Dog caught in coyote traps gnaws off leg to free herself

https://www.kiro7.com/news/trending/dog-caught-coyote-traps-gnaws-off-leg-free-herself/BONMSBZRANBWDGFEJ5G7BAGMHU/

April 19, 2021 at 1:37 pm PDTBy Jared Leone, Cox Media Group National Content Desk

SAN ANTONIO — A dog that had gotten caught in an animal trap and gnawed off its leg to free herself is now recovering after being adopted.

>> Read more trending news

Shelby, a 1-year-old shepherd mix, was brought into the San Antonio Humane Society covered in cuts to her body and missing a leg, WOAI reported.

A good Samaritan saw the dog March 19 with the trap attached to her leg. The man tried to help her but she ran off. Three days later the man again saw Shelby, only by now she had gnawed off her leg to free it from the trap.

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Her legs were swollen and the wounds were infected when she was brought into the animal shelter. Veterinarians quickly got to work. They performed multiple surgeries, a full body radiograph to see if there were any other fractures and used laser therapy to accelerate Shelby’s healing.

“Eventually, she warmed up enough to give us a tail wag and kisses,” Dr. Kristine Hawkins told WOAI. “Just this past weekend, we convinced her to venture outside. Now, she is absolutely thriving. She loves to run around outside and play.”

Shelby is doing physical therapy daily as part of her recovery and was adopted Monday, the shelter said.

“Shelby would love a home with a doggy playmate – someone her size or smaller who wouldn’t be rough on her,” Hawkins said. “She seems to be very loving and generous with kisses and is eager to receive tons of belly rubs. She would love a family who appreciates all that she has been through.”https://www.facebook.com/v10.0/plugins/post.php?app_id=&channel=https%3A%2F%2Fstaticxx.facebook.com%2Fx%2Fconnect%2Fxd_arbiter%2F%3Fversion%3D46%23cb%3Dfebf3578ca695%26domain%3Dwww.kiro7.com%26origin%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fwww.kiro7.com%252Ff1ef42f1c50bc9%26relation%3Dparent.parent&container_width=552&href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fsahumane%2Fposts%2F10158285519426447%26locale%3Den_US&locale=en_US&sdk=joey&width=552Forecast from MeteorologistNick Allard

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Dog caught in coyote traps gnaws off leg to free herself

April 19, 2021 at 1:37 pm PDTBy Jared Leone, Cox Media Group National Content Desk

SAN ANTONIO — A dog that had gotten caught in an animal trap and gnawed off its leg to free herself is now recovering after being adopted.

>> Read more trending news

Shelby, a 1-year-old shepherd mix, was brought into the San Antonio Humane Society covered in cuts to her body and missing a leg, WOAI reported.

A good Samaritan saw the dog March 19 with the trap attached to her leg. The man tried to help her but she ran off. Three days later the man again saw Shelby, only by now she had gnawed off her leg to free it from the trap.

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Her legs were swollen and the wounds were infected when she was brought into the animal shelter. Veterinarians quickly got to work. They performed multiple surgeries, a full body radiograph to see if there were any other fractures and used laser therapy to accelerate Shelby’s healing.

“Eventually, she warmed up enough to give us a tail wag and kisses,” Dr. Kristine Hawkins told WOAI. “Just this past weekend, we convinced her to venture outside. Now, she is absolutely thriving. She loves to run around outside and play.”

Shelby is doing physical therapy daily as part of her recovery and was adopted Monday, the shelter said.

“Shelby would love a home with a doggy playmate – someone her size or smaller who wouldn’t be rough on her,” Hawkins said. “She seems to be very loving and generous with kisses and is eager to receive tons of belly rubs. She would love a family who appreciates all that she has been through.”https://www.facebook.com/v10.0/plugins/post.php?app_id=&channel=https%3A%2F%2Fstaticxx.facebook.com%2Fx%2Fconnect%2Fxd_arbiter%2F%3Fversion%3D46%23cb%3Dfebf3578ca695%26domain%3Dwww.kiro7.com%26origin%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fwww.kiro7.com%252Ff1ef42f1c50bc9%26relation%3Dparent.parent&container_width=552&href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fsahumane%2Fposts%2F10158285519426447%26locale%3Den_US&locale=en_US&sdk=joey&width=552Forecast from MeteorologistNick Allard

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Mississauga Animal Services on what to do if you spot a coyote or den

https://www.mississauga.com/news-story/10362867-list-mississauga-animal-services-on-what-to-do-if-you-spot-a-coyote-or-den/

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NEWS

LIST:

Coyote pup denning season starts in March and April

Sabrina GamrotMississauga NewsTuesday, March 30, 2021

Spring is officially upon us and, as a result, wildlife will start to appear more often.

Coyotes start denning to raise their pups in March and April, which may result in increased sights and activity.

Dens for coyotes and pups can be created in many areas including the side of hills, tree stumps, underneath patios or decks and in culverts around natural areas or hydro corridors, according to the city of Mississauga.

Coyotes will instinctively protect their young and will vocalize, growl or act in a defensive manner toward any predators or people.

Mississauga Animal Services is sharing a number of tips to use if you encounter a den or see a coyote.

Coyotes help to control rodent and rabbit populations and are an important aspect of our ecosystem, said the city.

IF YOU SUSPECT A DEN IS NEARBY:

• Avoid the area

•. Keep dogs on a leash not longer than six feet

• Don’t dump food or garbage outside, which could attract wildlife

Related content

MAP: List of coyote sightings in Mississauga

• Call Animal Services if dens pose a public risk 

IF YOU ENCOUNTER A COYOTE:https://4c624841fc305c1cfa32d1c375cd5dc4.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

• Stay calm and wait until it leaves

• Do not turn your back and run, the coyote may chase you

• Look big by waving your arms, clap, yell or make startling movements and stand tall

• Startle the coyote by opening an umbrella, using a flashlight or alarm

• If you are in immediate danger, call 911.

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR PETS: 

• Supervise your pets when outside in the yard

• When seeing a coyote, pick up your dog if possible

• Keep dogs on a leash

• Keep cats indoors as much as possible

Coyote sightings can be submitted online to the city’s interactive map, which tracks all sightings.

For more information, residents can call Animal Services at 905-896-5858 or visit Mississauga.ca/coyotes.

Fox, coyote and turkey hunting proposed at Potomac River wildlife refuges

https://www.insidenova.com/headlines/fox-coyote-and-turkey-hunting-proposed-at-potomac-river-wildlife-refuges/article_57ff51ca-9eba-11eb-b5cd-abf68e4e6af6.html?fbclid=IwAR1NRtmWtZvK1X6CyooXBEb5M6aj__TrqEqzMKLwMd92flK4ucTLf-DGeq8

  • Apr 16, 2021 Updated Apr 16, 2021
Occoquan Bay NWR
The scene from a wildlife viewing platform at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Woodbridge.By Casey Pugh

U.S. Fish and Wildlife is seeking public comment on new plans for fox, coyote, waterfowl and turkey hunting, along with expanded deer hunting and fishing opportunities, at the Potomac River National Wildlife Refuge Complex in Woodbridge and southern Fairfax.Trending on InsideNoVa https://c5x8i7c7.ssl.hwcdn.net/vplayer-parallel/20210408_1900/ima_html5/index.htmlhttps://c5x8i7c7.ssl.hwcdn.net/vplayer-parallel/20210408_1900/videojs/show.html?controls=1&loop=30&autoplay=0&tracker=a400ac00-21b7-4967-adeb-951c15739530&height=352&width=625&vurl=%2F%2Fd14c63magvk61v.cloudfront.net%2Fvideos%2Fdgv_insidenova%2F20210418054149_607bc4b07dee4%2Fdgv_insidenova_trending_articles_20210418054149_607bc4b07dee4_new.mp4&poster=%2F%2Fd14c63magvk61v.cloudfront.net%2Fvideos%2Fdgv_insidenova%2F20210418054149_607bc4b07dee4%2Fdgv_insidenova_trending_articles_20210418054149_607bc4b07dee4_new.jpgXPowered By 

The complex includes the Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck, Occoquan Bay, and Featherstone National Wildlife Refuges. The USFW is inviting the public to review and comment on the draft plan for proposed hunts and fishing access.

The proposed plan includes:

  • Open fishing opportunities on non-motorized watercraft in designated areas of Occoquan Bay NWR, Mason Neck NWR and Featherstone NWR. Additionally, Featherstone NWR will also open fishing opportunities to motorized watercraft in designated areas.
  • Expanded deer hunting hours at Occoquan Bay NWR.
  • Open opportunities for mentored turkey hunting and mentored archery deer hunting on Occoquan Bay NWR.
  • Open fox and coyote hunting opportunities in conjunction with permitted deer hunt days at Occoquan Bay NWR.
  • Open waterfowl hunting opportunities in designated areas of Featherstone NWR.

A “hunt application/permit” (FWS Form 3-2439) will be required for hunting deer on E.H. Mason Neck NWR and Occoquan Bay NWR. No more than $10 application fee and $20 permit fee for deer and turkey hunts would be established to defray the costs of operation.

Deer hunt permit applications would most likely be administered by a contracted company that will feature online, mail, and telephone services to collect hunter information, required fees, and issue permits, the release said.

Draft documents for review are available here.

You can contact the refuge at 703-490-4979 to request more information. Submit your comments to the refuge by mail at 12638 Darby Brooke Court, Woodbridge, VA 22192 or by email at HuntFishRuleComments@fws.gov with the subject line of “Potomac River NWR Complex.”

The comment period will be open through the end of the 2021-2022 federal hunting and sport fishing regulations open comment period to be announced in the Federal Register, USFW said in a news release. Federal officials expect the comment period to be open through mid-June. 

“Across the country, national wildlife refuges work closely with state agencies, tribes, and private partners to expand recreational hunting and fishing access,” the release said. “Hunting and fishing provide opportunities for communities, families, and individuals to enjoy the outdoors, support conservation efforts, and participate in a popular American tradition.”

PETA Protests Canada Goose at Flagship Store and Saks Fifth Avenue in NYC

MARCH 10, 2021 BY DONNY MOSS — https://theirturn.net/2021/03/10/peta-protests-canada-goose-at-its-nyc-flagship-store-and-at-saks-fifth-avenue/

The News

As part of a “Week of Action” targeting Canada Goose over its use of coyote fur and goose feathers, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) staged protests at the company’s flagship store in Soho and at the department store Saks Fifth Avenue, which sells Canada Goose apparel.https://www.youtube.com/embed/ywdwdd6JEso?feature=oembed

In a statement to the media, PETA wrote, “Cruelty can be found in every stitch of Canada Goose’s jackets and other clothing items. Coyotes used for the company’s fur trim can suffer in painful steel traps indefinitely before they’re killed. Mothers desperate to get back to their pups have attempted to chew off their own limbs to escape. Ducks and geese suffer for down as well—no matter their origin. Birds used for their down are inevitably sent to the slaughterhouse, where standard practice is to hang them upside down, stun them, and then slit their throats.”

Canada Goose traps and kills coyotes for their fur and plucks and slaughters geese for their feathers.

On April 22, 2020, the New York Times reported that Canada Goose would stop buying fur from trappers starting in 2022. It would instead use reclaimed fur, which the company describes as fur that “already exists in its supply chain and the marketplace.”  As part of its plan, Canada Goose said it would buy back the fur trim from its customers’ coats and recycle it.  In a public statement, the company said that its decision was made to reduce the company’s carbon footprint, not in response to the demands of PETA and other animal rights groups.

In April 2020, the New York Times reported that Canada Goose would stop selling “new” fur in 2020.

The announcement, which was met with skepticism and confusion by the animal rights community, did not stop the protests at Canada Goose. After the initial pandemic lockdown in NYC, grass roots animal rights groups resumed protesting at the store.  In October 2020, the Coaltion to Abolish the Fur Trade (CAFT) began protesting at Saks Fifth Avenue over its refusal to stop selling Canada Goose and other other fashion labels that use real animal fur.

Animal rights activists with PETA protest at the Canada Goose store in NYC

“Hundreds of major retailers, including Paragon Sports and KITH in NYC,  have announced that they would stop selling fur,” said Rachel Levy, an organizer of the Week of Action Protests. “Canada Goose, however, has stated that it will continue to sell it. In 2021, when so many fashionable, functional alternatives exist, no clothing manufacturer should be using real fur.”

Animal rights activists with PETA and the Coalition to Abolish the Fur Trade (CAFT) stage an anti-fur protest at Saks Fifth Avenue

PETA stops traffic in front of Saks Fifth Ave. as part of an anti-fur protest targeting the store.

The Undeniable Value of Wolves, Bears, Lions And Coyotes In Battling Disease

WILL THE FAIRY TALE MENTALITY OF WESTERN STATES AGAINST PREDATORS HAMPER THEIR ABILITY TO SLOW CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE?

by Todd WilkinsonSUPPORT USGET NEWSLETTERPhoto courtesy NPS / Jacob W. FrankPART FOUR
For over two decades, Douglas Smith and successive teams of researchers have watched wildlife predators hunting for prey in Yellowstone.
The national park’s senior wolf biologist says there is no mistaking the way that lobos identify and target elk. To the human eye, an individual wapiti might appear perfectly healthy yet there is something—almost a sixth sense— that catches the attention of discriminating pack members searching for their next meal.
It might be an elk with arthritis carrying a slight gimp in its gait, or maybe a hint of winter-worn fatigue, a slowness brought on by advancing old age or illness, or perhaps naïve behavior exhibited by the young.
There is no doubt, based on the accrued record of wolf behavior documented in Yellowstone—and the significant body of scientific accounts logged across the continent—that under normal conditions, wolves key-in on prey that is meek, infirmed or vulnerable.
“Wolves pick up on stuff we can’t see. They are most efficient at exploiting weaknesses in prey because their survival depends on it,” Smith told me recently. “They are predisposed, by instinct and learned behavior, to focus first on animals that are easier to kill rather than those living at the height of their physical strength.”
Does having predators on the landscape—wolves, bears, mountain lions and coyotes— provide a protective gauntlet that can help slow the spread and prevalence of deadly diseases?
In particular, with ultra-lethal Chronic Wasting Disease now invading the most wildlife-rich ecosystem in America’s Lower 48 states and spreading coast to coast, are these often maligned meat-eaters, frequently dismissed as worthless vermin in western states, actually important natural allies in battling CWD?

“Wolves pick up on stuff we can’t see. They are most efficient at exploiting weaknesses in prey because their survival depends on it. They are predisposed, by instinct and learned behavior, to focus first on animals that are easier to kill rather than those living at the height of their physical strength.” —Yellowstone’s chief wolf biologist Douglas Smith

While the data and the assessments of most scientists clearly suggests yes, there remains fierce resistance by some to acknowledge the beneficial roles predators play.  At the recent year-end meeting of the Montana Fish and Game Commission, anti-predator biases were on full display, especially toward wolves. They surfaced as the commission pondered its next move in confronting CWD which this autumn entered Montana via sick wild deer for the first time in state history.
Weeks earlier, Ken McDonald, wildlife bureau chief at the Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks Department, raised eyebrows when he claimed the advantages predators bring in weeding out sick prey is merely theoretical and unproved. Dismissing the notion of wolves as effective disease-fighters, he asserted that in order for lobos to truly make a difference in slowing CWD’s advance, they would need to exist in such high numbers that it would be socially unacceptable to humans, namely ranchers and hunters.
In terms of Montana’s strategy for dealing with CWD spread in the state through sick wildlife entering via Wyoming from the south and Canada to the north, McDonald said the state’s primary method of confronting disease will involve enlisting hunters to aggressively harvest animals in emerging CWD endemic zones. The state recently approved the issuance of 1,200 additional B tags to kill deer in areas east of Red Lodge, Montana (the northeast corner of Greater Yellowstone) where six dead deer have turned up CWD positive out of 1300 tested there—four mule deer bucks, a mule deer doe and a white-tailed doe.
Many claim McDonald’s characterization of wolves demonstrates not only a personal anti-wolf bias, which also permeates the thinking of the department, but it shows a lack of understanding and appreciation for the natural history of the species. In other words, it denies what the very essence of a wolf is.
“I was disappointed with Ken McDonald’s nonsensical bureaucratic response,” conservationist and professional biologist Dr. Gary J. Wolfe wrote recently in comments that were widely circulated.
Wolfe is a former Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks Commissioner appointed by Gov. Steve Bullock. Notably, he is also the former project leader of the CWD Alliance founded by a number of prominent sportsmen’s’ groups and former national president and CEO of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation for 15 years. He is widely respected in hunting circles.
 “While I don’t think any of us large carnivore proponents are saying that wolf predation will prevent CWD, or totally eliminate it from infected herds, it is ecologically irresponsible to not consider the very real possibility that wolves can slow the spread of CWD and reduce its prevalence in infected herds,” Wolfe says. “We should consider wolves to be ‘CWD border guards,’ adjust wolf hunting seasons accordingly, and let wolves do their job of helping to cull infirm animals from the herds.”

“While I don’t think any of us large carnivore proponents are saying that wolf predation will prevent CWD, or totally eliminate it from infected herds, it is ecologically irresponsible to not consider the very real possibility that wolves can slow the spread of CWD and reduce its prevalence in infected herds.  We should consider wolves to be ‘CWD border guards,’ adjust wolf hunting seasons accordingly, and let wolves do their job of helping to cull infirm animals from the herds.”  —biologist Gary Wolfe, former Montana wildlife commissioner and former CEO/president of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

Strong evidence seems to bear him out. Not only do predators stalking large game species target weak animals, they can mitigate the impact of disease outbreaks, experts say. Further, by removing sick prey species, predators could, over time, though this is unproved, make herds more resilient and stronger, less susceptible to disease.
While some may doubt this premise, illustrated in literature below, no one has provided evidence suggesting that having robust and stable numbers of predators will not aid in confronting the most rapidly spreading and fearsome new disease in North America.
° ° °
The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is a region unparalleled in the Lower 48 states. It is known globally as America’s Serengeti for having its full original complement of mammal and bird species, including large native predators, that were here when Europeans arrived on the continent in the late 15th century.  Plus, the landscape these animals inhabit, a 22.5-million-acre mixture of private and mostly public land, is intact—meaning not fragmented and enabling migrations of elk, deer and pronghorn (antelope) to occur and which do not exist anywhere else.
Lloyd Dorsey, conservation director for the Sierra Club in Wyoming, is a hunter and crusader against Wyoming’s operation of elk feedgrounds. This autumn when we spoke about predators and CWD, he had just returned from hunting in the Gros Ventre mountains east of the National Elk Refuge. He told me of how on the morning that he glassed mule deer and bands of elk, he found grizzly tracks in the snow and heard wolves howling a quarter mile away.
Citing reams of scientific studies to back him up, Dorsey says predators play an import ecological role in keeping prey species in check and in serving as vanguards in removing sick animals. Greater Yellowstone’s “predator guild” of wolves, grizzly and black bears, lions and coyotes, he notes, also makes it a draw for wildlife watchers from around the world, helping to fuel a $1-billion annual nature-tourism economy tied to the national parks alone. 
A disease like CWD that stands to significantly harm the health of deer family members over time—deer, elk, and moose—also has potentially grave implications for species that eat and scavenge their remains. In many ways, the biological integrity of Greater Yellowstone’s large mammal populations depends upon the health of its ungulate herds and the biomass they provide in sustaining other species large and small—those with fur and feathers down to the microbial level.  Diseases that threaten to dramatically diminish Greater Yellowstone’s ungulates could have negative, far-reaching consequences for people and the environment.
To date, there is no evidence that CWD can infect predators, humans or livestock, though geneticists who have studied the molecular make-up of CWD prions [misshapen proteins] believe it could change. And a recent study in Canada involving macaques exposed to CWD prions has elevated concerns. Macaques are primates with genes similar to humans.
With CWD, Wyoming is perilously burning the candle at both ends and it has implications for Montana and Idaho, Dorsey says. Wyoming and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service continue to knowingly operate feedgrounds [read parts OneTwo and Three of MoJo’s series here] which makes the state and federal government guilty of game management malpractice by setting up public wildlife for calamity, he says. 
At the same time, Wyoming persists in destroying a natural ally—wolves—based upon no solid reason other than traditional cultural animosity toward these archetypal animals that earlier generations of settlers took great delight in eradicating to make way for livestock.
“Our understanding of wolves has broadened in an age of greater scientific and ecological awareness,” Dorsey told me. “They are not the animals of menacing myth they were portrayed to be in fairy tales.  We can—and should—co-exist with them for mutual benefit.”
Nonetheless, Wyoming—along with Alaska—is known for having the most notoriously-hostile attitude toward wolves in America. There, in over 85 percent of the state, lobos, like coyotes, can be killed year-round for any reason, no questions asked. Only in the northwest corner of Wyoming within the vicinity of Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks are wolves classified as a game animal and even there it is state policy to keep their numbers suppressed to please outfitters, guides and ranchers.
Beyond that small zone, they are classified as “predators” and treated as vermin. They can be trapped, poisoned, shot at any and all hours of the day, and targeted by aerial gunners in aircraft. Even if they are not threatening livestock, it’s open season on wolves.
The profound irony is that just as Wyoming condones a campaign of re-eradication against wolves, CWD has been rapidly spreading westward, faster than anyone expected across the state via infected mule and white-tailed deer.Perfect conditions to amplify a CWD pandemic, experts say, exist on the National Elk Refuge and 22 elk feedgrounds operated by the state of Wyoming, many of them on U.S. Forest Service land.
CWD’s arrival is considered imminent. When the disease lands in the Wyoming feedgrounds, where more than 20,000 elk are unnaturally concentrated during winters, CWD is expected to not only take hold but have its spread accelerated due to the widely-condemned management practice of bunching up wapiti. The conditions there are similar to game farms where CWD infections have been devastating.
This point was made in a letter sent December 7, 2017 from the Montana state wildlife commission (read it at bottom of this story] to counterparts in Wyoming, asking the state to take steps to shut down feeding.
“We respect the fact that how Wyoming manages its affairs is up to Wyoming. However, Montana’s ability to combat CWD will depend upon decisions that Wyoming makes about its wildlife management.  Over the long-term, the feed grounds make your wildlife populations less healthy, less stable, and much more vulnerable to a catastrophic disease event,” the Montana Fish and Wildlife Commission wrote.  “We implore you to begin the process of looking at alternatives to the present management regime that unnaturally concentrates wildlife in feed grounds each winter and increases the pace at which CWD infects both states’ wildlife populations.”
The letter ends with this warning:  “If we do not address CWD, we will all be culpable in leaving a greatly devalued landscape to future generations.”  Culpable is a word with many connotations.

While Montana has escaped the intense scrutiny and public rebuke aimed at Wyoming over its operation of feedgrounds and controversial management of wolves, Wolfe and others say Montana isn’t much better with regard to predators.
Recently, another case of CWD was confirmed in a deer near Chester along Montana’s Hi-Line south of Canada.

Currently, only three wolf management units in Montana have strict quotas (two located north of Yellowstone and one west of Glacier National Park). But all others allow unlimited wolf harvest “which is probably not the best ecological strategy for containing CWD,” Wolfe noted. “As a wildlife biologist who spent several years working on the CWD issue, I believe wolf predation is an important tool that needs to be recognized and effectively utilized, along with other tools, as part of Montana’s CWD management plan.”
Wolves, Wolfe says, ought to have their numbers safeguarded in areas that represent the front line of disease. Stable packs can serve as a barrier.  Wolf management units (WMUs) that border CWD infected areas (or have CWD infected herds within the WMU) should have conservative wolf harvest quotas, he notes. Currently, only three WMUs have quotas (313 and 316 immediately north of Yellowstone, and 110 west of Glacier).  All others allow unlimited wolf harvest.
When the argument has been presented to the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, it has been met with deaf ears, though Dr. Mary Wood, the state wildlife veterinarian noted in 2016 that predators can play a beneficial role.
° ° °
Humans can invent any fairy-tale-reason they want to despise wolves and justify their elimination, but that doesn’t change the fundamental time-tested nature of the species, says Kevin Van Tighem, a hunter and former superintendent of Banff National Park in Alberta’s Canadian Rockies.  “I don’t know of a single credible biologist who would argue that wolves, along with other predators and scavengers, aren’t important tools in devising sound strategies for dealing with CWD.” Van Tighem says it can be rationally argued that wolves provide the best line of defense since they are confronting infected animals.
Van Tighem told me, just as a dozen other scientists and land managers who hunt have—that once CWD is confirmed in the places where they go afield, they will no longer eat game meat from that area and may stop hunting altogether.
Dr. L. David Mech, the eminent American wolf biologist, has authored or contributed to hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific papers on wolves and prey. We’ve been talking about wolves since the late 1980s when he came to Yellowstone in the years before lobos were reintroduced. There’s no tangible argument he’s seen that suggests wolves wouldn’t be useful in combatting CWD.
“In the main, the preponderance of scientific evidence supports the view that wolves generally kill the old, the young, the sick and the weak,” Mech said. “There’s so much documented field data behind it.” 
He then made a point that exposes the limitations of relying on human hunters and sharpshooters alone to remove suspected CWD carriers.  Wolves appear to target sick animals that, to the human eye, exhibit no overt symptoms of disease.
“There’s a lot more going on than we can detect,” Mech said. “They are killing animals that most people would say, ‘That animal looks pretty healthy to me,’ but in fact it isn’t.”  Mech stays out of the political fray, though he says the value of predators is clear.  “Based upon everything I’ve seen over the course of my career, I generally stand behind the assertion that wolves make prey populations healthier,” he said. “The evidence to support it is overwhelming.”
In Wolves on the Hunt: The Behavior of Wolves Hunting Wild Prey, Mech, Doug Smith and co-author/editor Daniel R. MacNulty undertook an exhaustive, unprecedented review of scientific studies and observations related to wolf behavior. They cite example after example of how wolves choose prey.  They use intricately-detailed observations based on the work of park ecologist Rick McIntyre and colleagues who have tracked the wolves of Yellowstone’s Lamar Valley for decades. They also point to hours upon hours of accumulated video footage amassed by award-winning wildlife cinematographer Robert Landis who has recorded numerous wolf predation incidents in Yellowstone. 

More: https://mountainjournal.org/predators-and-chronic-wasting-disease?fbclid=IwAR3n6_aqsslqwo_uNx8wVOYnwphj6i6ycMBMYXRlK_pKxWkFj-7Wza7hYD4

Conservation agent shares notes on coyote hunting season

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Conservation agent shares notes on coyote hunting season
Coyotes have always been a predator on the landscape which either generates curiosity from individuals intrigued by their mournful cries and yips in the the night, or the aggravated farmer having to deal with the loss of livestock due to coyote predation.MDC

Sarah Ettinger-Dietzel Iron County Agent Missouri Department of Conservation

The temperate days of fall have left, and the cold winter season is in full swing in Missouri. With the end of another successful Missouri deer season, many hunters change their focus from large game to the small game variety. One such critter is the coyote.

Coyotes have always been a predator on the landscape which either generates curiosity from individuals intrigued by their mournful cries and yips in the the night, or the aggravated farmer having to deal with the loss of livestock due to coyote predation.

The characteristics of coyotes are very distinctive with the upper parts being a light gray or dull yellow, with their outer hairs tipped black. The backs of the ears are often a reddish to yellowish color around the muzzle. The iris of the eye is tawny and both sexes look very much alike.

Coyotes may be taken by hunting, and pelts and carcasses may be possessed, transported, and sold in any numbers throughout the year. Except during the daylight hours from April 1 – 19.

A recent change to occur in coyote hunting regulations occurred in the fall of last year. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) revised regulations regarding coyote hunting. The change came in response to citizen requests to the Regulations Committee to use night vision, infrared, thermal imagery equipment, or artificial light to hunt coyotes and from landowners to allow their authorized representatives to use night vision, infrared, or thermal imagery equipment without prior approval from a conservation agent to address damage caused by feral hogs.Top ArticlesWatch Now: Elephants enjoy the snowfall in Arizona, andmore of today’s top videosWatch Now: Elephants enjoy the snowfall in Arizona, and more of today's top videosREAD MOREChicago bank robber nabbed after allegedly demanding $10,000, handing photo ID to tellerREAD MOREPhotos: Notable Deaths in 2021READ MOREREAD

The regulations allow properly licensed hunters to use artificial light, night vision, infrared, or thermal imagery equipment in conjunction with other legal hunting methods to pursue and take coyotes. A small game hunting permit is required for this season, unless you are a landowner of at least five contiguous acres and hunting are on your property then you are not required to have a small game permit.

This revision became effective Nov. 30. The first inaugural season will begin this coming Feb. 1 and will go through March 31. It should also be noted that property owners and their representatives can still use night vision, infrared, thermal imaging equipment, or artificial light to kill coyotes or other wildlife causing property damage at any time of the year with written authorization from a conservation agent.

The standard regulations still apply during this new season. Hunters may still use electronic calls and dogs in the pursuit of coyotes. Poisons, tranquilizers, chemicals and explosives may not be used. Motor driven transportation cannot be used to take, drive or harass wildlife and you may not take wildlife from or across a public roadway.

As always, we hope that everyone gets the opportunity to get outside and enjoys Missouri’s great outdoors. For more information on nuisance and problem species, contact your local Conservation Agent or visit us at the MDC website at https://short.mdc.mo.gov/Z5L.

FREE WEBINAR on Coexisting with wildlife!

REMINDER ~
December 8 @ 1:00 pm PT ~Dr. Michelle Lute, Project Coyote National Carnivore
Conservation Manager, presents:(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Coexisting
What does it mean to coexist with wildlife? How do we define coexistence and measure it in the real world? Do professionals agree on how, where and when we’re coexisting with some of the most controversial carnivores? What role do animal welfare and rights considerations play in conservation and coexistence? Lastly, what are people doing to implement best coexistence practices on the ground? In this free webinar, wildlife advocate and Project Coyote National Carnivore Conservation Manager Dr. Michelle Lute explores these questions and offers preliminary answers from academic and practical perspectives, rooting discussion in case studies and real-world examples.REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED ~ PLEASE CLICK HERE TO REGISTERDr. Lute is a conservation scientist and advocate with fifteen years’ experience in biodiversity conservation on public and private lands around the globe. She dedicates her professional life to promoting human-wildlife coexistence through effective public engagement, equitable participatory processes, and evidence-based decision-making. Across her career in academic, government, and non-profit sectors, the common thread throughout Michelle’s work is developing solutions to challenging human-wildlife issues. As is often the case, so-called human-wildlife conflicts are more about disagreements between humans and thus solutions require an interdisciplinary approach.Read Michelle’s recent op-eds here:Tell Missouri Department of Conservation not to allow trophy hunting of black bears In the age of extinction, we need wolves Following her talk, Michelle will take questions (via Chat) from attendees. The webinar is expected to last approximately one hour. (The webinar will be recorded and the video will be available on our website soon after the live event.)Details:Date: Tuesday, December 8, 2020Time: 1:00 PM PT / 2:00 PM MT / 4:00 PM ET Registration is required ~ please click here to register.

Canada Goose plans shift to reclaimed fur over wild coyote product

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Luxury parka maker Canada Goose Holdings Inc. plans to start using reclaimed fur for its coats and stop purchasing new fur in a couple years even though some animal rights groups don’t see the reversal as a victory for wildlife.

“We remain committed to the functionality and sustainability of real fur, however we are challenging ourselves to do it better, reusing what already exists,” the company said in its first sustainability report released Wednesday.

For five decades, it has used wild coyote fur from Western Canada and the U.S., that it says its suppliers ensure never comes from fur farms, among other measures.

However, Canada Goose will start making parkas with reclaimed fur in 2022 and stop purchasing new fur that same year in an effort to satisfy consumer demand, the company said.

It notes people living in the North have worked with reclaimed fur for decades and the initiative was inspired by their resourcefulness.

The company also plans to launch a consumer buy-back program for fur in the coming months.

“We believe we must operate sustainably. It’s the right decision for our business, our customers and most importantly, our future,” the report reads, which notes consumers today want more information about fur sustainability and animal welfare, and demand more transparency.

Canada Goose did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Canadian animal rights group Animal Justice called the change “a stunning reversal” prompted by shifting public opinion about fur for fashion, as well as years of advocacy against Canada Goose’s use of fur. It noted California recently banned the sale of new fur.

However, the Canada Goose announcement is still only a “partial victory,” the group said.

“It would be better for the company to abandon fur and down altogether,” noting the switch to reclaimed fur doesn’t help ducks and geese whose feathers are used for down.

The company addresses its use of down in the report, saying it chooses “natural down in jackets because it is the best natural source for warmth per weight ratio.”

Last year, Canada Goose committed to the responsible down standard (RDS) and commits to being certified fully by 2021.

“The RDS aims to ensure that down and feathers come from animals that have not been subjected to unnecessary harm.”

RDS prohibits down or feather removal from live birds and force feeding, according to its website. Its standards also include other measures, including auditing each stage in the supply chain by a professional, third-party certification body.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals called the change to reclaimed fur an attempt to “humane wash” and that “real fur is always cruelly obtained.”

PETA and Animal Justice have fought Canada Goose over its use of animal products.

On Tuesday, an Ontario court dismissed PETA’s application for a judicial review. PETA argued its right to free expression was violated when its anti-Canada Goose ads were taken down in Toronto. Animal Justice intervened in the case and supported PETA’s position.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 22, 2020.

RELATED IMAGES
  • Canada GooseJackets are on display at the Canada Goose Inc. showroom in Toronto on Thursday, November 28, 2013. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim)

Student Activists Raise Awareness About Cruel Canada Goose Practices

The Cornell Vegan Society demonstrated on Ho Plaza to bring awareness to the animal cruelty involved in producing Canada Goose products.

Courtesy of Isabel Lu

The Cornell Vegan Society demonstrated on Ho Plaza to bring awareness to the animal cruelty involved in producing Canada Goose products.

18 hours ago

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On Ho Plaza, Lucy Contreras ’21 defiantly faced the Thursday afternoon passersby with the words “Fur Kills” painted across her abdomen and an apparently blood-drenched Canada Goose jacket wrapped around her body.

The blood was fake, as was the jacket — an imitation with a “Canada Douche” sticker where one would normally find the coat’s iconic sleeve patch.

Contreras, who is a Sun opinion columnist, and her fellow demonstrators aimed to raise awareness about the animal cruelty involved in making the products of the ubiquitous winter-time brand. The coats use goose feathers, most commonly obtained by plucking live geese without any painkillers, and leaving open wounds before they are killed, according to Contreras, president of Cornell Vegan Society and Sun opinion columnist.

The detachable fur trim around the hood of the coat is made of coyote fur, Contreras said. This fur is obtained by capturing wild coyotes in steel traps, where they are often left to agonize for days — suffering from gangrene, dehydration, or attacked by other predators before the trapper returns, according to PETA. If still alive at this point, they are bludgeoned, stomped, or strangled to death, said Contreras.

The demonstrators hoped that those who currently own Canada Goose products never buy from them again and donate the detachable coyote-fur trim of their coats. Several organizations, including PETA and the Wildlife Rescue League, accept donations of furs and redistribute them to rehabilitating animals in shelters or homeless people.

And for those who don’t own Canada Goose products, the demonstrators want them to consider animal cruelty when they buy products such as coats, pillows and comforters.

Chloe Cabrera grad, a participant in the demonstration, called for people to make more responsible consumer choices.

“Each Canada Goose jacket requires seven birds and two coyotes. That’s nine animals dying for virtually no reason, for an overpriced coat that works just as well as any vegan coat,” Cabrera said.

Ultimately, Contreras said, geese and coyotes suffer and die on behalf of the market demand for Canada Goose.

The demonstration was “eye-opening,” Paul Agbaje ’22 said after speaking with a protester.

“No matter how you feel about it, people seem to just mindlessly buy these Canada Goose jackets, without ever considering the ethical implications,” he said.

Other onlookers were less keen, making hostile comments about the demonstration as they walked by.

Contreras is understanding of negative responses like these. “I feel like this shame and this frustration is the beginning of a process of acceptance and of actually taking action against Canada Goose,” she said.

“We’re not blaming them,” Contreras said. “We just want them to know, in the future, to buy jackets that don’t have down or fur.”

Contreras declared the demonstration a success, describing it as one step towards a better public understanding of the relationship between everyday expenditures and animal exploitation.

She encourages friends and peers of Canada Goose wearers to engage them in dialogue. On campus, conversations about ethical consumption are on the rise — Cornell Vegan Society has risen from just a handful of members twoyears ago to about twenty five today, according to Contreras.

She wants them to know that, “with that social status, you are hurting a lot of beings in the process. And it’s not worth it.”

Student Activists Raise Awareness About Cruel Canada Goose Practices

New permit means open season for hunting many furry predators

You can soon hunt raccoons, coyotes, and other furry predators on your private land to help protect bird populations.

It will soon be critter season all year long in Arkansas. It may be the worst news in a while for coyotes since the Acme Roadrunner trap arrived in the mail.

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission voted to relax hunting regulations on certain predator species.

RELATED: UCAPD help save raccoon hilariously stuck in drain grate

“Raccoons, possums, red fox, coyotes — things like that,” said Randy Zellers, the assistant chief of communications for the AGFC. “What it is going to do is give a private landowner to manage on a local level if he feels that predator populations are high and maybe impacting his ground nesting birds in the area.”

Coyotes and possums like quick meals they can get from a quail’s nest. To manage that, you can now set traps or hunt them with a special permit. There doesn’t have to be a set season, and more importantly, no set hours.

“You will be able to harvest bobcat, coyote, skunk, possum, and raccoon day or night,” Zellers said after getting a free predator-control permit. That lets hunters get them when they are out and active.

Officials are not declaring a critter crisis, but the rules needed updating because the days of every kid running around with a Davy Crockett hat are long gone.

“Years ago, people used to trap animals for pelts,” Zellers said. “As that has gone out of style, there’s not as much money involved in trapping animals for pelts.”

Rules are already in place that allow you to shoot predators if they threaten people, pets, or livestock. This new permit means you can do it more efficiently with an eye on wildlife management.

A hunter is also not responsible for having to turn the skin into a coat or a hat if they have the special permit.

Zellers points out that the permit is mainly for people living in the country.

While coyotes and foxes often encroach on suburban or even residential areas in cities, local firearms laws still supersede the special permit regulations.

RELATED: Dad, teens face-off against growling coyote

If you have a raccoon or skunk problem closer to town, the AGFC has standard advice.

“We still recommend the number one thing is remove all the food sources and make sure those animals are not welcome,” Zellers said.

The permits will be available in late August.