Bowhunter leaves bear cubs without mother

Bowhunter leaves bear cubs without mother

MARK NIELSEN / PRINCE GEORGE CITIZEN

JUNE 2, 2017

The B.C. Conservation Officer Service has rescued one black bear cub and is keeping an eye out for two more after their mother was killed by a bowhunter in the Hart this week.

The sow’s body was found Wednesday off Aintree Drive near the Inverness Mobile Home Park.

Conservation officers found the three cubs up a tree in the vicinity on Thursday and were able to tranquilize one but the other two were too far up for a safe shot so they were left alone.

“I’ve got a couple of residents there who are going to keep an eye out and if they see them and if they are able to, are going to grab them and toss them in a kennel because they’re pretty small,” conservation officer Eamon McArthur said Friday afternoon.

Killing a sow bear with cubs is a violation of the Wildlife Act, as is failing to retrieve a kill. Bowhunting within city limits is legal although the consequences can be stiff if someone is hit by an errant arrow.

Although a warning or a fine is still possible, hunters who kill a sow is asked to report the incident to the Conservation Officer Service so the cubs can be rescued.

“This is relatively close to town and we’ve managed to locate one of the cubs but if this was out in the bush and they just dropped and left it, well those cubs would starve to death, likely,” McArthur said.

Anyone who has information on who is responsible for the death is asked to call the Conservation Officer Service at 1-877-952-7277.

– See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/local-news/bowhunter-leaves-bear-cubs-without-mother-1.20378863#sthash.dEq564YS.dpuf

How fear of death affects human attitudes toward animal life

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170424170801.htm

Date:
April 24, 2017
Source:
University of Arizona
Summary:
When reminded of death, humans become more likely to support the killing of animals, no matter how they feel about animal rights, researchers have found. Psychology’s terror management theory may explain why. The researchers’ findings could also help scientists better understand the psychological motivations behind the murder and genocide of humans.
Uri Lifshin holds his cat, Chupchik. Lifshin’s own love of animals is, in part, what drove him to study humans’ psychological reasons for supporting killing them.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Arizona

When reminded of death, humans become more likely to support killing animals, regardless of their existing attitudes about animal rights, according to new research from the University of Arizona.

The research provides new insight into the psychology behind humans’ willingness to kill animals for a variety of reasons, and could also potentially help scientists better understand the psychological motivations behind the murder and genocide of humans, said lead researcher Uri Lifshin, a doctoral student in the UA Department of Psychology.

Lifshin and his colleagues conducted a series of experiments based on their existing work on terror management theory — the idea that humans’ awareness of their own mortality is a strong motivator for behaviors that may help quell the fear of death.

During the experiments, half of participants were presented with a subliminal or subtle “death prime”; either they saw the word “dead” flash briefly on a computer screen or they saw an image of a T-shirt featuring a skull made up of several iterations of the word “death.”

The other half of participants — the controls — instead saw the word “pain” or “fail” flash across the screen, or they saw an image of a plain T-shirt.

Study participants were then asked to rate how much they agree with a series of statements about killing animals, such as, “It is often necessary to control for animal overpopulation through different means, such as hunting or euthanasia,” or, “An experiment should never cause the killing of animals.” The researchers avoided asking questions about some of the more broadly accepted justifications for killing animals, like doing so for food.

In all experiments, those who received the death prime were more likely to support killing animals.

Prior to the start of experiments, participants were asked to report their feelings about animal rights. Surprisingly, it didn’t matter if people self-identified as supporters of animal rights. While those individuals were overall less likely than others to support killing animals, the death prime still had the same effect on them.

“If you’re an animal lover or if you care about animals rights, then overall, yes, you are going to support the killing of animals much less; however when you’re reminded of death you’re still going to be a little bit more reactive,” Lifshin said. Worth noting, the study did not include overt animal rights activists, who might be affected differently. Additional research is needed for that population, Lifshin said.

Gender also didn’t change the effect of the death prime. Consistent with existing literature, male participants were generally more likely than females to support killing animals, but males and females were both affected in the same way by the death prime.

Self-Esteem Helps Us Manage Fear of Death

The UA researchers’ paper, “The Evil Animal: A Terror Management Theory Perspective on the Human Tendency to Kill Animals,” was published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Their findings are based on psychology’s terror management theory, which is derived from anthropologist Ernest Becker’s 1974 Pulitzer Prize-winning book, “The Denial of Death.” The theory posits that humans use self-esteem as a buffer against fear of death.

Self-esteem can be achieved in different ways. In a previous study, Lifshin and his colleagues showed that when people who enjoy playing basketball are reminded of their mortality, they improve their performance on the basketball court, and thereby their self-esteem, to manage their fear of death.

In the animal study, researchers think death-primed participants supported killing animals more because it provided them with a sense of power or superiority over animals that indirectly helped them fend off fear of mortality, Lifshin said.

This all happens subconsciously.

“Sometimes, our self-esteem depends on the idea that we are special and not just sacks of meat. We want to feel powerful, immortal — not like an animal,” said Lifshin, a proud pet owner whose own love of animals is, in part, what drove him to study why anyone would do them harm.

To further test the terror management connection, Lifshin and his colleagues designed one of their experiments to look at whether giving participants an alternative self-esteem boost would change the effect of the death prime.

It did.

Before each of the experiments conducted by Lifshin and his colleagues, participants were told a cover story to conceal the researchers’ actual aim. In the self-esteem boost experiment, participants were told they were taking part in a word relationship study, and were asked to identify whether pairs of word on a computer screen were related. During the course of the experiment, the word “dead” appeared on the screen for 30 milliseconds to some participants.

When the experimenters praised those who had seen the death prime — telling them: “Oh wow, I’m not sure I’ve seen a score this high on this task, this is really good” — the effect of the death prime was eliminated when participants went on to answer the questions about killing animals. In other words, seeing the death prime did not make participants more supportive of killing animals if they subsequently received a self-esteem boost from a different source.

“We didn’t find that people’s general state of self-esteem made a difference; it was this self-esteem boost,” Lifshin said. “Once your self-esteem is secured, you no longer need to satisfy the need for terror management by killing animals.”

Those who saw the death prime and were given neutral feedback from the experimenters (“OK you did good, just as well as most people do on this task”) still supported killing animals more. The neutral feedback did not change the effect of the death prime.

Findings Could Contribute to Understanding Psychology of Genocide

When researchers asked participants to rate statements about killing humans under various conditions, the death prime did not have the same effect; those who saw the death prime were not more likely to support killing humans.

Even so, the research could still have important implications for the study of the psychology behind murder and genocide of humans who fall into outgroups because of their race, religion or other characteristics, since those individuals tend to be dehumanized by those who would do them harm, Lifshin said.

“We dehumanize our enemies when there is genocide. There is research in social psychology showing that if you go to places where genocide is happening and you ask the people who are doing the killing to try to explain, they’ll often say things like, ‘Oh, they’re cockroaches, they’re rats, we just have to kill them all,'” Lifshin said. “So if we ever want to really understand how to reduce or fight human-to-human genocide, we have to understand our killing of animals.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Arizona. Original written by Alexis Blue.

Approximately 40-50 Pilot Whales Slaughtered in the Danish Faroe Islands

#BREAKING:
After a chase lasting almost four hours approximately 40-50 pilot whales have been slaughtered on the killing beach at Bøur.
On May 8th 2017 Sea Shepherd Nederland officially submitted a request to the European Commission (EC) to start infringement proceedings against Denmark for facilitating the slaughter of pilot whales and other cetaceans in the Faroe Islands, with the formal support of 27

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Sea Shepherd Faroe Islands Campaign added 4 new photos.

#BreakingNews

The pilot whales have been driven up onto the beach, after an exhausting chase that lasted almost 4 stressful hours.

The pod has been estimated to be around 40 individuals who are now forced to endure a painful death in the blood of their relatives.

We will update more tomorrow. Please remember to share these posts, and sign our petition to hold Denmark accountable for slaughter of the pilot whales here: http://bit.ly/2rdZEM0

#OpBloodyFjords #OpGrindini #OpGrindStop #Grind #visitfaroeislands

Photos by Jn.fo

THE EMBLEM; A POEM TO END HUNTING

 http://thevegantruth.blogspot.com/2016/07/the-emblem-poem-to-end-hunting.html?spref=fb
The Emblem
I’m not blind to the world animals live in.
Their reality is intertwined with my own.
Therefore I would not know where to begin
to describe the cruelty animals are shown.
Humans have become deaf to creatures cries,
We’ve become numb to the feeling of love.
One sight entirely exemplifies
the lack of empathy that I speak of.
Tied to a truck for obvious display,
was a beautiful buck; lifeless and cold.
His disfigured head quickly turned my eyes away
I’m left with an indelible image to hold.
The buck will serve as an emblem for all time.
I must have witnessed this sight for a reason.
The emblem will forever tell of the crime
that permeates the air in hunting season.
The gentle are persecuted by killers
and live a life that is never free of fear.
Respect and Justice are our soul’s pillars.
Let’s rise up and put an end to the hunting of deer.

by Butterflies; long term vegan ~ animal rights advocate

Signs of Consciousness, Sentience and Intelligence in Nature Demand Our Respect

From: Ecoterra-internalional.org


By
Sofia Adamson (*), Staff Writer WakingTimesMay 10, 2017

Part of our lot as human beings on planet earth is dominion over the plant and animal kingdoms, and as a by-product of our economic and cultural heritage, we have largely become indifferent to the suffering of animals. An indicator of the cruelest aspects of our nature.

This systemic disrespect for nature and her creatures is part of, or symptomatic of, a larger problem with modern society, the institutionalized perception that we are separate and independent of our environment. This dualism is part of the division of consciousness that is often noted in ancient texts as well as contemporary discussions of the characteristics of human consciousness.

Perhaps the most appalling sign of human kind’s dualistic trap is how we treat our friends in the animal kingdom. Yet this destructive idea is a tragic falsehood, as animals and plants alike are conscious, sentient and intelligent. The examples of this are everywhere today, and in this video, we see humpback whales clearly showing their appreciation to the humans who freed them from fishing nets.

WATCH: Saving Valentina.6.8.11.h264.mov

We are now also discovering the deeper lives of plants, and in a research study spanning some 30 plus years, biologists have discovered the songs of plants.

LISTEN: Singing Plants at Damanhur | Des plantes qui jouent de la musique

Forest ecologist Dr. Suzanne Simard of the University of British Colombia has uncovered the subterranean network of organisms that allow trees to communicate with one another.

LEARN: Tree’s found to communicate through Fungi [Avatar!]

It appears that animal consciousness is rising at present here on planet earth, in spite of wholesale neglect. Elephants can understand and correctly interpret human gestures, and chimpanzees are developing new behaviors and skills. Here, Kanzi the bonobo chimpanzee starts a campfire to roast marshmallows.

SEE: Bonobo builds a fire and toasts marshmallows

Chimps have now been observed using tools to fish for food, a sign of their continuing cognitive development.

REALIZE: Chimpanzees fishing for algae with tools in Bakoun, Guinea

Their learning process is now being compared to that of human children, and in the following video, an experiment demonstrates the similarities between the two.

COMPARE: Chimpanzee VS Human child learning

Many of the world’s most majestic animals are under direct threat of extinction today, and while most humans fail to appreciate this for what it really means, others continue to learn from animals, admiring their tenacity in the face of overwhelming pressure from humans. In the following case a pack of Andean bears works together to dismantle remote wildlife cameras.

RESPECT: Remote Cameras Reveal: Andean Bears Hate Paparazzi

Animals display a broad range of emotion as well, as is sometimes revealed in front of cameras, for example here, when a leopard exhibits compassion for the child of monkey it has just killed.

UNDERSTAND: Leopard Kills Monkey and Discovers Baby! INCREDIBLE REACTION!

And animals also like to have fun, as is seen in this clip of dolphins getting high off puffer fish and having a good time in the wide open ocean.

ENJOY: Dolphins on Stimulants – Pass the Puffer!

You don’t have to look to hard to find signs of mankind’s disrespect, disregard, and distrust of nature. Raising awareness of our connection and dependence on the natural world in these materialistic times is the only way to counter the devastation. Fukushima, the Deepwater Horizon, mountain-top removal, deforestation, tar sands, fracking, plastic pollution, depleted uranium, animal cruelty, so on and on… there really is no end to our ignorance and disrespect.

Whatever your relationship to the natural world is, and no matter what kind of dystopian illusions you may have for our future, there is no escaping the truth that we are all products of nature, and as such dependent on the natural world for survival and happiness.

(*) Sofia Adamson is a contributing writer for Waking Times with a keen appreciation for matters of science and the spirit.
Read more articles from Sofia Adamson

This article (Signs of Consciousness, Sentience and Intelligence in Nature Demand Our Respect) was originally created and published by Waking Times and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Sofia Adamson and WakingTimes.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution and author bio.

____________________________________________________________

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Oklahoma May Legalize Hog Hunting From Helicopters

https://www.usnews.com/news/offbeat/articles/2017-03-28/oklahoma-may-legalize-hog-hunting-from-helicopters

Oklahoma could soon join Louisiana and Texas in allowing hunters to shoot feral hogs from helicopters.

| March 28, 2017, at 1:06 p.m.

Oklahoma May Legalize Hog Hunting From Helicopters
The Associated Press

FILE – In this Feb. 18, 2009, file photo, the shadow of a helicopter hovers over feral pigs near Mertzon, Texas. Oklahoma lawmakers are considering a bill to allow hunters to shoot feral hogs from helicopters. Aerial gunners are already used to help control feral swine in Oklahoma, but the work can only be done by trained, licensed contractors with support from the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture Food and Forestry. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File) THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma could soon join Louisiana and Texas in allowing hunters to shoot feral hogs from helicopters.

The Tulsa World (http://bit.ly/2neDl3i ) reports that aerial gunners are already used to help control feral swine in Oklahoma. But that work can only be done by trained, licensed contractors with support from the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture Food and Forestry.

Lawmakers are considering a bill to expand the law to private operations.

Under the proposal, private landowners, companies and pilots would have to apply for a state license and be responsible for the activity. But hunters on board the aircraft wouldn’t need a license, nor would they have to provide their names to the state.

The agriculture department says its agents killed more than 11,200 feral hogs, mostly by air, last year.

___

Information from: Tulsa World, http://www.tulsaworld.com

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press

Tags: Oklahoma, Louisiana, Texas

Petition: Setting A Bear Trap

MAR 27, 2017 — Watch as we set off a large bear trap and show just how barbaric these devices truly are .

Please keep sharing our petition and make your voice heard.

https://www.change.org/p/urge-president-trump-to-keep-protections-in-alaska-s-refuges/u/19835423?utm_medium=email&utm_source=49788&utm_campaign=petition_update&sfmc_tk=oaBgxvdiP59gcWpbzPpWk2XoacEu2Nr8E8nGwlHzYTdZgvECEmuDRGG3dJhnPhaJ

French parliament votes to install cameras in slaughterhouses

January 18, 2017

Amid rising reports of animal abuses at meat processing facilities, France’s parliament has voted that slaughterhouses be required to install surveillance cameras to monitor workers’ interactions with live animals.

The proposed legislation, which was approved by 28 members on Jan. 12, would give the country’s nearly 1,000 slaughterhouses until Jan. 1, 2018 to install CCTV cameras everywhere live animals are handled, including monitoring the transport process and while they’re being held in stables, reports Politico.

FRENCH PEOPLE CAN’T ENOUGH HAMBURGERS

According to the bill, the footage from each slaughterhouse would only be viewable to veterinarians, approved government officials or animal-welfare inspectors and would be kept on government file for a month. The bill also proposes the creations of a national Committee on the Ethics of Slaughterhouses, which would oversee and mete out harsher penalties to facilities caught violating the law.

The move comes amid heightened scrutiny of the country’s meat industry. In 2016, animal rights activist group L214 released troubling footage showing numerous animal abuses at several French meat-processing facilities inclduing workers killing animals without stunning them first, throwing lambs into walls, and hitting live animals.

Though the bill passed in parliament—where just four MPs opposed the legislation—it must still be approved by France’s senate. According to Reuters, the vote could happen as early as February.

More:
Cameras to be installed in all slaughterhouses in Israel (Jerusalem Online)
http://www.jerusalemonline.com/news/in-israel/local/cameras-to-be-installed-in-all-slaughterhouses-in-israel-14480

Israel Moves to Install Cameras in Slaughterhouses to Prevent Cruelty (Haaretz)
http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-1.694463

Outrageous Anti-Animal Acts Planned for Alaska

From: HSUS.org

Earlier this week, the U.S. Senate chose to turn nightmare into reality for animals living in our nation’s wildlife refuges — federal land in Alaska specifically set aside for them to thrive, not to become targets of inhumane and unsporting killing methods.

By a 52 to 47 party-line vote, Senators voted to repeal a 2016 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service rule forbidding the most outrageous acts:

Black bears being caught in painful snare traps while foraging for food …

Wolf pups being shot point-blank in their dens …

Grizzly bears being chased by plane or helicopter before being shot down by trophy hunters …

All this cruelty and suffering for trophies.

With this heartbreaking vote, Congress enabled 76 million acres of our national wildlife refuges to become killing fields for trappers, baiters and spring trophy hunters.

The politicians in Washington who voted to allow these cruel practices do not represent the views of regular Americans on animal welfare or wildlife conservation. They sided with the special interests who want to kill wolf pups and hibernating grizzly bears for pleasure.

And this is only one of the recent attacks on animals:

  • Congress is trying to cherry-pick wolves from the federal list of endangered species, exposing them to trophy hunting, commercial trapping and hounding.
  • The Department of the Interior will allow millions of birds and other animals to suffer from lead poisoning by reversing an order restricting the use of toxic lead ammunition on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands.
  • Tennessee walking horses are still at risk of having chemicals burned into their skin until the anti-soring rule is unfrozen under the new administration.
  • And the U.S. Department of Agriculture has purged its website of government inspection reports on thousands of puppy mills, roadside zoos and other facilities.

Coyote Refused To Give Up On Mate Caught In Trap

Brooks Fahy has been working for decades to save wild animals from painful traps — and while he has seen hundreds of sad cases, there’s one coyote he’ll never forget.

Fahy, who is the executive director of the nonprofit Predator Defense, received a call from a concerned citizen about an animal caught in a trap. After scouring the Oregon woods, he found the young coyote — his leg was badly pinched in a leghold trap.

Brooks Fahy/Predator Defense

“When I walked up on that coyote, he looked at me and then he looked down, like he was ready to accept his fate,” Fahy told The Dodo.

Animals caught in traps can wait days before they’re found and killed — sometimes for their meat or fur, other times just for recreation. Some animals caught in traps try to gnaw off their own limbs out of desperation. “Traps are notoriously nonselective, whether it’s an M44, a neck snare, a leghold trap, any animal that comes along could get caught,” Fahy said. Endangered species and even people’s beloved dogs can be injured or even killed because of indiscriminate traps.

The trap was set out by Wildlife Services, a branch of the USDA that kills tens of thousands of coyotes each year by trapping, shooting, snaring and poisoning them.

Warning: Graphic image below

The coyote Fahy found seemed to be determined to stay alive. There were some puddles of melted snow near him, which he appeared to have been drinking from, Fahy said: “He had been in the trap a long time, a week minimum.”

Fahy also noticed a branch sticking up out of the ground beside him that was all chewed up.

“He’d been gnawing on it to relieve the pain,” Fahy said.

As Fahy got closer, he noticed paw prints in the ground and the vestiges of smaller animals. “There were these small bones around him — we realized that a mate was bringing him food,” Fahy remembers. “It’s gut-wrenching. It haunts me to this day.”

Fahy did everything he could to save the 2-year-old coyote’s life. Except for his terrible injury, he appeared healthy. “He was in his prime,” Fahy said.

But the coyote’s foot was completely ruined — the bones were jutting out through his skin. And the animal appeared to be exhausted from trying to survive. “When I picked him up and wrapped him in a blanket, I felt him completely relax in my arms,” Fahy said. “He had nothing left.”

Brooks Fahy/Predator Defense

Fahy carried the young coyote a mile to his truck and then drove him to see a veterinarian. Sadly, the coyote was just in too much pain, so Brooks held him while the veterinarian euthanized him with an injection.

“I’ve dealt with hundreds of trapping cases. I’ve seen animals who have lost their teeth because they’re gnawing so hard on the trap, I’ve seen it all,” Brooks said. “But I think of this coyote every day.”

Fahy holds the coyote as he’s being euthanized.Brooks Fahy/Predator Defense

This coyote died in 1992. “Virtually nothing has changed,” Fahy said. “If anything, it’s gotten worse.”

Hundreds of thousands of coyotes like him have been killed since then, many of them by these painful traps. In 2016 alone, Wildlife Services killed 76,963 adult coyotes; over 19,000 of them were killed by leghold traps, foothold traps, leg snares and neck snares. And that doesn’t even count how many coyotes and other animals were killed through trapping by private citizens.

“The brutality of these traps cannot be overstated,” Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, said in a statement. “Steel-jaw leghold traps and Conibear traps slam shut with bone-crushing force, causing massive injury and trauma. Animals trapped in strangulation neck snares — designed to tighten around an animal’s neck as he or she struggles — also suffer in extreme agony for an unconscionable amount of time.”

“Steel-jaw leghold traps, snares, and Conibear traps can cause massive pain, injury and even death to anyone who crosses its path,” Jennifer Place, a program associate at Born Free USA who specializes in trapping issues, told The Dodo. “We have seen it happen too many times: a mountain lion cub caught in a leghold trap; a dog who breaks her teeth to the gum line in her panic to free herself from a trap; a boy rushed to the ER with a Conibear trap on his arm; a young man getting ensnared in a Conibear trap set near a park playground. These traps are cruel, archaic and terrifyingly indiscriminate, and they can be found anywhere.”

There are bills in the U.S. House of Representatives that could finally put some limits on trapping, Place added, like the Refuge from Cruel Trapping Act (H.R. 1438), which seeks to ban leghold traps and body traps in national wildlife refuges. “It is time to stop the further spread and use of these brutal devices,” she said.

Another bill introduced to the House this month is the Public Safety and Wildlife Protection Act (H.R. 1629), which aims to ban the import, export and interstate commerce of steel-jaw leghold traps and Conibear traps, the two most widely used traps in the U.S. And it’s expected that the Limiting Inhumane Federal Trapping (LIFT) for Public Safety Act, which seeks to ban traps on federal lands managed by the Department of the Interior and Wildlife Services, will be reintroduced.

People who have been fighting trapping for years are hopeful that some of the suffering could soon come to an end — but the public needs to know about what’s going on and to speak up for these animals.

“I’ve been doing this work for 40 years and I never cease to be amazed that this is still going on,” Fahy said. “We know through science that these species are self-regulating. It’s time we evolve as a society and stop thinking of animals as natural resources. It’s important for us to empathize with these animals, to feel the loneliness of an animal caught in a trap. They feel pain. They suffer. They want to live.”

To help save animals from suffering in traps, you can call your representatives and urge them to support these bills, or you can write to them about H.R. 1629 and H.R. 1438. You can also donate to Predator Defense.