped and a round was fired into the juvenile’s lower body. He was treated at a Parkston hospital. No information was currently available on his condition. There are no criminal charges pending.

The incident is still being investigated, Humphrey said. Authorities are not releasing the person’s name because he is a juvenile.

Kaimai Range hunter shot dead during beginning of roar at Easter weekend

A paramedic was winched into the bush south of Te Aroha to try to help save the shot hunter. Photo / File
A paramedic was winched into the bush south of Te Aroha to try to help save the shot hunter. Photo / File

A hunter has died after being shot in the chest in the Kaimai Range.

Waikato Senior Sergeant Mike Henwood said police received a call about a hunter being shot about 10.15am. Henwood said the area was very remote and had no communication. The hunter was shot in forest near Wairakau Rd, about 15km south of Te Aroha.

It comes during the beginning of the roar, a favoured hunting period, for many parts of the country.

The roar is when stags are most vocal, calling to attract the attention of females and are less cautious than other times.

The roar lasts about four weeks, and stags are the most vocal in the middle two weeks.

Red deer roar from late March through April.

A fellow hunter called emergency services about 10.15am.

The Auckland Westpac Rescue Helicopter was sent to the remote spot and a paramedic winched down to work on the man, who was about a two-hour hike from the carpark.

Police would conduct inquiries on behalf of the coroner.

New Zealand Deerstalkers’ Association national president Bill O’Leary said the reality was a fatal hunting incident such as this happened once or twice a year.

Pensacola man shot twice by hunting buddy (and they’re planning another trip soon)

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On the opening day of turkey season earlier this month, longtime hunting buddies Hilton Hutto and Fred Wilson were staked out in blinds on Wilson’s property in Ponce de Leon.

The 80-acre lot is surrounded by a timber mill, with planted pines lining the property line. The area is isolated, making it a prime spot for hunting.

The two men were about 75 yards apart, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission report that would follow, when Hutto saw a turkey walk in front of his friend.

Wilson recalls seeing Hutto line up the shot with his barrel facing directly at the turkey —and in turn, at him. He thought his friend was just getting his target ready so he could get the bird when it took a few steps away from Wilson.

Archive: Everything you need to know for duck hunting in the Pensacola area

He was wrong. Hutto shot twice.

“I guess he got all excited and didn’t realize he was shooting at me, too,” said Wilson, 65.

More than 20 pellets from the two shotgun shells drove into Wilson’s face, torso, arms and hands.

“The turkey got in the way, I didn’t think it was between us and I guess it was, and I shot, then he came out of his blind and said, ‘Hey, you shot me,'” said Hutto, 86.

Wilson said he and Hutto immediately packed up and drove the roughly 80 minutes from Ponce de Leon to Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola, where both men live. Wilson said he could have gone to a hospital in Crestview but wanted to be treated at home.

There was blood running down Wilson’s face and pellets lodged in his hands, but Wilson said he gripped the wheel and sped down Interstate 10.

“The adrenaline was there, I knew I was shot and there was blood all down my face but the adrenaline was just going,” Wilson said, adding that he didn’t yet feel the pain of the shooting.

Hutto said he felt terrible about the accident, and sat in the passenger seat with Wilson as the two sped toward the hospital.

More: Deers, duck and doves all on menu as hunting season starts in Florida

“I felt real bad about it, I’d just shot a good friend of mine, someone I’d been hunting with for years. It’s a no good feeling,” he said.

The incident happened March 17, and as of Thursday, Wilson was still meeting with doctors and scheduling surgeries to remove the pellets. Some can never be removed, he said.

“A couple of them they found had gone in and right out, and I’ve got two in my face that are going to be removed, the one in my right hand and index finger,” Wilson said. He said the pellets that need to stay are around his lungs.

FWC is still actively investigating the shooting, according to spokeswoman Rebekah Nelson. She said no further information about the incident could be released, but, she said, there were no turkey hunting accidents reported last season.

Wilson said there’s no animosity between him and Hutto, but he is now dealing with flashbacks of seeing the shells explode toward him.

“The only bad thing is I have nightmares about it, and sometimes I’ll be sitting down and I’ll see it all over again,” Wilson said. “The first time he shot I was looking right at him.”

The pair has plans to hunt together again soon, although Wilson laughs, saying he won’t be setting up anywhere close to Hutto. He’s in good spirits, despite the multiple surgeries and time consulting doctors, chalking it up to a mistake between friends.

“He didn’t kill me and he didn’t blind me, the big guy was watching out for me,” Wilson said.