“Beast Feast” etc., from AR News…

Big Win for Animal Rights: Navy Sonars Are Killing Whales, US Court Rules
http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/25630/20160723/big-win-animal-rights-navy-sonars-killing-whales-united-states-court-rules.htm
“Blue whales can now live in peace and relative quiet after the Ninth
U.S. Circuit Court of San Francisco ruled out the U.S. Navy’s request
to use low-frequency sonar due to its potential harm to marine
animals.
“The U.S. Navy sought the approval from the National Marine Fisheries
Service to use the said sonar under the Marine Mammal Protection Act.
However, groups urged the Service to reassess, which led to their
decision not to give the go signal to the Navy’s request.”

Judge will allow animal rights’ vet to examine Cricket Hollow Zoo lions
http://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/public-safety/judge-will-allow-animal-rights-vet-to-examine-cricket-hollow-zoo-lions-20160722
“Animal Legal Defense Fund granted part of injunction”
“CEDAR RAPIDS — A federal judge Friday ordered owners of the Cricket
Hollow Zoo in Manchester to let a veterinarian examine two African
lions they are being sued over.”

A/w local OKC outdoor news:

Crossing Community Church, located in OKC, is having its annual “Beast
Feast” on Tuesday night.
Tickets are $15 each and there is a smoked pork dinner.
The guest speaker is a co-host of Inside Outdoors TV, based in Tulsa.
This show began their 10th season this month.
The “Beast Feast” includes a hunting and fishing expo with numerous
prizes to be given away.
This includes hunting trips, fishing trips, guns, rod and reels, knives and
gift cards.

Facing an uphill court fight, the US Fish and Wildlife Service announced
last week it was formally
removing the lesser prairie chicken from a federal protection list under
the Endangered Species Act.
This move follows recent court rulings in Texas that stripped the lesser
prairie chicken of federal
protection. However, federal officials say the removal doesn’t mean
authorities had concluded the
lesser prairie chicken didn’t warrant protection for biological reasons.
The agency stated “The service is undertaking a thorough re-evaluation
of the bird’s status and
the threats it faces using the best available scientific information to
determine anew whether listing
under the ESA is warranted.”
The previous rulings found that the Fish and Wildlife Service failed to
make a proper evaluation
of a multi-state conservation plan when it listed the lesser prairie
chicken as threatened.
Oil and gas groups had strongly opposed the threatened listing and
ranchers also opposed the
listing.
The lesser prairie chicken’s Great Plains habitat has shrunk by more
than 80 percent since
the 1800s and its population by 99 percent.
It lives primarily in Kansas. However, it also lives in Texas, New
Mexico, Okla. and Colorado.
To keep the birds off the endangered species list, these five states
organized their own
conservation program. It offers economic incentives to landowners and
companies who set
aside land to protect the birds.

 

13533278_1489665091056950_3215226751240158290_n

Ancient Forests, Wolves, Wildlife and The Wrangell Timber Sale 

intheshadowofthewolf

The U.S. Forest Service is seeking public comment on a proposed timber sale  on Wrangell Island, which is in the Alexander Archipelago in the Alaska Panhandle of southeastern Alaska. The island is just 30 miles long and 5 to 14 miles wide, contains an abundance of wildlife and is separated from the mainland by the Blake Channel.

The Forest Service released five alternatives in their draft environmental impact statement for the Wrangell Island Project on June 2nd. Its preferred alternative would allow two thirds of the acreage to be selectively harvested and a third clear cut, producing about 65 million board feet, and could build up to 17 miles of new national forest roads, some of which will stay open to the public and about 15 miles of temporary roads. The earliest timber sale would be mid to late summer 2017, and targets the largest, highest-value tree stands, which…

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Delisting wolves was a mistake (OPINION)

http://www.projectcoyote.org/delisting-wolves-was-a-mistake/

by | Nov 24, 2015 | Notes From the Field |

The decision by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission to delist wolves from the state’s Endangered Species Act protection was based on faulty science and political expediency. The biggest problem is with the department’s criteria for delisting — more than four breeding pairs of wolves for three years in a row— is that it fails to ensure full restoration of the wolf across the state. Many outside scientists, including myself, feel the small population of 80 to perhaps as many as 100 wolves statewide is hardily sufficient to guarantee a robust and speedy restoration of the species.

A hundred or fewer wolves may preclude the extinction of the species, but it does not restore the ecological function of the wolf. And restoring the ecological function of the species should be the prime goal of any conservation effort. Precluding extinction is a very low bar and does not serve the people of Oregon, the wolf or our ecosystems.

I did an analysis of the potential for wolf restoration in Oregon back in the 1990s and concluded that the state could easily support 1,500 to 2,000 wolves. Others have reached similar conclusions. Restoring wolves across the state so that they are functional members of the wildlife community should be the goal of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

If, hypothetically, elk were the species under consideration and were protected under the state’s Endangered Species Act, I can almost guarantee you ODFW would want way more than 100 individuals before they would recommend delisting. They would want to see elk restored across the state.

Wolves are in a sense a “keystone” species that influences ecosystem health. Having a token population of wolves is not the same as having a functioning ecosystem member. Wolves not only eliminate weaker prey individuals but can shift habitat use; for instance they can reduce elk and deer foraging on aspen, willows and other browse species in riparian areas. Wolves can also affect the distribution and numbers of other species. Where wolves are present, there are often fewer coyotes. Coyotes kill the smaller Sierra Nevada red fox that is just hanging on in the Cascades. Restoration of wolves could thus assist the recovery of the red fox.

The rush to delist wolves is driven by false perceptions of wolf impacts on livestock and big game populations. Out of 1.3 million cattle and 195,000 sheep in the state, only 114 domestic livestock have been confirmed killed by wolves since the first wolves appeared in the early 2000s. Comparisons between Montana and Oregon are often made by ODFW. Using Montana, in 2014, the state’s 600 or so wolves killed 35 cattle and six sheep out of a total of 2.5 million cattle and 220,000 sheep respectively, By comparison, non-wolf losses accounted for 89,000 deaths. And though six sheep were killed by wolves, some 7,800 sheep died from other causes, like weather.

Wolves are simply not a threat, or even barely a factor, in the economic viability of the livestock industry.

The idea that hunting will be negatively affected across any significant portion of the state is also unlikely. Between 2009 and 2014, all wildlife management units (WMUs) of northeastern Oregon with established wolf packs had increasing elk populations, and two of the four (Imnaha and Snake River) were above the established management objectives for elk since wolves became established (ODFW data).

A similar situation exists in Montana, where elk numbers grew from an estimated 89,000 animals in 1992 (Montana Elk Plan) to 167,000 elk today (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, 2015). If this is what you get with wolf predation, I think most reasonable hunters would agree we could use more wolves in Oregon!

In the end, ODFW capitulated to mythology and false fears of hunters and ranchers without providing context and did not meet its wildlife responsibilities under the public trust doctrine to work diligently for full restoration of the ecological function of the wolf.

George Wuerthner lives in Bend.

Comments regarding the proposed delisting of gray wolves in Oregon from Adrian TrevesProject Coyote Science Advisory Board member

From the Arctic to Africa to the Amazon, More Troubling Signs of Earth Carbon Store Instability

robertscribbler

The time for debate is over. The time for rapid response is now. The Earth System just can’t take our fossil-fueled insults to her any longer.

*****

Arctic Wildfires

(These Arctic and Siberian wildfires just keep getting worse and worse, but what’s really concerning is they’re burning a big hole through one of the Earth’s largest carbon sinks, and as they do it, they’re belching out huge plumes of greenhouse gasses. Image source: LANCE MODIS.)

Carbon Spikes over the Arctic, Africa, and the Amazon

Today, climate change-enhanced wildfires in Siberia and Africa are belching out two hellaciously huge smoke clouds (see images below). They’re also spewing large plumes of methane and carbon dioxide, plainly visible in the global atmospheric monitors. Surface methane readings in these zones exceed 2,000 parts per billion, well above the global atmospheric average.

Even as the fires rage, bubbles of methane and carbon dioxide are reportedly seeping…

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Why I Don’t Hunt

I could go on and on about how hunting is an outdated, cruel and unusual sport. The simple fact is, the animals are my friends, and I don’t kill and eat my friends; not for sport, for flesh and certainly not for trophies. No matter how much it might make me feel proud, temporarily satiated, stuffed or thrilled, the kill would not be worth it once the temporary insanity wore off.

Text and wildlife photography by Jim Robertson

Text and wildlife photography by Jim Robertson

 

Bear won’t be put down in Alberta grizzly attack

431125_10150547334526188_1114807436_n

The bear was acting in a natural, defensive manner, park officials say

By David Bell, CBC News
< http://www.cbc.ca/news/cbc-news-online-news-staff-list-1.1294364> Posted:
Jul 20, 2016 4:21 PM MT Last Updated: Jul 20, 2016 6:07 PM MT

The actions of a grizzly bear that attacked a couple in the Waiparous area
northwest of Calgary on Tuesday are being considered defensive and the bear
will not be euthanized, according to an investigation into the incident.
James Hayworth and his wife, Laura, were enjoying a beautiful day by the
Ghost River when a mother grizzly charged out of the woods and attacked
them.
“The cubs stumbled upon the man and the woman, and the sow then reacted to
protect her cubs,” said Brendan Cox with Alberta Justice, which oversees the
Fish and Wildlife department.
“So the bears will be left alone. They’re going to be given the space they
need to move on.”
“I thought for sure I’m going to die. I’m dead,” Hayworth told CBC News on
Tuesday.
James was left with scrapes, cuts and bruises while Laura suffered a broken
arm and multiple puncture wounds and was transported to a hospital in
Calgary. She was released on Wednesday.
The area of the attack – from Bar C Ranch west along the TransAlta road to
Banff National Park – will remain closed until further notice.
Cox said Fish and Wildlife officers will be monitoring the situation
closely.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/alberta-grizzly-attack-defensive-1.368
8023

Trump Jr. wants his dad to put him in charge of federal parks and lands

http://grist.org/politics/trump-jr-wants-his-dad-to-put-him-in-charge-of-federal-parks-and-lands/

Donald Trump is butting heads with the GOP establishment over the issue of federal lands. Republican orthodoxy calls for handing them over to the states. But when asked about the issue in January, Trump said, “I don’t like the idea because I want to keep the lands great, and you don’t know what the state is going to do.”

Turns out there’s one very specific reason Trump wants to keep the lands great: because his sons like to kill animals on them — his eldest son in particular.

Donald Trump Jr., a hunter of big game as well as smaller defenseless animals, recently shared his own views on public lands with The New Yorker. “I’m in the fortunate position to be able to buy some land on my own, but not everyone has that ability,” Jr. said. “As it stands, if the states get the lands back, they could remain public or they could be sold off. So, say you have a ten-thousand-acre area. Well, a state could turn that into fifty golf courses that would be private and exclusive.”

While this may not bring in votes from the golf club contingent, Jr. has been actively hunting the sportsman vote, as E&E Daily reports. He invited reporters along on a pheasant hunting trip in January, and has given exclusive interviews to Field & Stream, Bowhunter Magazine, and Deer & Deer Hunting. His father was the only presidential candidate to speak at the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s annual trade show in Las Vegas.

Big ambition runs in the family: Trump Jr. told the magazine Petersen’s Hunting that he would like to be secretary of the interior in his father’s administration. He is, to be sure, completely unqualified, but that’s never stopped a Trump before. “Between my brother and myself, no one understands the issues better than us,” Jr. told Petersen’s. “No one in politics lives the lifestyle more than us.” No one.

Big egos, it seems, run in the family as well.

 

El Nino is Basically Over — But this Global Coral Bleaching Event Just Won’t End

robertscribbler

Back in 2014, an unsuspecting world was on the verge of a major global temperature increase. But despite warnings from scientists like Dr. Kevin Trenberth that deep ocean warming had sped up and would eventually result in rapid surface warming, the big media meme at the time was that global warming had ‘paused.’ Originating in The Economist, and swiftly spreading to numerous other news outlets, this particular blast of bad information fed the public a big helping of false sense of security.

In 2014 through 2016, maximum global temperatures jumped from around 0.65 degrees Celsius to around 1 C above the 20th-century average. In just three years’ time, the whole of the Earth’s surface had warmed by about 0.35 C. This is like cramming all of the warming from 1880 to 1980 into the three-year 2014-to-2016 period. Never before in all of the global climate record starting in the late…

View original post 795 more words

Man steals, crashes boat belonging to hunter who killed Cecil the lion

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/police-man-steals-crashes-boat-belonging-to-hunter-who-killed-cecil-the-lion/ar-BBuDdDW?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp

8 / 21

USA TODAY
Alexi C. Cardona3 hrs ago
In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park in Hwange, Zimbabwe.© Andy Loveridge, AP In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park in Hwange, Zimbabwe. NAPLES, Fla. — A stolen boat that crashed off of Marco Island in the Gulf of Mexico last weekend belongs to the Minnesota dentist who sparked international fury after killing Cecil the lion last summer at a national park in Africa, police said.

Andrew Derwin, 26, of Marco Island was arrested Tuesday on a felony grand theft charge. Police said he stole and crashed a boat belonging to Walter Palmer off Caxambas Pass on the southern end of Marco Island.

Officials initially were called to reports of a boat crash at the Caxambas Park Marina on Sunday afternoon.

Marco Island Fire Rescue and Collier County EMS performed first aid on a passenger, Nicolas Stolinas, who suffered serious injuries when struck by the vessel’s propeller.

Police said they soon learned the boat had been stolen and was registered to Palmer.

Derwin, Palmer’s neighbor, took the keys to the boat from the rear lanai of Palmer’s home Sunday, according to Marco Island police.

A woman who watches over Palmer’s house told officials the Minnesota dentist left the keys on the lanai for a boat maintenance person to service the vessel. Palmer was supposed to let the woman know when to take the boat keys back inside the house.

The boat is valued at $61,175.

Collier County Sheriff’s Office arrest records state Derwin has been arrested 13 times on various charges, including driving under the influence, forgery…

More: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/police-man-steals-crashes-boat-belonging-to-hunter-who-killed-cecil-the-lion/ar-BBuDdDW?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp

HUNTING ACCIDENTS AND VIOLATIONS from C.A.S.H. Committee To Abolish Sport Hunting

http://all-creatures.org/cash/accident-center.html

2016 Reports

See Previous Reports: 2003-2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015

HOW SAFE IS HUNTING?
Judge for Yourself…

See: How Safe is Hunting by Young People? See the Statistics

2016 HUNTING ACCIDENTS

June

May

April

March

February

January

2016 HUNTING / FISHING VIOLATIONS

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

HARASSMENT BY HUNTERS

Documented: Emotional Stress, Physical Injury, and Property Damage Inflicted Upon Innocent People by Those Who Hunt, Fish, and Trap

SEE ARTICLES


Return to Hunting Accidents and Violations Archive: 2003-2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015

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