“Recreational Shooting Opportunities” Have Taken Their Toll

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

Article posted by C.A.S.H. Committee To Abolish Sport Hunting

CLICK HERE for more from CASH COURIER NEWSLETTER, Fall 2016

If you want to read an exceptional book, or share it with your friends or acquaintances who aren’t yet convinced that hunting and the management of our wildlife has got to go, then please give them this book.

EXPOSING THE BIG GAME: Living Targets of a Dying Sport
BY JIM ROBERTSON

exposing the big game

You can purchase the book by emailing us at wildwatch@verizon.net or by calling us at 914-388-5221. For a donation to C.A.S.H. of a Basic Plus membership, you will receive a copy in the mail.

Excerpt from EXPOSING THE BIG GAME: LIVING TARGETS OF A DYING SPORT:

Every place I have lied in the West, I’ve been fortunate enough to locate or stumble upon the rare or secretive creatures native to the locality, be they cougars, wolves, grizzly bears, lynx, otters, fisher, mink…

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Fall from a tree stand – one man’s story

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

Please post to Outdoors. Suggested Photo Caption: In spite on continual warnings and easily available safety equipment, some Tennessee deer hunters will likely fall from a treestand this hunting season. Watch Tim Crawford’s compelling story and perhaps you’ll be inspired to keep yourself safe. (Photo courtesy Summit Treestands)

AA

The 2018 deer archery-only hunting season opens statewide in Tennessee on Saturday, Sept. 22. That is the day we are likely to start seeing news releases about hunters injured, or even killed, following a fall from a tree stand.

Hunters all the way back to prehistoric times, have always known that hunting from an elevated position gives the hunter an advantage. Anytime a hunter is in an elevated position, he or she can become “un-elevated” in an instant due to a simple slip or equipment malfunction. Last hunting season there…

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Like Hurricane Florence, Climate Policy Has Dangerously Stalled

The Extinction Chronicles

Call it “The Great Stall.” Hurricane Florence lingered over the Carolinas for four days, dumping some 30 inches of rain. Flood waters are still rising, even as Typhoon Mangkhut, a superstorm 500 miles across, rakes the Philippines and Hong Kong and crashes into China. Florence is just the latest in a long series of catastrophic events generated by stalled weather patterns — slow-moving systems which occur when one of the jet streams that flow around the Earth pinches off a massive section of air from normal wind flows for a prolonged period of time. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has compiled a long list of severe weather events in the US, and most of them are linked, in one way or another…

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Climatologist talks El Nino, the Blob, climate change

The Extinction Chronicles

By Katie FrankowiczThe Daily Astorian

Published on September 19, 2018 8:42AM

Last changed on September 19, 2018 8:50AM

Imagine a hangover that lasts for years.

In 2013 and 2014, a mass of warm water formed off the West Coast. The Blob, so named by Washington State Climatologist Nick Bond, persisted through 2015 and 2016 after a massive El Nino event hit and kept it alive. Temperatures inside the Blob were recorded at nearly 3 degrees C warmer than normal.

These were years marked by drought, sea bird and salmon die-offs, marine mammal starvation, extensive harmful algal blooms, razor clam and Dungeness fishery closures and beautiful warm summer days for North Coast residents.

The effects of each single event have bled into the following year…

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Demand an end to trapping of beavers

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

Join us in supporting our petition to end beaver trapping.

<http://www.thepetitionsite.com/>

<https://www.care2.com/go/z/e/A_ZJ4/zUMz/js4K>

Demand an end to trapping of beavers in Stanley Park Marsh.

Sign Now

“Drowning traps” are currently being used to kill beavers, so they don’t build dams, at Stanley Park Marsh in Canada. Drowning is a horribly cruel death that no animal should suffer. <https://www.care2.com/go/z/e/A_ZJ4/zUMz/js4K>

Concerned local people recently released a drowning beaver from one of these traps. That beaver was in absolute distress. The beaver was pulled to shore and when released it was exhausted. It caught its breath, groomed itself and slipped into the water, hopefully to survive after the trauma. Many more beavers will not be so lucky.

If it’s essential to stop dams being built in this particular area, non-lethal methods should be used, such as relocating the beavers to another park. But ideally, beavers should be allowed…

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Game hunter who enjoys killing exotic wildlife ‘for the adventure’ horrifies This Morning viewers

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

Game hunter who enjoys killing exotic wildlife ‘for the adventure’ horrifies This Morning viewers

Adam StarkeyWednesday 19 Sep 2018 11:59 am Share this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messenger 133 SHARES Phillip Schofield suggests that hunters should use spears Play Video Loaded: 0% 0:00Progress: 0% PlayMute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 1:01 Fullscreen This Morning viewers were outraged over a big game hunter who has killed over 100 species of wildlife for ‘the adventure’. The show raised the debate of hunting following a criticised picture showing a woman flaunting her record kill of a large male leopard. Olivia Opre, friend of the woman in question and fellow hunter, spoke to This Morning hosts Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby where she defended the actions of hunters. Olivia Opre appeared on This Morning (Picture: ITV) Asked what she’d shot, Olivia said: ‘There’s an extensive list. I’ve hunted…

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New web-based system in place to gather hunting data

Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog

Hunting
By The Associated Press |

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) – Maine wildlife managers are making it easier for hunters to register their big game animals with a new web-based system.

The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife says the new system’s running at tagging stations around the state. Department Commissioner Chandler Woodcock says the system will allow tagging stations and hunters to quickly register their animal.

Woodcock says one of the advantages of the new system will be to provide biologists and game wardens with real-time harvest data about game animals.

The system went into use on the first day of the bear season, Aug. 27. It replaces the old system of game registration booklets, which needed to be filled in by hand.

Maine has 215,000 licensed hunters. The new system will be available for fur tagging next year

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The pitfalls of simplification when looking at greenhouse gas emissions from livestock

Exposing the Big Game

http://news.trust.org/item/20180918083629-d2wf0/

What we choose to eat,  how we move around and how these activities contribute to climate change is receiving a lot of media attention. In this context, greenhouse gas emissions from livestock and transport are often compared, but in a flawed way.

The comparison measures direct emissions from transport against both direct and indirect emissions from livestock. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identifies and monitors human activities responsible for climate change and reports direct emissions by sectors. The IPCC estimates that direct emissions from transport (road, air, rail and maritime) account for 6.9 gigatons per year, about 14% of all emissions from human activities. These emissions mainly consist of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide from fuel combustion. By comparison, direct emissions from livestock account for 2.3 gigatons of CO2 equivalent, or 5% of the total. They consist of methane and nitrous oxide from rumen digestion…

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The pitfalls of simplification when looking at greenhouse gas emissions from livestock

 

http://news.trust.org/item/20180918083629-d2wf0/

What we choose to eat,  how we move around and how these activities contribute to climate change is receiving a lot of media attention. In this context, greenhouse gas emissions from livestock and transport are often compared, but in a flawed way.

The comparison measures direct emissions from transport against both direct and indirect emissions from livestock. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identifies and monitors human activities responsible for climate change and reports direct emissions by sectors. The IPCC estimates that direct emissions from transport (road, air, rail and maritime) account for 6.9 gigatons per year, about 14% of all emissions from human activities. These emissions mainly consist of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide from fuel combustion. By comparison, direct emissions from livestock account for 2.3 gigatons of CO2 equivalent, or 5% of the total. They consist of methane and nitrous oxide from rumen digestion and manure management. Contrary to transport, agriculture is based on a large variety of natural processes that emit (or leak) methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide from multiple sources. While it is possible to “de-carbonize” transport, emissions from land use and agriculture are much more difficult to measure and control.

Using a global life cycle approach, FAO estimated all direct and indirect emissions from livestock (cattle, buffaloes, goat, sheep, pigs and poultry) at 7.1 gigatons of CO2 equivalent per year, or 14.5% of all anthropogenic emissions reported by the IPCC. In addition to rumen digestion and manure, life cycle emissions also include those from producing feed and forages, which the IPCC reports under crops and forestry, and those from processing and transporting meat, milk and eggs, which the IPCC reports under industry and transport. Hence, we cannot compare the transport sector’s 14% as calculated by the IPCC, to the 14.5% of livestock using the life cycle approach.

Though it is the most systematic and comprehensive method for assessing environmental impacts according to the IPCC, there is no life cycle approach estimate available for the transport sector at a global level to our knowledge. Non-availability, uncertainty or variability of data limit its application. But several studies, including some reported by the IPCC, show that transport emissions increase significantly when considering the entire life cycle of fuel and vehicles, including emissions from extracting fuel and disposing of old vehicles. For example in the US, greenhouse gas emissions for the life cycle of passenger transport would be about 1.5 times higher than the operational ones.

Comparing transport and livestock raises another issue. Wealthy consumers, in both high and low income countries, who are rightly concerned about their individual carbon footprint, have options like driving less or choosing low carbon food. However, more than 820 million people are suffering from hunger and even more from nutrient deficiencies. Meat, milk and eggs are much sought after to address malnutrition. Out of the 767 million people living in extreme poverty, about half of them are pastoralists, smallholders or workers relying on livestock for food and livelihoods. The flawed comparison and negative press about livestock may influence development plans and investments and further increase their food insecurity.

Livestock emissions have come into particular focus because it generally takes more resources to produce beef than comparable other food items. Hence emissions from land-use change and feed production are high, in addition to enteric fermentation. Moreover, methane has a higher global warming potential than carbon dioxide but it’s lifespan in the atmosphere is only 12 years, which means that reducing methane emissions would have a positive impact on climate change in a much shorter time span.

Countries, particularly in Latin America, are responding to these challenges by developing low carbon livestock production that will achieve emission reductions at scale, focusing on emission intensity, soil carbon and pasture restoration, and better recycling of by-products and waste. Such programmes also produce a number of environmental and socio-economic co-benefits, like biodiversity and water conservation, or generation of rural employment and income.

The world needs both consumers that are aware of their food choices and producers and companies that engage in low carbon development. In that process, livestock can indeed make a large contribution to climate change mitigation, food security and sustainable development in general.

Anne Mottet is a Livestock Development Officer with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations in Rome, specialising in natural resource use efficiency and climate change. She has 15 years of work experience in research, quantitative analysis and strategic consulting to the agricultural sector.

Henning Steinfeld is head of the livestock sector analysis and policy branch at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations in Rome, Italy. He has been working on agricultural and livestock policy for the last 15 years, in particular focusing on environmental issues, poverty and public health protection. 

Nuclear Plant Declares Emergency, Second Breach Reported at Coal Ash Site Amid Florence’s Rains

The Extinction Chronicles

https://earthfirstjournal.org/newswire/2018/09/19/nuclear-plant-declares-emergency-second-breach-reported-at-coal-ash-site-amid-florences-rains/

by EA Crunden / Think Progress

A second breach was reported at a coal ash landfill site in North Carolina on Monday according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the latest impact from Hurricane Florence’s heavy rains. That update comes amid a state of emergency declared at a nuclear power plant overseen by the landfill’s operator, Duke Energy, as the extent of the damage from Florence — now a tropical depression — slowly becomes apparent.

The first Duke Energy Corp. coal ash landfill site experienced a breach on Saturday following an initial spill at the company’s Sutton Power Plant, which is near Wilmington where Florence first made landfall.

Reggie Cheatham, the EPA’s director for its Office of Emergency Management, told reporters Monday that the second spill occurred when some of the landfill’s water eroded, Bloomberg reported. The location of the second breach is not currently known to the EPA.

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