Rescued jumbo dies of injuries caused by snare trap


KOTA KINABALU: A juvenile male Bornean pygmy elephant has died a week after he was found with an injury on his front left leg caused by a snare trap at Ulu Segama Forest Reserve, Lahad Datu.

Sabah Wildlife Department (SWD) public relations officer Siti Nur’Ain Ampuan Acheh said the five-year-old pachyderm died on the way to the Borneo Elephant Sanctuary in Kinabatangan at about 8.40am on Sunday (Sept 2).

Siti Nur’Ain said the elephant was rescued on Aug 26 after it was found with an injury on its leg caused by the trapping device.

She added that a team comprising a veterinarian and wildlife rangers was dispatched to the location to rescue the injured animal.

image: https://www.thestar.com.my/~/media/online/2018/09/02/13/43/pygmydead2.ashx?la=en

One of the last pictures taken of the weakened elephant before it succumbed to its injuries.

“They managed to capture the elephant and initiated treatment. He suffered a severe and deep wound which had already reached the bone.

“The elephant was also in poor physical condition and weak,” she said.

Siti Nur’Ain said the animal did not respond well to the treatment and died while being transported to the sanctuary for further treatment.

“Post-mortem was conducted to determine the cause of death.

“Findings revealed that the elephant died due to septicaemia which originated from the severe snare trap injury,” she explained.

SWD is investigating the manager of the adjoining plantation.

The latest death brings to 26 the number of elephants killed this year.

Read more at https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2018/09/02/rescued-jumbo-dies-of-injuries-caused-by-snare-trap/#SpKg03ghkPIccXti.99

Man pleads “not guilty” in unlawful trapping case

    http://www.moabsunnews.com/news/article_106ddd58-390b-11e8-b82c-73c40bd9e593.html

    Wildlife officials allege that suspect involved in new violation

    Posted: Thursday, April 5, 2018 1:53 pm | Updated: 1:57 pm, Thu Apr 5, 2018.

    The alleged owner of the trap that killed a local teenager’s dog near Hunter Canyon this past February has been charged in connection with the incident, and is scheduled to appear at a bench trial on Tuesday, April 11.

    Timothy Shawn Gardner of Moab has pleaded “not guilty” to six misdemeanor charges of “unlawful methods of trapping.” He could not be reached for comment.

    Moab high school student Ali Hirt was hiking with her two dogs and some friends on Feb. 10 when her Australian shepherd/pit bull mix, Stoic, was caught in the trap in Kane Creek and died within minutes. The incident was reported in the Feb. 22-28, 2018, edition of the Moab Sun News.

    Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR) officials set up surveillance cameras in the area and allegedly identified the owner of the trap as Gardner.

    Gardner has a license to trap, and was allegedly operating during open trapping season in an area where trapping is legal. But DWR officials said the trap in question was not labeled with the required registration number and was not modified to protect non-targeted wildlife in accordance with state regulations.

    “Each trapping device must have a permanent and legible trap registration number,” Utah DWR Lt. Ben Wolford said. “This is the same number found on a trap registration license. A person is only assigned one number, and it must be on the device. None of the traps had this number attached.”

    The state requires that traps of the type Gardner allegedly used, set within 100 yards of tributaries to the Colorado River in the Moab area, must be modified to protect river otters. The modification involves relocating a trigger mechanism so that otters, which have a slimmer profile than beavers, can navigate the trap without activating the trigger. Otters are listed as a sensitive species in Utah, and efforts have been made over several decades to increase their population distribution in the state and to protect them from accidental trapping, aside from “nuisance” individuals.

    However, the modification to protect otters would not necessarily have saved Stoic, Wolford said.

    “We don’t know where the dog actually was hit with that trigger mechanism,” he said. “He may or may not have hit it, if it was modified.”

    If Gardner is convicted, he will likely face fines. Wolford said the amount could be anywhere from $100 to thousands of dollars, depending on what the prosecuting and defending attorneys agree upon.

    Since the incident near Hunter Canyon, Gardner has allegedly been found to be involved in another trapping violation, in another location.

    A local property owner, whose name is not being publicly released, found an unauthorized box trap on his land and contacted DWR officials. This trap is a style used for live capture of a variety of animals, including bobcats, skunks and raccoons.

    Gardner allegedly approached the scene while a DWR officer was investigating.

    “He (Gardner) came up the road,” Wolford said, “And my officer made contact with him and found out it was his trap.”

    This incident is still under separate investigation, and so far, no official charges have been filed. Wolford expects that charges will be filed shortly, and may include trespassing and failure to properly label the trap with the license registration number.

    Hirt said she is disappointed to hear that Gardner will plead “not guilty” to the misdemeanor offenses stemming from the Feb. 10 incident.

    “Those were definitely his traps, and he definitely knew what he was doing when he put them so close to the trail,” she said. “I’d have a lot more respect for him if he’d pleaded guilty and owned up for the terrible thing that he did.”

    Even if Gardner’s traps had been set according to current regulations, loose dogs in popular hiking areas could still be at risk from wildlife traps. Hirt acknowledged this.

    “(It’s) something that I feel like should be addressed,” she said. “I think that they should have a restriction on how close you can set those traps in popular areas, especially right near a trailhead like that.”

    Hirt, whose grandfather is a trapper, has initiated discussions of the issue on Facebook.

    “I would like to see something done,” she said. “It could have been so avoidable, which is terrible.”

    When Stoic was killed, he left behind his brother, Neko.

    “He was really sad and lonely in the house,” Hirt said of the surviving dog. “So we went and got a rescue pup. His name is Pumbaa, and he’s been really good. They get along really well.”

    Hirt said she is glad that Neko has a companion again, though the family is still sad about the loss of their dog.

    Wolford has said that the DWR encourages trappers to avoid areas popular with other recreationists, but there is no enforcement. Trappers are free to operate on public lands.

    Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Public Affairs Specialist Lisa Bryant has said that the agency tries to inform the public about wildlife traps, and encourages dog owners to leash their pets. But BLM officials cannot realistically place signs in every area where traps may be set, and there are no existing restrictions on trap placement in high-use areas.

    Moab resident Frank Darcey is an organizer for the currently dormant Moab Sportsman’s Club. The club is not specifically associated with trapping, but Darcey is familiar with trapping techniques and some local trappers.

    Darcey referred to the death of Hirt’s dog as “a terribly unfortunate accident.” However, he also feels that owners should leash their dogs in areas where there is a risk of traps.

    “Nobody in the Sportsman’s Club wants to see anybody’s pet harmed, or in this case, killed,” Darcey said. “It’s also incumbent upon the pet owners to control their pets.”

    “All trappers should be aware of the regulations,” Darcey added. “If you’re going to be trapping, you need to abide by all of the rules and regulations.”

    $1,000 reward offered for conviction of snaring culprit

    Vancouver non-profit responding to a spate of deaths involving grizzly bears, wolves and moose

    Conservation Officer Service photo One of several snares discovered in the Kitimat River Valley. Conservation Officer Service photo

    A Vancouver-based non-profit is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of those responsible for a series of illegal snaring incidents in the Kitimat River Valley.

    The Association for the Protection of Fur-Bearing Animals made the offer public Thursday (Feb. 8) afternoon. “These disturbing incidents need to be condemned by all, and our hope is that this reward will help bring more attention to the case,” said spokesperson Adrian Nelson. “Anyone who has information is asked to contact the Conservation Officer Service so that the individual or individuals responsible can be stopped and face the consequences for their actions.”

    Earlier this week the Terrace office of the Conservation Officer Service appealed for public assistance in their investigation, noting charges may be applicable under the Provincial Wildlife Act as well as the Canada Criminal Code for cruelty to animals and mischief.

    Evidence was found throughout the valley where heavy-gauge wire had been used in attempts to capture large animals.

    “So far we have located dead grizzly bears, wolves, and coyotes with evidence that moose are being caught as well. It’s beyond my comprehension why someone would think it is acceptable to indiscriminately snare our wildlife in such a callous calculated manner,” Sgt. Tracy Walbauer had said.

    READ MORE: Public’s help sought in cruel and prolific animal snaring activity

    “That the person responsible for this has no regard for wildlife and the snares are poorly designed and illegal — those animals observed in the snares endured a great deal of suffering before death.”

    The locations identified so far have been semi-remote but Walbauer was concerned there may be traps closer to human habitation.

    In a telephone interview with The Fur-Bearers, Nelson said it’s been about two years since the association has offered a reward in this manner, but the seriousness of these incidents justified the action.

    “It’s the waste of wildlife in this case,” he said. “It’s one thing if someone is out subsistence hunting, but in this case it just seems flagrant that someone is putting traps in the bush and not coming back to check them.

    “And it’s the range of animals that’s really scary. To be honest it’s one of the worst [cases] that we’ve seen.”

    Nelson added The Fur-Bearers have a good-standing relationship with the Terrace COS and is optimistic the reward will prompt public tips to assist in their investigation.

    “We don’t see a lot of this stuff, on this scale, in that area,” Nelson said. “For it to show up like this is kind of odd…people live there and move out there for that connection to the wildlife, so this wasting of wildlife I think will irk a lot of people.”

    Anyone with information on the snaring activity in Kitimat River Valley is asked to contact the Conservation Officer Service at 1-877-952-7277.

    READ MORE: Moose collisions prompt warning from Conservation

    The Association for the Protection of Fur-Bearing Animals was founded in 1953, according to its website, with a mission to end the commercial fur trade and promote co-existence between humans and wildlife.

    https://www.terracestandard.com/local-news/1000-reward-offered-for-conviction-of-snaring-culprit/

    Fossey Fund trackers save young gorilla from snare

    https://gorillafund.org/fossey-fund-trackers-save-young-gorilla-snare/?utm_source=Gorilla+List&utm_campaign=55d6ab2251-FashaUpdate_2017_04_10&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_335decb1af-55d6ab2251-72515689&mc_cid=55d6ab2251&mc_eid=40a04b9ac4

    It’s been a very stressful time for one of the mountain gorilla groups we monitor every day in Rwanda’s Volcanoes mountains. Isabukuru’s group faced the death of its leader late last month, and yesterday our trackers found one of the youngsters from this group caught in a snare.

    Although no gorillas in the groups we protect had been caught in snares since November 2015, Fossey Fund staff have concerned about recent increases in the numbers of snares seen, many of which have been close to the gorilla groups. When our trackers arrived in Isabukuru’s group yesterday and noticed immediately that 3-year-old Fasha was not in the group, they began a search for him and found a deactivated snare nearby.

    Soon they located Fasha by himself, with a long piece of rope around his ankle, attached to a bamboo branch. They were able to detach the branch, but the rope was wound tightly around his foot. This meant that a veterinary intervention would be necessary to have the rope removed, which requires sedation, and plans were made for this to happen today. Our trackers then waited in the forest for the rest of the day, until Fasha was able to move back to his group, since he was extremely stressed out and initially seemed to be going in the wrong direction.

    Fasha with the rope from the snare on his left foot
    Fasha with the rope from the snare on his left ankle

    https://player.vimeo.com/video/212283403?color=ffffff&title=0&byline=0&portrait=0
    Successful intervention

    Today the intervention was conducted with Gorilla Doctors veterinarians, and included nine staff from the Fossey Fund, as well as Rwanda park authorities (RDB). Initially, Fasha was located close to silverback Kubaha, who has taken over the group since former leader Isabukuru died on March 26. Fasha was one of three youngsters who were receiving special protection from Isabukuru, since they all had mothers who had transferred out of the group. Luckily, Kubaha has so far taken over this protective role.

    As our trackers arrived in the group, they found Fasha and others still in their night nests. When Fasha fell asleep after being sedated with a dart, our trackers were able to chase the other gorillas and keep them away during the intervention. The rope had become very tight on Fasha’s now-swollen left ankle, showing that he or other gorillas had tried to remove it, and he’d also lost a few teeth, probably while trying to bite the snare off. But the rope was successfully removed, the wound cleaned and antibiotics given, all within about 30 minutes. After resting for a short while, Fasha started moving with the group and all were feeding calmly.

    Trackers play critical role

    The Fossey Fund’s gorilla trackers and researchers play a critical role in this kind of situation, since it is our daily following of every gorilla in each group we protect that allows us to notice when something is wrong and to make experienced decisions in handling the situation. If our trackers had not noticed Fasha was missing, had not been able to locate him, and had not made sure he returned to his group, it is likely the outcome would have much more serious.

    Thanks to support from all of our donors, we are able to provide this kind of daily, intensive protection for all of the gorillas we monitor. Help us continue this work by donating here.

    LOHV URGES STRONG OPPOSITION TO USE OF SNARES IN TRAPPING

    Alaskan-Wolf-Snare_med

    1.        Bill S548   Senator Skelos  518 455-2800 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 518 455-2800 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting – Ask him to Defeat
    2.       Senator Klein    518 455-2800 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 518 455-2800 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting Ask him to Defeat  
    b.   Speaker Sheldon Silver   518.455.3791 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 518.455.3791 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting Speaker@assembly.state.ny.us   Ask him to please  DEFEAT this bill A9137.
    c.    Assembly Member Robert Sweeney   Chair of the Environmental Conservation Committee Assembly Member Robert Sweeney  518.455.5787 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 518.455.5787 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting Sweeney@assembly.state.ny.us Ask him to DEFEAT  bill  A9137.
     
     
     
    Memorandum of Opposition to: A9137
    Dear Assembly member…..
    Bill A9137 allows the use of snares in trapping. An animal caught in such a device would struggle to escape by instinctively lunging forward, thus tightening the snare and causing its suffocation or loss of consciousness.  If the animal recovers from a loss of consciousness, it would repeat the process again and again. If used underwater to trap beavers it would bring about a slow agonizing death by drowning.
    Either conscious or unconscious, the animal would be unable to fight-off or escape  predators.
    It is an extremely cruel way to remove animals from an area. The device is not selective as to species, and many unintended species- including threatened species — as well as domestic animals, are subject to torturous destruction by those devices.
    Hunters frequently use snares of this type of live-capture snares to train their dogs on live animals:
     
    A “cable restraint” is put to use to train these dogs. Often fox are used to train the young dogs, who then graduate to coyotes.
    Coyote hunters use snared coyotes to train their hunting dogs while they are caught in the snare and struggling. The more the coyote struggles, the tighter the snare gets
    We believe we speak on behalf of New Yorkers who feel strongly about the humane treatment of all animals and oppose the legalization of these instruments of wildlife torture.
    WE URGE YOUR STRONG OPPOSITION TO THIS HORRIFIC BILL.