One By One, the Flood Gates of Antarctica are Breaking Open

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“We have still time to avoid the worst of it, but we have already opened a number of flood gates, one in West Antarctica, and several in Greenland.”Dr Eric Rignot.

“This kind of rifting behavior provides another mechanism for rapid retreat of these glaciers, adding to the probability that we may see significant collapse of West Antarctica in our lifetimes.” Ian Howat, Earth Sciences associate Professor at Ohio State University.

“Burning all the world’s coal, oil and gas would melt the entire Antarctic ice-sheet and cause the oceans to rise by over 50m, a transformation unprecedented in human history. The conclusion of a new scientific study shows that, over the course of centuries, land currently inhabited by a billion people would be lost below water.” — The Guardian.

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Massive Rift Forming in Larsen C

Larsen C. It’s the next big ice shelf on the…

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Man dies in apparent fall from tree stand while hunting in Grundy County

http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/local/story/2016/dec/06/mdies-tree-stand-fall-while-hunting-grundy/401452/

A Tracy City, Tenn., man died Saturday in an apparent fall from a tree stand while hunting near his home.

Family members found Michael “Moty” Nunley dead at the bottom of his tree stand about midday Saturday after he failed to come home, Grundy County Sheriff Clint Shrum said Monday. The fall happened near Clouse Hill Road, northwest of Tracy City.

Nunley was an avid hunter, said Shrum, who knew him personally. Nunley was the father of two children and worked for the Tennessee Department of Transportation, the sheriff said.

“Everybody knew him as ‘Moty.’ He was from a good family,” Shrum said. “It was just a tragic accident.”

Shrum said it appeared the fall happened when Nunley was finished hunting for the day. Nunley had driven his four-wheeler to the tree stand, which was older and consisted of a ladder and platform, Shrum said.

“He had already lowered his weapon to the ground. It appears that he fell out of the stand trying to come down the stand,” the sheriff said.

Family members knew something was wrong when Nunley didn’t return from the woods to eat breakfast with his mother, his routine during hunting season, Shrum said.

“He lost his footing or his hold and landed on his back,” Shrum said. Nunley landed on his gun when he hit the ground, but it didn’t discharge.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency officials said there have been two tree stand accidents this season in the agency’s Region 3, which comprises most of the counties in Southeast Tennessee.

The other accident happened around Nov. 20 in Sequatchie County.

Cleveland, Tenn., resident Steve Wilson, 44, was found dead at the bottom of his tree stand on a remote tract of property on Lewis Chapel Mountain, said Sequatchie County Sheriff Ronnie Hitchcock. Wilson had been hunting on private property that was being leased for hunting and had “signed in” on a specific tract, which gave emergency crews a good idea where to look. Authorities said they believed Wilson to be an experienced hunter.

TWRA spokeswoman Mime Barnes said it’s important that hunters take all recommended precautions when using tree stands.

“The No. 1 thing hunters can do to be safe in tree stands is wear a safety harness,” Barnes said. “They should also follow the safety instructions for their particular brand of tree stand and let someone know their plans for their hunt.”

Hunting season is still open, so it’s important for hunters to remain vigilant about safety, Barnes said.

Deer hunting gun season — as well as archery and muzzle-loader seasons — are open now until Jan. 8, she said.

Hunter finds friendly deer wearing orange scarf for hunting

http://www.wilx.com/content/news/Hunter-finds-deer-wearing-404747255.html

On the day after Thanksgiving, Brian Powers grabbed his rifle and headed for some land east of Wausau. If not for his cell phone, Powers doubts anyone would believe what happened next. “All of a sudden here comes a deer and he has an orange scarf on. And he just kept walking and I said ‘oh my, he must be somebody’s pet or being fed by someone or being taken care of by somebody.” The color orange is commonly used to alert hunters not to shoot.

It wouldn’t be long before powers discovered he had a new friend. “Right when he got parallel on the logging road to where I was off the road, he stopped and turned and looked right at me and I said, ‘wow this is unbelievable,’ so then I called him over and he walked right in.”

With one hand filming the unlikely encounter, Powers gave the young buck a head rub. After about 10 minutes, the deer wandered off, but that afternoon as Powers was walking out of the woods, he returned, just in time to receive some friendly advice. “Keep your head low man, make sure people see that orange alright,” Powers said to the deer in his video recording. Since posting his video on Youtube, Powers story has spread all over the country.

17-year-old accidentally kills friend he mistook for deer during hunting trip

CHARLOTTE COUNTY, Va. (WSET) – A 16-year-old boy was shot and killed by a friend in a hunting accident late Friday afternoon, according to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF).

The game commission says the incident happened on private property on Mt. Carmel Road in Charlotte County around 5:20 p.m.

VDGIF says a 17-year-old boy was hunting and mistook his 16-year-old friend, who was hunting with him, for a deer. The 16-year-old died at the scene.

The Va. Dept. of Game & Inland Fisheries says the teen was mistaken for a deer. http://spr.ly/60128J0RQ 

Photo published for 16-year-old dead after hunting accident in Charlotte Co.

16-year-old dead after hunting accident in Charlotte Co.

CHARLOTTE Co., Va. (WSET) — A 16-year-old male was accidentally shot and killed in a hunting accident Friday night, according to the Va. Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF).The Game…

The victim, according to VDGIF, was standing in an “agricultural field” and was shot from about 150 to 200 yards away.

The hunters were both wearing blaze orange gear, had taken hunter education, and had the appropriate hunting licenses, according to VDGIF.

Because the teens are minors, their names will not be released. The 17-year-old is from Cullen, Virginia, while the 16-year-old was from Phenix, Virginia.

The victim’s body was transported to the medical examiner’s office in Richmond. The incident remains under investigation by VDGIF.

Trump Meets With Al Gore on Climate Change

UPDATED 12:41 PM

President-elect Donald J. Trump and his daughter Ivanka met with former Vice President Al Gore on Monday to discuss human-caused climate change.

A meeting on climate change.

Continue reading the main story

Photo

Al Gore, the former vice president, arrived at Trump Tower in Manhattan on Monday.CreditHilary Swift for The New York Times

Al Gore thought he would be bending the ear of the adviser Mr. Trump trusts most, his daughter Ivanka.

Instead, the man bearing “The Inconvenient Truth” went straight to the source: the president-elect himself.

“I had a lengthy and very productive session with the president-elect,” Mr. Gore, the former vice president, told reporters at Trump Tower. “It was a sincere search for areas of common ground. I had a meeting beforehand with Ivanka Trump. The bulk of the time was with the president-elect, Donald Trump. I found it an extremely interesting conversation, and to be continued.”

Full Story: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/05/us/politics/donald-trump-transition.html?_r=0

Cat alerts Tennessee man to Gatlinburg fires

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2016/12/05/gatlinburg-fires-cat-alerts-man/94983594/

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — A Tennessee man who owns a store in Gatlinburg is so naturally laid back, the first word that wildfires were near the communitydidn’t unnerve him.

Mark Burger, 60, figured his cellphone would get an evacuation alert if the situation became dangerous, he said.

After inquiries, officials have since said no evacuation alert was sent to mobile devices.

Tennessee’s monthslong drought and wildfire emergency culminated Nov. 28 when hurricane-force winds sent unpredictable fires racing through the Gatlinburg area.

On Nov. 28, Burger was relaxing in his mountainside Gatlinburg condo with Tiger, his Siamese cat, for company. Burger’s son, Tanner, found Tiger as a kitten abandoned. Tanner rescued Tiger and gave him to Burger as a gift.

Now, it seems Tiger has repaid Burger for his life.

More: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2016/12/05/gatlinburg-fires-cat-alerts-man/94983594/

Bipedal Bear’s Apparent Death Motivates Bear Hunt Opponents in New Jersey

 

New Jersey’s long-debated black bear hunts have stoked strong passions, blasted by animal rights activists as inhumane and supported by hunters and wildlife officials who say they help control the population and minimize run-ins with humans.

But the death of a bear presumed to be one that walked on two feet and became a social media darling has become a rallying cry for hunt opponents as they prepare to stage protests during the second segment of this year’s hunt, which starts Monday. It’s scheduled to run through Saturday, but officials said it could end early depending on how many bears are culled.

Pedals the bear first surfaced about two years ago in Jefferson Township. The bear walked with an unusual gait on his hind legs and was spotted ambling around neighborhoods. It also was caught on videos that were posted online and shown on national television.

Wildlife officials believe Pedals was killed during the expanded bear hunt staged in October. The Department of Environmental Protection released pictures showing the lifeless body of a black bear with injured paws, just like the ones Pedals had, but couldn’t confirm the identity because Pedals was never tagged.

Animal rights activists say the belief that Pedals is dead has motivated them and others to work even harder to end the hunt. Pedals was last seen on video in June.

“Our numbers have always been high, but the killing of Pedals has caused our support to increase,” said Janine Motta, programs director for the Bear Education And Resource program. The group has staged protests during previous hunts in New Jersey and plans similar events during the upcoming hunt.

“Here was one particular bear that people may have known, seen or just followed on Facebook. They felt a connection with Pedals,” Motta said. “When he was killed, it became personal for those who loved him, and that translated into a greater awareness of the hunt in general and the realization that all bears who are killed are important.”

New Jersey resumed state-regulated bear hunting in 2003 after a ban that lasted more than 30 years. Another hunt was held in 2005, and in 2010 the state instituted an annual hunt.

The expanded six-day hunting season took effect this year. Hunters were allowed to use only bows and arrows to during the first three days, and muzzle-loading guns were added during the second half.

This coming week’s hunt is for firearms only and runs concurrently with the six-day firearm season for deer. But wildlife officials anticipate the bear hunt will end early due to the harvest limit set in the state’s bear management policy.

Hunters harvested 562 bears during the expanded hunt, and 23.4 percent were previously tagged bears. This week’s hunt will be suspended once the cumulative harvest rate of tagged bears reaches 30 percent, officials said.

State wildlife officials have touted the annual hunt as an important part of controlling the bear population and minimizing run-ins with humans, particularly in the northern part of New Jersey known as bear country. They have estimated that 3,500 bears live in New Jersey north of Interstate 80, roughly the upper one-eighth of the state.

Critics have called the hunt brutal, cruel and ineffective. But James Doherty, a Toms River resident who has taken part in previous hunts, believes the critics are so focused on their cause that they don’t see why it’s needed.

“The stereotype of hunters is that we’re all gun nuts who like to kill things for the fun of it, but that’s not the case,” Doherty said. “Listen to the biologists, the experts- the hunt helps keep the bear population in control, and that’s very important. If the population gets too high, there’s not enough food for all of them, and it can lead to more bear-human interactions.”

Read more: http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/Bipedal-Bears-Apparent-Death-Motivated-Bear-Hunt-Opponents-in-New-Jersey-404604286.html#ixzz4Rzv3aTQ6
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Wolves are coming; Regional meeting held in Quincy to alert ranchers

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Trapping, hunting, mice and the Lyme disease epidemic

Wisconsin Wildlife Ethic-Vote Our Wildlife

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COURTESY OF BING IMAGES

Possums, like these babies shown above, have been called the unsung heros in the Lyme disease epidemic

“In staggering numbers, opossums  up removing or eating as much as 96 percent of all ticks that land on them. … Possums are the unsung heroes in the Lyme disease epidemic.“ ~ Rick Ostfeld, Cary Institute

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has invested great effort in recruiting and training thousands of new trappers and hunters with $5 license incentives. They’re destroying Wisconsin’s indigenous species like beavers, muskrat, foxes, bobcats, otters, coyotes, raccoons and opossums.

We never seem to learn from history. Market trapping and hunting back in the 1850s, when wildlife was abundant and humans much less so, almost destroyed wildlife even then.

Coyotes, wolves, foxes, bobcats and opossums are exactly the species that control rodents and buffer humans from zoonotic diseases. Diseases that are transmitted by animals…

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