Tess killed this giraffe for fun. 

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Tess killed this giraffe for fun. She smiles in front of his dead body and calls it a “dream hunt”! But we NOW have an unprecedented chance to help stop more vulnerable giraffes from being killed — starting by winning them international protection at a crucial wildlife summit in weeks! Sign now and share this with absolutely everyone to get our leaders’ attention!

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Dear friends,

Tess killed this giraffe for fun.

She smiles in front of his dead body and calls it a “dream hunt”! It’s simply unexplainable why someone would be allowed do this. But we NOW have an unprecedented chance to help stop more vulnerable giraffes from being killed.

In weeks, countries from across the world are meeting for a crucial global wildlife summit. And for the first time ever, five African countries have proposed to put giraffes onto the list of protected species. This would be a game-changer and wake the world up to give giraffes the protection they deserve. And it’s urgently needed because the giraffe population is already down by 40%.

No one should murder animals just for fun, but we have a plan that could finally get giraffes the safety they need. Let’s all sign on now and then let’s make sure we share this with everyone we know!

Click here and let’s get giraffes the protection they deserve!

Here’s how Tess explains the rightness of her action: “Animals have no rights as they are animals not humans. Therefore you can’t murder them.”

She says that, likely knowing that giraffes are highly intelligent, emotional animals — who spend their evenings humming to each other to communicate. It’s time for all of humanity to see our animal friends as possessing rights, and being treated with dignity.

So if you disagree that they should be shot for fun, and believe that they should actually be protected from irresponsible game hunts, poaching, and habitat loss — then join us and let’s win them protection at this year’s CITES summit in May, the most important global conference on this issue. This will act as the first step in our Africa-wide giraffe protection plan!

So far, giraffes have gotten little attention, but with their population continuously dropping — it’s high time we ring the alarm bells, make this petition go viral, and have our governments act on our behalf!

Click here and let’s get giraffes the protection they deserve!

Life on Earth is so precious. And yet, some still think it’s all just a game and it’s the right thing to go and shoot animals for fun. The Avaaz community has stood up together when Cecil the Lion was killed or when Donald Trump tried to re-open the import of animal trophies — let’s do it once again for the giraffes!

With hope and determination,

Christoph, Sarah, Martyna, Risalat, Joseph, Rosa, Jenny and the rest of the Avaaz team

MORE INFORMATION:

Fury over woman’s ‘sick’ giraffe hunting pictures (News AU)
https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/animals/fury-over-womans-sick-giraffe-hunting-pictures/ne…

Giraffes under Threat: Populations Down 40 Percent in Just 15 Years (Scientific American)
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/extinction-countdown/giraffes-under-threat-populations-down-40-…

…giraffes HUM: Graceful giant of the African grasslands spend evenings humming to each other (DailyMail)
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3249335/Giraffes-HUM-night.html

Big game hunter who held a bloodied sex toy next to a sheep she killed faces criminal charges

Police in Scotland have confirmed that Larysa Switlyk has been reported for firearms offences along with a 41-year-old man who is also from the United States

Big game hunter who held a bloodied sex toy next to a sheep she killed faces criminal charges

A 33-year-old big-game hunter from Sarasota, Florida, Larysa Switlyk, who boasted of shooting and killing local animals while visiting a Scottish island is now reportedly facing criminal charges. Switlyk, “a world-renowned hunter”, was accused of “trophy hunting” wild animals on the island of Islay, Scotland in September after she posed with several of her kills and posted the pictures on Instagram.

Police in Scotland have now confirmed that the hunter has been reported for firearms offences, along with a 41-year-old man, who is also from the United States, according to the Daily Mail.

Although hunting animals in season is not illegal in Scotland, Switlyk is facing a charge under Section 11a of the Firearms Act, which is linked to how one can use borrowed shotguns legally.

Larysa Switlyk posing with her game (Instagram/laryasaunleashed)
Larysa Switlyk posing with her game (Instagram/laryasaunleashed)

Switlyk, in November, had stirred controversy after she posted a picture of herself in Norfolk, posing next to a sheep she had just killed and holding a blood-smeared sex toy. Scotland police said that they had received multiple complaints about hunting in September and the Procurator Fiscal is now probing the incidents, according to the Daily Mail.

Switlyk, a television presenter, in one of her Instagram pictures can be seen dressed in camouflage gear and kneeling beside the corpse of a goat, while another image shows her posing “in sniper mode” and lying in grass while pointing a gun into the distance.

Reports state that her games also include stags and she had captioned one of her pictures with: “In awe of my Scottish Stag — can’t wait to bring it back to the castle for the chefs to cook it up!”

Larysa Switlyk posing with her game (Instagram/laryasaunleashed)
Larysa Switlyk posing with her game (Instagram/laryasaunleashed)

The images she posted of the hunt sparked outrage in the country, with one Member of the Scottish Parliament warning that he would be looking into whether the hunts were organized by an official group or not. It is legal to hunt red stags between July 1 and October 20, given that the hunters use firearms and have a licence for their weapons and have the permission of the landowner.

A spokesperson for the Scottish government at the time had said: “We fully understand why so many people find these images of hunted animals being held up as trophies so upsetting. Responsible and appropriate culling of animals is a necessary part of sustainable land management and the culling of some wild animals, including deer and goats, is not illegal.”

Larysa Switlyk posing with her game (Instagram/laryasaunleashed)
Larysa Switlyk posing with her game (Instagram/laryasaunleashed)

“However, we understand the concerns caused by these images and, in light of them, the Environment Secretary will review the situation and consider whether any clarification of or changes to the law might be required,” the spokesperson added.

MALAWI REMAINS FREE FROM TROPHY HUNTING!

December 21, 2018

http://www.lilongwewildlife.org/> Lilongwe Wildlife Trust

Great news.the Government have confirmed that they have rejected the hunting
proposal!

Following debate on the introduction of trophy hunting inside Malawi’s
protected areas, we collected over 3,500
<http://www.lilongwewildlife.org/no-hunting-in-malawi/> petition signatures
in the first 48 hours – thank you so much to all who signed and shared it.
Read the statement
<http://www.lilongwewildlife.org/government-statement-on-trophy-hunting/>
here.

Special thanks go to the Malawi Parliamentary Conservation Caucus for their
strong stance. Hon Commodius Nyirenda, MP and MPCC Spokesperson, said,
“Public opinion reflects that of the Malawi Parliamentary Conservation
Caucus: that trophy hunting is not welcome in Malawi. We value our
reputation as a tourism destination too highly. And – where legal hunting
can be used as a cover for illegal wildlife trade and undermine community
sensitisation efforts – we believe that the questionable revenue is not
worth the associated risks that could ultimately undermine conservation
efforts.”

Thanks also to PASA, the Born Free Foundation, Olsen Animal Trust, Love
Support Unite and Green Paw for their extra support.

Merry Christmas everyone!

* <http://www.lilongwewildlife.org/trophy-hunting-resources

Famous Yellowstone park wolf shot dead by trophy hunter

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Hunting and killing wolves is legal in Montana

One of Yellowstone National Park’s most popular wolves has been shot dead by a trophy hunter.

Spitfire, also known as Wolf 926F, was killed legally a few miles outside a park entrance in Montana, according to animal rights group Wolves of the Rockies.

The organisation shared the news on its Facebook page on Wednesday.

Spitfire was previously the alpha female leader of the Lamar valley wolfpack.

Spitfire and her pack attracted animal lovers from all over the world (Leo Leckie)

Her mother was also killed by a hunter in 2012 and Spitfire was credited with keeping the pack together after her death.

Both animals were stars in an area described by Yellowstone officials as a “wolf-watching mecca”, which attracts animal lovers from all over the world.

The hunter who killed Spitfire was acting legally according to The Dodoas it is currently hunting season for wolves in MontanaIdaho and Wyoming, the states that Yellowstone covers.

Wolf hunting licences in Montana cost just $19 (£15) for residents and $50 (£39) for others, according to the Wolf Conservation Centre.

https://players.brightcove.net/624246174001/SydS6Pxaf_default/index.html?videoId=5837728067001&customParams=videoID%253D5837728067001%2526articleId%253D8660741%2526gs_channels%253Dshadow9hu7_safe_from_nestle_blacklist%2Csafe_from_essence_blacklist%2Csafe_from_harvey_weinstein%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_asda%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_halifax_misc_blacklist%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_workdayh2%2Csafe_aegis%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_aegis_blacklist%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_castrol%2Cbelvedere_negative%2Cgv_death_injury%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_emirates_crew_incident%2Csafe_from_emirates_blacklist%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_instagram-mobkoi%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_mobkoi-celine%2Cpos_animal_cruelty%2Cpos_castrol_blacklist%2Cpos_microsoft_blacklist_microsoft%2Cpos_microsoft_blacklist_wildfire%2Cpos_society_lgbt%2Cpos_terrorism_blacklist%2Cpos_ubs_tax_evasion%2Csafe_from_collective_landrover%2Csafe_from_facebook_blacklist%2Csafe_from_fas_blacklist%2Cgv_arms%2Cindy_south-west-gdo_aug16%2Cindy_dating-looking-for-love_nov16%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_emirates_pg%2Cnestle_bespoke%2Cshadow9hu7_safe_from_mobkoi_facebook_keyword%2526playertype%253Dclicktoplay%2526topictags%253Dyellowstonenational_park%2Cmontana%2Ctrophyhunting%2526permutive%253D3446%2C3448%2C3449%2C3507%2C7064%2C7065%2C3478%2C3487%2C3492%2C3499%2C3500%2C3527%2C3705%2C3737%2C3738%2C3748%2C3750%2C3751%2C3762%2C3763%2C3769%2C3783%2C3785%2C3795%2C3800%2C3812%2C3817%2C3821%2C3828%2C3845%2C3847%2C3850%2C3853%2C3881%2C3891%2C3899%2C3910%2C3915%2C3916%2C3937%2C3940%2C4052%2C4071%2C4076%2C4093%2C4104%2C4105%2C4155%2C4174%2C4183%2C4185%2C4187%2C4194%2C4203%2C4204%2C4208%2C4249%2C4298%2C4299%2C4306%2C4325%2C4327%2C4328%2C4336%2C4337%2C4342%2C4349%2C4359%2C4360%2C4363%2C4395%2C4482%2C4488%2C4489%2C4495%2C4496%2C4510%2C4511%2C4512%2C4559%2C4577%2C4742%2C4743%2C4844%2C4845%2C4961%2C4970%2C5061%2C5062%2C5064%2C5065%2C5067%2C5068%2C5074%2C5103%2C5266%2C5340%2C5455%2C5574%2C5596%2C5700%2C5702%2C5706%2C5707%2C5757%2C5776%2C5790%2C6116%2C6117%2C6164%2C6251%2C6252%2C6685%2C6750%2C6751%2C6762%2C6824%2C6833%2C7033%2C7066%2C7078%2C7312%2C7395%2C7440%2C7496%2C4554%2C6238%2C7609%2C7610%2C7612%2C3601%2C7667%2C7668%2C8022%2C7839%2C4670%2C8272%2C6207%2C8269%2C3563%2C4248%2C7693%2C8799%2C9895%2C9918%2C9954%2C10067%2C10141%2C10142%2C10143%2C10427%2C10491%2C3460%2C3461%2C3508%2C3509%2C3510%2C3542%2C3557%2C3660%3B&customTargeting=%2F71347885%2F_main_independent%2Fin_news%2Fin_world%2Fin_americas%2Fin_americas_article&playsinline=true

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The predators were reintroduced in Yellowstone in 1995 but remain at the centre of a debate in the US between conservationists who argue that the US wolf population needs protection, and hunters and farmers who argue that rising predator numbers are out of control.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/wolf-926f-spitfire-killed-hunter-yellowstone-national-park-lamar-valley-a8660741.html

7 Tons, One Shot

Hank Konrad: hunter

http://www.methownet.com/grist/features/konrad_hunting.html

It’s not every day that you can walk into a local supermarket and find an African lion attacking a warthog right there by the checkout counters – unless you’re shopping at Hank’s Harvest Foods in Twisp.

The lion and warthog are among dozens of trophy animals from Africa, Canada and a smattering of other countries on display at the store, most of them sharing space with an assortment of merchandise stacked above the freezer cases.

“I ran out of room at home so I brought some of them down here for the kids to see,” explains Hank Konrad, store owner and passionate hunter.

Each animal has a story. For example, that male lion from Zambia that’s about to dine on the warthog was probably six or seven years old when he died. He had 19 females in his pride and is believed to have fathered three cycles of cubs, Konrad said. But after losing his pride and territory to another male, he was found wandering hungry and alone. He was so thin his ribs and spine stuck out, according to Jackson Konrad, Hank’s son, who was with him on the trip.

photoJudy and Hank Konrad pose with a greater kudu bull, a woodland antelope, taken for meat in Botswana last year while they were hunting in the Kalahari. Photo courtesy of Hank Konrad

“I tracked him for 12 days because I didn’t want to bait him,” Hank said. Finally, the lion came into the open. “He stopped and looked back.” It was the only moment Konrad had to take a shot and he didn’t hesitate.

The warthog is from Zimbabwe. “I shot him [on a different trip] so we could have dinner,” Konrad explained. The warthog skull that’s part of the exhibit is from the animal on display; the lion skull is not.

Both animals were restored to life-like prime by a taxidermist friend who lives outside Missoula, Mont. He’s worked on all the African animals for Konrad, who said he prefers poses and facial expressions that are as natural as possible – no snarls and added drama. He doesn’t discuss the business side of his passion, but Konrad said, “I’m not taking anything out of the store [to pay] for hunting.”

photoA male Himalayan Tahr, a wild goat with a lion-like mane, watches over grocery shoppers. Konrad shot it in New Zealand, where Tahr goats are hunted for meat. Photo by Karen West

And while he’s hunted many kinds of animals, Konrad said, “I’m not a scorekeeper kind of guy.” In fact, after about two dozen trips to Africa, elephants are the only animal he hunts there – unless “somebody wants something to eat.” Why? “Because it’s the biggest challenge… I’m not a killer. I’m a hunter.”

It takes absolute focus, he explained, to stand face-to-face with a charging bull elephant, knowing he wants to kill you and you want to drop him with a single shot to the brain so he dies instantly. Konrad said he’s never missed that shot. His elephant gun holds two .500 Nitro cartridges and the tracker who accompanies him also has a rifle – just in case.

One year he shot a bull that weighed 14,000 pounds. It was estimated to be about 70 years old, the upper end of an elephant’s lifespan. He only had one molar left in his mouth and couldn’t chew food properly, said Konrad, who started hunting as a child.

“I was born in the woods, outside Grangeville,” Idaho, into a family that raised some cattle, ran a small logging operation and worked as outfitters during elk hunting season, he said. His mother was a quarter Nez Perce and his dad a quarter Crow.

When he was in high school, Konrad recalled, “I used to get on the school bus every Friday with my rifle and my pack and nobody blinked an eye.” After school, he went to a ranch for target practice. “All the kids with pickups in the [school] parking lot had rifles in the rack,” he added. “Nobody shot anybody.”

He is a life member of Safari Club International, the Wild Sheep Foundation, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the Mule Deer Foundation and the National Rifle Association. His three kids were trained in firearm safety and his six grandchildren will be, too. He said he opposes gun control.

He also said the United States government has gotten too big and is weakening the country. “We need to be self reliant again,” Konrad said. “We’ve taught our children that somebody else is responsible for everything. But that’s not the way it is.”

Self-reliance, by his definition, means taking care of your own – your kids, parents and the people in your own community — and not expecting the government to do it.

Konrad is legendary for quietly extending a generous helping hand in the community. “There’s nothing I won’t do for a working man but there’s nothing I’ll do for a man who won’t,” he said.

photoHank Konrad displays an 84-pound elephant tusk, one of the pair he has from his 2012 hunt in Botswana. Since the mid-1980s all elephant tusks being shipped from Africa are assigned a serial number to help track the ivory. Hunters must have permits and document their hunts with photographs. Konrad donates the hide and all meat to local villagers. Photo by Karen West

Hard work has been a hallmark of his life. He said his great-grandmother, Eva Cash, long ago told him: “All good things come to he who waits as long as he works like hell while he’s waiting.”

In 1975, Konrad moved to Twisp with his wife, Judy, a native of Lewiston, Idaho, and his brother and his wife. They bought the ‘Buckingham Palace’ grocery store, which was located where the Confluence Gallery is today.

“I worked 15 hours a day, seven days a week,” Konrad said. “I took a half-day off when Stephanie was born.” Stephanie is the eldest of the Konrad’s three children. She’s living in Wyoming, although her son works at the store. So do the Konrad’s other two children – daughter, Carlan, and son, Jackson, who runs the meat shop. Judy Konrad works in the office. Hank’s Harvest Foods employs 54 people, making it one of the largest employers in the valley.

Over the years, Konrad has had several businesses in addition to the grocery store including an excavating company and a well-digging business. He’s also invested in real estate. The family lives on a 1,000 acre ranch put together over the years up Finley Canyon, where the kids can learn about life by roaming the hills, hunting, fishing in the lake and riding their ATVs where grandpa designates so they don’t “tear up the land.” And you can bet they know the stories of the animals in his trophy room.

Konrad said he likes to travel “but I want to go into the bush and meet the real people.” Judy accompanies him and does some hunting, although she also travels with a group of friends to tourist sites and countries he doesn’t care about. His first trip outside the United States was with the U.S. Army to Vietnam, where he spent part of three different years. There he befriended an “old Frenchman” who talked to him about the place.

His passion for Africa was ignited years later when he saw some films about hunting there. It looked challenging. But the appeal has many facets – the expanses of land, the quiet, “tracking in the African bush and meeting the indigenous people who live out there” for whom hunting “is a way of life.”

photoAbout two dozen white tail and mule deer trophies are on display above the freezer cases. Photo by Karen West

Konrad said he hunts on government lands that are equivalent to our Forest Service lands, where the herds are managed and park rangers set the quotas on the number of permits issued.

The Safari Club promotes hunting and conservation by taking care of the animal populations, he said. It also sponsors anti-poaching teams. “Africa, right now, would pretty much be without animals if it wasn’t for Safari Club International.”

“Hunting is a positive thing for all animals because it gives them a value and without it, they’re gone,” Konrad said. “The trophy fee for an elephant can feed a village for a year, plus they get the meat.”

If he gets an elephant permit this year, Hank and Judy Konrad will make what he expects to be their last elephant-hunting trip to Botswana in August. The permits for where he wants to go may be auctioned off to some very wealthy bidders, he said, which could change his plan. That would be a bittersweet decision for a man who has tracked elephants up to 60 miles through the African bush that so strongly calls to him.

3/4/2013

James Woods calls for ‘licensed hunting of poachers’ following Idaho game commissioner controversy

WARNING: Article contains graphic photo.

Oscar-nominated actor James Woods took to Twitter on Monday morning to denounce the practice of trophy hunting, presumably after learning of the controversy surrounding former Idaho Fish and Game Commissioner Blake Fischer.

“Honestly some things are just obvious, so please stop selling this nonsense that killing innocent wildlife helps conserve the species. It’s just bull—-,” posted Woods, alongside a link to an article concerning Fischer and his vacation in Africa, during which he claimed to have killed “a whole family of baboons.”

“Killing these glorious creatures is barbaric,” Woods added. “Just stop it.”

BIG-GAME HUNTER AND FORMER BEAUTY QUEEN BLASTED OVER HUNTING COMMENTS

Woods also responded to critics on Twitter who defended conservationists, saying that he was specifically referring to the practice of trophy hunting.

“I eat hamburgers. Somebody does the killing. I’m not going to get holier-than-thou about hunters. If you’re a carnivore, then somebody has to do the killing. But killing for a “trophy” is absurd. What I’d really like to see is the licensed hunting of poachers,” he tweeted.

Woods also called hunting exotic animals on regulated land “vile,” and suggested that sport hunters should hunt each other to create a more “level playing field.”

Woods’ posts came days after news of Fischer’s trip to Africa came to light, along with photos of the animals Fischer and his wife had shot in Namibia, which included a leopard and giraffe, among others.

“First day [my wife] wanted to watch me, and ‘get a feel’ of Africa,” Fischer reportedly recounted in an email to over 100 friends and co-workers following his trip, according to a public records request from the Boise’s KBOI and The Idaho Statesman. “So I shot a whole family of baboons.”

Fischer, who resigned Monday following a request from Idaho Governor Butch Otter, had initially defended his actions, saying nothing he did was “illegal,” “unethical” or “immoral.” He also said he had paid a trophy fee to hunt certain species.

OKLAHOMA MAN FACES CHARGES FOR SHOOTING DEER HOURS BEFORE SEASON STARTED

Still, his actions were met with criticism from former fish and game officials in Idaho who saw the email, with two calling for his resignation and another requesting an apology for what they called unsportsmanlike hunting practices — especially in regards to the family of baboons.

“I’m sure what you did was legal, however, legal does not make it right,” said Frank Trevey, a former Idaho fish and game warden, to Fischer after seeing the email.

Gov. Butch Otter had also reportedly asked for Fischer to resign earlier in the day, the Statesman reported, saying “every member of my administration is expected to exercise good judgment. Commissioner Fischer did not.”

Fischer apologized to Idaho’s hunters and anglers in a resignation letter obtained by the paper.

“I recently made some poor judgments that resulted in sharing photos of a hunt in which I did not display an appropriate level of sportsmanship and respect for the animals I harvested,” he said, in part.

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Fischer was slated to serve a second term as a fish and game commissioner for Idaho, The Washington Post reported.

Fox News’ Edmund DeMarche contributed to this article.

“I didn’t do anything [currently] illegal.”

“I didn’t do anything illegal.”  

That was the feeble excuse made by Blake Fischer, the Idaho Fish & Game commissioner who—like so many others before him—posed grinning and gloating in one morbid photo after another with the animals he’d mindlessly murdered.

How many leopards must be reduced to props for these tweaked sportsmen’s arrogant pleasures, before the laws protecting them are brought into at least the 20th century?

He might not have done anything “illegal,” but impaling to death with arrows and posing alongside an entire family of freshly-killed baboons breaks a lot of taboos, besides being in excessively poor taste for a supposed wildlife official.

And although his actions may not currently be “illegal,” who could really blame someone for doing something in response that was?

 

Psychopathic killers should not be placed in charge of threatened, endangered, or other wild animal species. Please call for Blake Fischer to be relieved of his position by contacting the Idaho Department of Fish and Game at 208-334-3700 or posting a comment on the department’s Facebook page.

Hunter gets death threats after posting picture of grizzly bear he just killed

Rob WaughMonday 17 Sep 2018 11:48 am Share this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messenger A hunter has received death threats after posting images where he posed with a dead grizzly bear he had just killed. Former professional hockey player Tim Brent, 34, posted the images after killing the bear in Yukon, Canada. Brent said, ‘Alright folks, here is my Mountain Grizzly! We put an awesome stalk on him but he spotted us at about 75 yards. ‘Instead of taking off he turned and came right at us. It was very easy to tell this bear owned the valley we were hunting in and wasn’t scared of anything!’ 999 operator describes harrowing 40 minute call with mother she couldn’t save in Grenfell In another photo, Brent poses holding up the dead animal’s paw saying, ‘Did you know on average a single Grizzly eats around 40 Moose and Caribou calves during each calving season?’ The posts provoked a flood of anger and revulsion when he shared them on Instagram – with some commenters posting death threats. Some posters said they hoped he would be mauled to death by a bear – and one suggested they would call in a ‘Mexican cartel’ to kill him. In response, a defiant Brent posted images of his fridge filled with meat from animals he has killed. Share this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messenger

 

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2018/09/17/hunter-gets-death-threats-after-posting-picture-of-grizzly-bear-he-just-killed-7952015/?ito=cbshare

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MetroUK | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MetroUK/


A former Canadian pro-hockey player has come under fire after tweeting about hunting and killing a grizzly bear earlier this week.

Posting on Twitter a photo of himself posing with the bear, 34-year-old Tim Brent said they’d ‘put an awesome stalk on him’.

Explaining that the animal had spotted them at about 75 yards, he added: “Instead of taking off he turned and came right at us. It was very easy to tell this boar owned the valley we were hunting in and wasn’t scared of anything!”

Brent, who used to play for the Toronto Maple Leafs in Canada’s National Hockey League, has since also posted photos of ‘his’ Yukon moose, which he said ‘absolutely humbled’ him.

Brent has since received backlash for both his hunting habits and openly boasting about them. His tweet where he poses with the dead bear has racked up 20,000 comments.

It’s even caught the attention of several big names, including comedian Ricky Gervais, who regularly speaks out about animal rights. He tweeted: “I bet killing this beautiful bear put ‘an awesome stalk’ on Tim too.”

Sherlock actor Amanda Abbington also condemned Brent’s actions – and was clearly not holding back, writing: “You are a c***. A stupid, inbred, unfeeling piece of s*** c***.”

Others said the photo and caption were ‘disgusting’, ‘horrible’ and ‘nauseating’.

Brent later tweeted to say he’d even received death threats, writing: “These are the types of messages I am getting on twitter in response to my moose and bear hunts.

“I would love to know what constitutes a threat or abuse for Twitter? This is what we are up against as Hunters.”

Featured Image Credit: Twitter/Tim Brent

Fierce critic of Wyoming grizzly bear hunt scores license

https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/fierce-critic-of-wyoming-grizzly-bear-hunt-scores-license/

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — A fierce critic of grizzly bear hunting who has made a career photographing the animals has drawn a tag for Wyoming’s first such hunt in 44 years.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reported Thursday that Tom Mangelsen drew No. 8 on an issuance list that will allow up to 10 grizzly hunters into the field starting Sept. 15. He was up against 3,500 Wyoming residents and 2,327 nonresidents vying for a shot at the tags.

Mangelsen, who credited being chosen to “dumb luck,” was among scores of people from around the country who applied for the tags as a means of civil disobedience intended to slow the hunt. Wildlife managers say the tactic is legal.

The hunt for which Mangelsen’s tag is valid will end after the first female bear is killed. Up to 10 male grizzlies can be killed.

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Information from: Jackson Hole (Wyo.) News And Guide, http://www.jhnewsandguide.com

American hunter rips critics who bashed her for shooting giraffe and taking photos celebrating kill

American hunter rips critics who bashed her for shooting giraffe and taking photos celebrating kill
Tess Thompson Talley posted photos of herself with the giraffe she killed in 2017, but began making the rounds on social media in June. (Getty Images/iStockphoto)

 

An American hunter who sparked outrage with photos that show her striking a victorious pose in front of a giraffe she killed in South Africa is hitting back at her critics.

The controversial images, initially shared by Kentucky native Tess Thompson Talley in 2017, began making the rounds on social media after the Twitter account for Africa Digest posted them online toward the end of June. The obscure news website described her as a “white American Savage who is partly neanderthal.”

View image on TwitterView image on Twitter

AfricaDigest@africlandpost

White american savage who is partly a neanderthal comes to Africa and shoot down a very rare black giraffe coutrsey of South Africa stupidity. Her name is Tess Thompson Talley. Please share

Celebrities including actress Debra Messing and comedian Ricky Gervais were quick to join conservationists slamming the Kentucky hunter, but Talley has since rejected their fiery animal rights advocacy. In a statement to Fox News, she explained that she killed the old giraffe to prevent it from killing younger calves — a practice called “conservation through game management.”

“The giraffe I hunted was the South African sub-species of giraffe. The numbers of these sub-species is actually increasing due, in part, to hunters and conservation efforts paid for in large party by big game hunting,” she said. “The breed is not rare in any way other than it was very old. Giraffes get darker with age.”

While fewer than 100,000 giraffes remain on the continent, the sub-species Talley hunted has seen a 167% increase in population — up about 21,000 — since 1979. Meanwhile, the overall giraffe population has decreased by as much as 40%.

Talley also noted the giraffe, about 18 years old and unable to breed, has so far killed three younger bulls able to breed, ultimately curbing the growth of its herd.

When she first posted the photos more than a year ago, she described her South Africa trip as a “dream hunt.”

“Spotted this rare black giraffe bull and stalked him for quite a while,” she wrote. “I knew it was the one. He was over 18 years old, 4,000 lbs. and was blessed to be able to get more than 2,000 lbs. of meat from him.”

Trophy hunting is legal in several African countries, including South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe.

“People will say stuff behind a computer screen they’d never say to your face. She was hunting in South Africa and giraffes are legal to hunt in South Africa,” Paul Babaz, the president of hunting advocacy group Safari Club International, told CBS.

The trophy fee for a giraffe is about $2,000 to $3,000 per animal, with the funds going toward the nearby community. It helps prevent poaching and provides incentive to make sure big game animals don’t become instinct, according to Babaz.

“Without that… the poachers will come in and kill the animals indiscriminately, which is very unfortunate,” he said.