Thousands of cows died in southern storms

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/national/texas-milk-shortage-thousands-cows-died-southern-s/npwks/

This past summer we saw egg rationing, now milk might be coming up short on demands. If this sounds like the apocalypse — well, it’s actually just Texas. (Video via U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance)

The recent Southern storms that caused major damage in states in and around Texas are now resulting in another problem: lack of milk.

Upwards of 30,000 cows died in Texas and New Mexico. As for the ones that are still alive? They’re likely dried up, as cows need to be milked regularly to keep producing.

Last summer, several states, including Texas, started coming up short on eggs after the bird flu struck. Stores started rationing the number of cartons consumers bought, and the event was predicted to affect supply over the next year.

It’s unclear if the price of milk will spike, jugs will be rationed or if this will affect other states. One U.S. Department of Agriculture report says Texas isn’t one of the top five dairy contributors for the U.S., but the 27 million residents of Texas will certainly be affected. (Video via Texas Farm Bureau)

Iowa Egg Farm Investigation

Toyota pulls ad after it was slammed on social media for depicting animals glad to be killed

 http://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/75304848/toyota-pulls-ad-after-it-was-slammed-on-social-media-for-depicting-animals-glad-to-be-killed

A prose quoting fish features in the ad talking up the Hilux.

A prose quoting fish features in the ad talking up the Hilux.

A new Toyota Hilux commercial which attracted backlash on social media will no longer be screened, effective immediately.

Toyota New Zealand made the announcement on Sunday saying the decision reflected feedback from members of the public who had been offended.

In the ad, animals are shown to look forward to death at the hands of hunters if it means they get to ride on the back of a Hilux.

Toyota was at pains to point out all the animals were CGI.

Toyota was at pains to point out all the animals were CGI.

If you wish to see the offending advert, you can watch it here.

Managing director and chief executive officer Alistair Davis said the company apologised for the offence caused. “We’ve listened and we’ll stop screening the ad. The public and in particular Toyota’s customers are the cornerstone of our business and we’ve been closely monitoring the ad’s response and felt the groundswell of detractors was growing.”

Toyota said the animals portrayed in the latest Hilux advertisement were regularly and sustainably hunted and fished except for the possum, which was a familiar pest.

Whitebait that wriggle and talk in the Toyota ad.

Petition: Stop using baby elephants in bars and hotels and beaches in Thailand

Stop using baby elephants in bars and hotels and beaches in Thailand

6,824

7,000

we’ve got 6,824 supporters, help us get to 7,000

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/778/831/285/stop-using-baby-elephants-in-bars-and-hotels-and-beaches-in-thailand/?taf_id=13597515&cid=fb_na

Asian elephants are an endangered species. Experts believe there are now less than 2000 wild elephants living in Thailand. The population is declining at a rapid rate due to loss of habitat.

Illegal capture and trade for use in the tourism industry is also a big problem.

This industry thrives because foreign visitors all want to ride elephants, or watch them do tricks, paying good money for the privilege.

But the fact is that wild elephants need to be tamed before they can be ridden. Except the taming process in Southeast Asia is not the same as with a wild horse. It’s much more brutal, and is accomplished when the elephants are very young.
Wild elephants won’t let humans ride on top of them. So in order to tame a wild elephant, it is tortured as a baby to completely break its spirit. The process is called Phajaan, or “the crush”.

It involves ripping baby elephants away from their mothers and confining them in a very small space, like a cage or hole in the ground where they’re unable to move.

The baby elephants are then beaten into submission with clubs, pierced with sharp bull-hooks, and simultaneously starved and deprived of sleep for many days.

Did you know that riding elephants can actually cause serious long-term harm too? Their spines are not made to support the weight of humans. I know it’s hard to believe given their size, but Zebras are the same way.

Japanese town’s controversial dolphin hunt begins

SeaWorld says it won’t take beluga whales captured in Russia
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/business/os-seaworld-georgia-aquarium-belugas-20150903-story.html

Japanese town’s controversial dolphin hunt begins
http://news.yahoo.com/japanese-towns-annual-dolphin-hunt-begins-104914360.html
“In the annual hunt, people from the southwestern town corral hundreds
of dolphins into a secluded bay and butcher them, turning the water
crimson red. The scene was featured in “The Cove” documentary, drawing
unwanted attention to the little coastal community.”

11214207_829677830435133_118593585578390559_n

“I am Cecil”

11825732_10153390282711508_1843680943326951608_n

Every day we can make a choice to save animals who want to live just as much as Cecil did. https://www.facebook.com/veganoutreach

“…most the friends ive seen talking about cecil are meat eaters and it feels crazy that one animal being killed is outrageous because its “majestic”, “pretty” and “exotic” and yet another animals being killed in the thousands daily is totally fine” Emma Smithies

Army Corps resumes killing East Sand Island cormorants

Dailyastorian.com

By Katie Wilson

EO Media Group

July 17, 2015 12:01AM

Madeline Kalbach/Submitted Photo
Double-crested cormorants like this one spread their wings in the sun to dry after getting them wet in the pursuit of small fish in the water. East Sand Island near Chinook is the location of a major colony of the birds.

<!–

–>

Death toll hit 158 in early July.

CHINOOK, Wash. — Contractors for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are once again killing double-crested cormorants on East Sand Island after stopping for a week at the end of June, saying they didn’t want to disturb nesting birds or orphan newly hatched chicks.

According to numbers released on the Army Corps website, contractors killed 33 birds sometime between July 3 and July 9, bringing the total killed this year to 158. The website does not clarify if the birds killed were only double-crested cormorants; the agency’s depredation permit allows for the accidental take of other cormorant species, including Brandt’s cormorants which also nest on the island, and pelagic cormorants that sometimes fly nearby.

No nests were destroyed through a process called “oiling” during this most recent lethal take period, but sometime between June 9 (the last time numbers were published on the website) and June 24 (when killing had been halted for roughly a week) and before July 3 (the beginning of the most recent take), contractors apparently oiled 3,320 nests, bringing the total of nests oiled to date to 5,089.

This is just 790 nests shy of the total take of nests allowed under a one-year depredation permit issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Oiling prevents eggs from hatching and the bird embryos die in the shell.

Killing authorized

The killing is authorized under a depredation permit the Corps obtained this year as part of a management plan the agency says will protect runs of juvenile salmon by removing a large number of the birds that prey on them.

Two species of cormorant nest seasonally on East Sand Island, a 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River, but only one is targeted under the management plan: double-crested cormorants. The colony’s numbers have swelled in recent years and the Corps says adult birds consume millions of young protected and endangered salmon every year.

The depredation permit, which must be renewed annually, is valid through Jan. 31, 2016. But the birds are only on the island seasonally, arriving in the early spring to begin nesting and departing when colder weather rolls in.

Orphaned chicks could starve

The Audubon Society of Portland fears killing birds at the height of the nesting season impacts the colony in ways the agencies have not adequately accounted for, since any orphaned chicks will likely starve to death or die from exposure.

Audubon is suing the Corps, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Corps’ contractors — the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service — regarding the double-crested cormorant management plan.

The Corps says the contractors are taking care not to shoot nesting parent birds.

“They’re very specific about how they’re only culling adults where they can clearly see there are no eggs present,” said Army Corps spokeswoman Diana Fredlund.

Under the management plan, the Corps plans to reduce the total number of breeding pairs on the island from about 14,000 to 5,600 by 2018, a move the Audubon Society says unnecessarily slashes a healthy colony during a time when double-crested cormorants are struggling elsewhere.

Rod Stewart sparks outrage after wearing ‘vile’ sealskin coat ahead of concert in Canada

http://www.express.co.uk/news/showbiz/591092/Rod-Stewart-sparks-outrage-wearing-sealskin-coat-concert-Canada

ROCKER Rod Stewart has been blasted by a protest group after he posed for photos wearing a sealskin coat ahead of a concert in St John’s, Canada.

PUBLISHED: 08:00, Wed, Jul 15, 2015 | UPDATED: 15:34, Wed, Jul 15, 2015


Rod Stewart FACEBOOK

Rod Stewart sparked outrage after he posed wearing a sealskin coat


The 70-year-old crooner has been branded “vile” after he was snapped wearing the jacket at a furrier called Always in Vogue.

Rod angered animal activists worldwide with his apparent support of the Canadian sealing industry.

Most seal products are banned in Europe and the US over cruelty concerns when baby seals are clubbed to death.

The fur shop shared a picture of employee Darren Halloran posing with Rod, clad in the coat, on their Facebook and Twitter accounts after he reportedly had the controversial garment custom-fitted for him.