Zimbabwean authorities restrict hunting after Cecil the lion killing

Posted: Aug 01, 2015 11:30 AM PDT <em class=”wnDate”>Saturday, August 1, 2015 2:30 PM EDT</em>Updated: Aug 01, 2015 11:30 AM PDT <em class=”wnDate”>Saturday, August 1, 2015 2:30 PM EDT</em>

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    • Zimbabwe: American lion killer’s extradition being sought

      Zimbabwe: American lion killer’s extradition being sought

      Updated: Friday, July 31 2015 1:29 PM EDT2015-07-31 17:29:19 GMTJul 31, 2015 10:29 AM PDTJul 31, 2015 10:29 AM PDT
      Oppah Muchinguri, theZimbabwean Minister of Environment, Water and Climate addresses a press conference in Harare, Zimbabwe, Friday, July, 31, 2015. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)Oppah Muchinguri, theZimbabwean Minister of Environment, Water and Climate addresses a press conference in Harare, Zimbabwe, Friday, July, 31, 2015. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
      Zimbabwe intends to seek the extradition of an American dentist who killed a lion that was lured out of a national park and shot with a bow and a gun, and the process has already begun, a Cabinet minister said Friday. In the Zimbabwean government’s first official comment on the killing of Cecil the lion, the environment, water and climate minister lashed out at Walter James Palmer, accusing him even of trying to hurt Zimbabwe’s image.More >>
      Zimbabwe intends to seek the extradition of an American dentist who killed a lion that was lured out of a national park and shot with a bow and a gun, and the process has already begun, a Cabinet minister said Friday. In the Zimbabwean government’s first official comment on the killing of Cecil the lion, the environment, water and climate minister lashed out at Walter James Palmer, accusing him even of trying to hurt Zimbabwe’s image.More >>
    • HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe has suspended the hunting of lions, leopards and elephants in an area where a lion popular with tourists was killed, and is investigating the killing of another lion in April that may have been illegal, the country’s wildlife authority said Saturday.

In addition, bow and arrow hunts have been suspended unless they are approved by the head of the director of the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, the organization said. The authority said it only received information this week about the possibly illegal killing of a lion in April. An arrest has been made in that case, officials said.

The announcement follows an international outcry stemming from an American hunter’s killing of a lion named Cecil that was allegedly was lured out of a national park. Zimbabwean authorities say the hunt was illegal and are seeking the extradition of Minnesota dentist Walter James Palmer.

Palmer is believed to have shot the lion with a bow on July 1 outside Hwange National Park after it was lured onto private land with a carcass of an animal, Zimbabwean conservationists have said. The wounded cat was later tracked down and Palmer allegedly killed it with a gun, they said. Two Zimbabweans — a professional hunter and a farm owner — have been arrested for the killing.

More: http://www.abc3340.com/story/29687102/zimbabwean-authorities-restrict-hunting-after-cecil-the-lion-killing

Cecil the lion’s brother, Jericho, is also illegally killed in Zimbabwe …

CNN  – ‎31 minutes ago‎
(CNN) The brother of slain Cecil the lion, named Jericho, was killed Saturday in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe, a senior park official told CNN.

This Is How Many Animals Were Killed in Zimbabwe in the Last 20 Years

Originally posted on TIME:

The death of Cecil the lion at the hands of pilloried dentist Walter Palmer has sparked worldwide outrage, with virtual mobs tanking Palmer’s Yelp ratings, real mobs leaving angry messages at his office, and activists and celebrities alike calling for his metaphorical (or literal) head. But the tragic death of one lion belies a much more widespread and serious problem affecting wildlife in Zimbabwe.

The landlocked, southern African nation is one of the hardest-hit places on the continent when it comes to the killing of big game, both legal and illegal. It is a country where, Slate reports, “hunters exported 49 lion trophies in 2013 alone” and where, since Cecil’s death “it’s likely that at least a dozen other lions have been shot by trophy hunters.”A 2013 study in the journal Public Library of Science estimates that 96 lions were hunted per year between 1996 and 2006 in the…

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Jimmy Kimmel’s Plea for Cecil the Lion Leads to More than $150,000 in Donations

Originally posted on TIME:

When late night host Jimmy Kimmel made an emotional plea on his show on Tuesday night that the death of 13-year-old Zimbabwean lion Cecil not be in vain, an outpouring of support was to be expected, but the magnitude of that generosity proved remarkable.

According to The Wrap, Oxford’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit—whose website was flashed on the screen for 25 seconds at the end of Kimmel’s segment on Cecil the Lion—netted more than $150,000 donations from 2,600 people in less than 24 hours. The unit had been responsible for tracking Cecil’s whereabouts until his untimely demise.

“Jimmy Kimmel implored his millions of listeners in the U.S.A. to make donations to support our work on lions, and conservation more widely,” Wildlife Conservation Research Unit director David McDonald said on the organization’s website. “We are so grateful for this and for the up-welling of support for our work worldwide.”

Cecil…

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Zimbabwe Wants to Extradite Cecil the Lion’s Killer From the U.S.

Originally posted on TIME:

(HARARE, Zimbabwe)—Zimbabwe will seek the extradition of an American dentist who killed a lion that was lured out of a national park and caused international outrage, a Cabinet minister said Friday.

In the Zimbabwean government’s first official comment on the killing of Cecil the lion, the environment, water and climate minister lashed out at Walter James Palmer, accusing him even of trying to hurt Zimbabwe’s image.

“Unfortunately it was too late to apprehend the foreign poacher as he had already absconded to his country of origin,” Oppah Muchinguri told a news conference. “We are appealing to the responsible authorities for his extradition to Zimbabwe so that he be made accountable.”

On Tuesday, Palmer issued a statement saying he relied on his guides to ensure the hunt was legal. Two Zimbabweans — a professional hunter and a farm owner — have been arrested in the killing of the lion, an act…

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Oil Ship Leaves Portland After Police Force Greenpeace Protestors Off Bridge

Originally posted on TIME:

An controversial oil ship managed to sail past a group of Greenpeace protestors hanging from a bridge in Portland after police and Coast Guard officers forced the activists from the area.

The protestors had gathered to block a Royal Dutch Shell icebreaking vessel from leaving the area to head to a oil drilling site in the Arctic. Environmental activists had suspended themselves from the St. Johns bridge and formed a line of kayaks along the Willamette River in an effort to block the ship from leaving the city, but the ship, named Fennica, managed to slip through a gap in the dangling protestors just before 6:00 p.m. Pacific time.

For about six hours, according to localoutlets, there was relative quiet. But Thursday afternoon, the Coast Guard and local officials began insisting that the protestors move.

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Dentist Who Killed Cecil the Lion Writes Letter Apologizing to His Patients

Originally posted on TIME:

The Minnesota dentist who is the target of international outrage for killing a beloved lion in Zimbabwe wrote a letter to his patients this week apologizing for any inconvenience the media attention has caused.

Dr. Walter Palmer lured Cecil the lion with a dead animal attached to a car during a hunting trip with guides. The lion was shot with a bow and arrow and then a gun before he was beheaded and skinned. In the letter, published by Fox 9, Palmer explains that he had no idea the lion was part of a study and that he will cooperate with U.S. and Zimbabwean authorities.

Here is the letter’s full text:

To my valued patients: As you may have already heard, I have been in the news over the last few days for reasons that have nothing to do with my profession or the care I provide for…

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Deforestation Climate Risk Bigger Than Carbon

Originally posted on GarryRogers Nature Conservation and Science Fiction (#EcoSciFi):

Deforestation

Peer-reviewed report says that clearing tropical rainforests distorts Earth’s wind and water systems and has impacts far beyond the implications for carbon dioxide. Farmers and food supply potentially at risk as global warming and skewed rainfall could wreak havoc with crops—from coffee to corn—in world’s breadbaskets

“A new study presents powerful evidence that clearing trees not only spews carbon into the atmosphere, but also triggers major shifts in rainfall and increased temperatures worldwide that are just as potent as those caused by current carbon pollution. Further, the study finds that future agricultural productivity across the globe is at risk from deforestation-induced warming and altered rainfall patterns.

“The report, “Effects of Tropical Deforestation on Climate Change and Agriculture,” published today in Nature Climate Change and released in collaboration with Climate Focus provides the most comprehensive analysis to date of the climate impacts of tropical forest destruction on agriculture in the…

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NASA: Evidence for Global Climate Change

Originally posted on GarryRogers Nature Conservation and Science Fiction (#EcoSciFi):

The Earth’s climate has changed throughout history. Just in the last 650,000 years there have been seven cycles of glacial advance and retreat, with the abrupt end of the last ice age about 7,000 years ago marking the beginning of the modern climate era — and of human civilization. Most of these climate changes are attributed to very small variations in Earth’s orbit that change the amount of solar energy our planet receives.

Scientific evidence for warming of the climate system is unequivocal.
– Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years.1

Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about our planet and its climate on a global scale. Studying these…

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Massive Mine Could Destroy One of the Last Best Places for Bull Trout and Grizzly Bears

By Katherine O’Brien | Friday, July 17, 2015

Montana—where I’m fortunate to live and work—is often called “the last best place.” The moniker is a tribute to what makes our state unique: vast expanses of undeveloped land on a scale that can be found in few places in the lower 48. This unspoiled wildness makes Montana an incredible place to explore and an invaluable area for wildlife conservation.

In the northwest corner of the state is a place that epitomizes some of the best features of our nation’s remaining wild spaces. The Cabinet Mountains Wilderness is a 35-mile expanse of glaciated peaks that supports countless species of native wildlife, including mountain goats, bighorn sheep, pikas, wolverines, moose, elk, deer, wolves, mountain lions and Canada lynx. The Cabinet Mountains also harbor populations of grizzly bears and bull trout—threatened species protected by the Endangered Species Act. These species are now under even greater threat from a proposed copper and silver mine in the core of their wilderness habitat.

More:

http://earthjustice.org/blog/2015-july/massive-mine-could-destroy-one-of-the-last-best-places-for-bull-trout-and-grizzly-bears?utm_source=crm&utm_content=Minesbutton&curation=ebrief

Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson, 2015. All Rights Reserved

Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson, 2015. All Rights Reserved