Trophy Hunting

http://www.all-creatures.org/cash/articles-trophy.html

Article posted by C.A.S.H. Committee To Abolish Sport Hunting

CLICK HERE for more from CASH COURIER NEWSLETTER, Fall 2017

By Peter Muller, VP of C.A.S.H.

Trophy hunting is the selective hunting of wild game for human recreation. In “Trophy Hunting” the entire animal or part of the animal is kept as the “trophy.” It is frequently kept as a remembrance of the hunt. The game sought is usually the oldest with the largest body size, largest antlers or other distinguishing attributes.

trophy hunting

Trophy hunting has both supporters as well as opponents – both from within the hunting fraternity and from outside of it. Discussions concerning trophy hunting are not only about the question of the morality of recreational hunting and the supposed conservation efforts of hunting, but also the observed decline in the animal species that are targets for trophy hunting.
Trophy hunting occurs internationally at many levels. We all remember the worldwide press coverage and outcry that Cecil received with many negative comments regarding that taking.

Was it legal?

Was Cecil “set up” for the kill by a wealthy American?

What was the benefit of the money paid by the hunter to the local community?

and so on..

However, let’s restrict this discussion to the US only and look at the arguments in favor and opposed to trophy hunting in the US.
In the US, trophy hunters select their targets according to whether the animal has the largest horns, antlers, or other visible attributes that would be of importance to pass on to future generations – in other words, they are genetically laden with attributes that need to be passed on to future generations for the benefit of the species as a whole.

To selectively kill off these genetically laden members of the species will gradually diminish these positive attributes from appearing in future versions of the species as a whole. In other words, the species, as a whole would slowly but surely decline.

Trophy hunting causes what has been referred to as “unnatural selection.” It has been shown to reduce antler size and body size in roe deer and horn size and body size in mountain sheep.

This unnatural selection which is common to all groups that are trophy hunted likely compromises the long-term viability of all terrestrial and aquatic species.

You can read more here: Fred Allendorf and Jeffery Hard, “Human Induced Evolution Caused by Unnatural Selection through Harvest of Wild Animals,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 106 (2009); 9987-94.

To compensate for smaller bucks, game managers now cooperate with the Quality Deer Management Association to build herds with large antlers for sport hunting.

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CLICK HERE for more from CASH COURIER NEWSLETTER, Fall 2017

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Olympia man taken to Harborview Medical Center after hunting accident

Snowfall-YH-011317-4.jpg

A fog looms over Rimrock lake off of U.S. Highway 12 near White Pass, Wash., Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017. The area has already seen snow this fall, not as much as pictured here, but that won’t be far away. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic file)

NACHES, Wash. — A 28-year-old Olympia man is at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle after accidentally shooting himself in the elbow while hunting near Rimrock Lake Thursday.

But it took more than two hours to get him there after a helicopter had to turn around due to of inclement weather.

The man was hunting with a primitive, muzzle-loading rifle, said sheriff’s Sgt. Judd Towell. Just after 10:30 a.m., he slipped and dropped his rifle, which fell behind his arm and discharged — shooting him in the back of the elbow, said Chief Criminal Deputy Ed Levesque. Deputies would not release the man’s name Thursday.

Towell said when the older, more primitive weapons hit the ground it sometimes causes them to release the lock and fire.

The man was able to apply his own tourniquet, tell dispatchers where he was and walk to the nearest road so deputies could find him, Towell said.

“He’s a pretty responsible guy,” he said. “He really saved his own life.”

An ambulance picked him up around 1 p.m., and took him to a local hospital, before he was flown to Harborview. Information on his condition was not available Thursday evening.

Towell said the gunshot wound was not life-threatening, however the man could lose his arm.

Corps cracks down on illegal deer hunting in Collin County

http://starlocalmedia.com/allenamerican/news/corps-cracks-down-on-illegal-deer-hunting-in-collin-county/article_73474800-af05-11e7-bd1b-d758bec3f311.html

  • Kelsey Samuels
Hunting
Hunters can no longer hunt deer or hogs on land owned by the US Army Corps of Engineers.

Courtesy of Luke Clayton

The start of hunting season is underway, and this year the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers made a significant change to its hunting rules. Through the duration of deer hunting season, hog hunting is no longer allowed on Corps land. Deer hunting season is Sept. 30 until the first of January.

According to Mike Stephens, Collin County game warden, this rule was instituted to reduce the risk of illegal hunting White Tail deer in Collin County.

As Collin County has changed and developed, rural spaces are now being developed for homes, businesses and community centers. This change has significantly reduced the roaming space for wildlife in the county.

“With all the urbanization in Collin County, we’re really pushing a lot of the animals in different directions, and one of those animals is our deer herd,” he said.

The county’s deer population is quite small; however, what the herds lack in numbers, they make up for in antler size.

“We have very very large antlers in Collin County. Trophy bucks in any other county are your typical deer here in Collin. We’re very fortunate because we have a lot of trophy here, but there’s not [as much] range for these deer,” Stephens said.

The majority of the deer herds call 6,000 acres of Corps land home near Lake Lavon. This land is free and open to the public – with a permit – for dove, squirrel rabbit, and, until recently, feral hog hunting. Wardens have had an issue with illegal deer hunting on Corps land in the past, Stephens said and hog hunting was often the main reason why.

According to Stephens, if approached by a game warden, hunters tell wardens they’re hog hunting even though they plan on deer hunting. Hunters can have all the tools that suggest they’re deer hunting, but there’s nothing wardens can do to prove them otherwise, he said. “We have to take their word for it. That has been the norm.”

But now that hog hunting is outlawed, “that excuse doesn’t fly anymore,” he said, which will help game wardens crack down on poachers in the area.

All deer hunting in Collin County occurs on privately owned land, “so unless you know somebody or you’re paying for a lease, the possibilities of deer hunting are not going to be available to you,” he said. Illegally hunting deer is a state jail felony, and the Corps is prepared to prosecute and demand restitution for any lost deers.

Stephens added that first-time hunters looking to legally hunt this year must also attend a hunting education course. The latest legislation states anyone born on or after Sept. 2, 1971, must attend a classroom or online course to obtain this education license. Veterans, law enforcement or current military personnel are exempt from this rule.

First-time hunters should also keep their rifles or shotguns at home if they plan to hunt deer in Collin County: It’s an archery-only county.

“With the rifle, you have the distance on the animals. It’s a lot easier to kill the deer. With archery, it’s a lot more competitive. It’s more of a sport hunt,” he said. “And a lot of that deals with our herd. We don’t have a very large herd here, so we want to preserve that herd for future generations to hunt.”

Appeals Court Hears Case Accusing Officials of Animal Cruelty for Bow-Hunting Program

 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY PARKS

Several weeks into the Montgomery Parks bow-hunting season, appellate judges in Annapolis on Thursday heard attorneys argue about whether this method of culling deer is animal cruelty.

Bethesda resident Eilene Cohhn has spent about two years challenging a deer-management policy that she believes is inhumane and unnecessary. Her representative, a staff attorney with the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, argues that it’s also unlawful.

“The (Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission) has the right to kill deer. They don’t have the right to make them suffer before they die, if that is avoidable,” attorney Jenni James said, adding that using sharpshooters is preferable.

But an attorney for the park system contended that prohibitions against mistreating animals deal primarily with harming pets, not killing deer.

“I would submit that the animal cruelty code really has no application to hunting at all,” MNCPPC attorney William Dickerson said.

James rebutted that she doesn’t believe the archery program counts as “hunting,” in the legal sense. While most people think of hunting as a sporting activity done for fun or for food, MNCPPC established the archery program to help control the deer population, she said. Therefore, it shouldn’t qualify for the hunting exemption to the state’s animal cruelty law, James argued.

The three judges who listened to the roughly hour-long debate pressed James to explain what distinguishes Montgomery County’s bow hunting from similar lawful activities across the state.

“Why can’t they, on their land, authorize the same thing that could be done on Fort Frederick State Park?” Judge Donald Beachley asked, referring to a park west of Hagerstown.

James said the park system’s purpose—to thin the deer herds—and ability to choose other options set this situation apart.

Beachley also referenced a state bear hunting program and asked whether that, too, violates the animal cruelty laws because its objective is population management.

The PETA attorney responded that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has greater authority to run hunting programs than MNCPPC.

The judges spent less time questioning Dickerson, although they did ask him whether the MNCPPC hunt follows DNR guidelines. Dickerson said it did.

They also pushed back on Dickerson’s suggestion that the animal protection laws don’t have any bearing on hunting activities; Judge Andrea Leahy noted that the statute requires hunters to use the “most humane method reasonably available.”

Montgomery Parks in 2015 added archery to its deer management program, which also includes shotgun hunting and Park Police sharpshooting. Through the program, groups of insured archery hunters take aim at deer in parts of Great Seneca Stream Valley Park in Germantown and Watts Branch Stream Valley Park in Potomac from September through January, according to its website.

For about 20 years, MNCPPC has been hunting deer as a strategy for controlling an overpopulation problem that can damage wild habitats and increase the likelihood of car crashes.

It decided to explore bow hunting in parks near communities or other areas where shooting a firearm might be unsafe.

Cohhn said her home backs up to Stratton Local Park in Bethesda, and she often has deer meandering through her yard.

“I’ve gone out at night, and they’re on my porch. They’re the babies,” she said. “They’re beautiful animals.”

Cohhn said she wishes people could coexist with deer, but if officials find it necessary to curb the population, sharpshooting is a more humane approach than archery.

The likelihood of maiming a deer instead of killing it rises with archery, compared to shooting, James said. Deer shot with an arrow tend to die more slowly, she added.

Parks officials report that in its first two seasons, the archery pilot program wounding rate was 7 percent and 3 percent, an indication of how many deer were shot but not immediately killed.

Cohhn filed her lawsuit about two years ago in Montgomery County Circuit Court. After a judge last year ruled against Cohhn and PETA, she appealed her case to the Maryland Court of Special Appeals for consideration.

James said she doesn’t know when to expect the appeals court judges to issue a decision in the case.

Indiana women charged with using bait to hunt deer while filming TV show

http://www.indystar.com/story/news/2017/10/01/indiana-women-charged-using-bait-hunt-deer-while-filming-tv-show/721193001/

Fox59Published 1:33 p.m. ET Oct. 1, 2017

ROCKVILLE, Ind. – Two Indiana women were filming a TV show when they were cited for allegedly using bait to hunt deer, according to Fox59.

Now, Jody L. Davies, 47, and Sarah Ross, 32, are facing multiple counts of hunting deer with the aid of bait as well as charges for an illegally taken deer.

Conservation officers say the charges are the result of an extensive investigation conducted over the past three years.

DNR says multiple baited stands have been identified and documented on hunting properties used by the women in both Parke and Putnam counties beginning in 2015.

Officers say Davies has been featured on social media and in articles with many prominent outdoor magazines in reference to the two trophy class whitetail bucks she killed in 2015 and 2016, both of which were harvested during the investigation. She also reportedly films for a hunting TV show.

Officers want to remind hunters that all substances placed for animal consumption, along with any affected soil, must be completely removed from the hunting area at least ten days prior to the hunting.

70-year-old wanted to ‘wear a coonskin cap, hunt bears, be a real woodsman’ — so he did

Biggest muley
Bill Butler shot this mule deer northwest of Hermosillo, Mexico, about 750 miles south of his Wyoming home. The buck’s antlers measured 36 inches wide and had a gross score of more than 195. He collected the trophy animal just days shy of his 70th birthday.

Courtesy photo

Five days short of his 70th birthday last year, Bill Butler shot the biggest mule deer of his long hunting life.

That’s saying something for a guy who literally wrote the book on “The Versatile Trophy Hunter.”

“I’m getting old, but I’m still poking around,” he said.

His love for hunting started when he was just a boy. That was when he developed an “intense instinct and desire.”

“I’ve slacked off a bit as I’ve gotten older, but I still like to get a good animal,” he said.

As if to prove the fact, on Sept. 5 he shot the largest bull elk of his life, which green scored 352 gross and had a 54-inch main beam. He shot the 8×6 elk from a ground blind at 325 yards. He would have preferred to stalk the bull, but with so many other elk in the area, he had little choice.

Montana boy

Bill grew up in Silesia, Montana, hunting with his father, Jim Butler, as soon as he passed Hunter Education at age 12. A photo in his book shows him looking a little unhappy at that age. His father balances a rifle and his right foot on the bumper of a car while draping an arm around his son. An antelope’s leg can be seen sticking out of the trunk. Bill wears a Davy Crockett shirt in the photo, a figure idolized by the youngster in 1958.

“I wanted to wear a coonskin cap, hunt bears, be a real woodsman, and wander throughout the wilderness when I grew up,” Bill wrote in the photo caption.

And he did.

“Growing up through high school, my brothers and I hunted as intensely as young wolves, taking many deer and antelope,” Bill wrote. “Soon we were shooting the legal limit of two deer each. We had more than enough meat to eat at home and supplied several neighbors, also.”

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Bill's big whitetail
While hunting in Saskatchewan, Butler found this big whitetail on Dec. 1, 2016. The buck gross scored 169.

Courtesy photo

Outfitting

After high school Bill started guiding hunters, including difficult backpacking trips for bighorn sheep in remote and lofty portions of the Beartooth Mountains. Just hiking to the locations would be a 15- to 20-mile trip, he said. The outings paid off in five bighorn sheep for him, in addition to those he guided clients to.

“I carried 120 pounds for two days one time when I guided for a hunter,” Bill said, packing out their camping gear and the hunter’s sheep. “Now I don’t have any cartilage between my discs in my lower back.”

After 20 years of guiding in Montana, he hung up his license in 1986. He was 40 years old, had a pickup he still owed $6,000 on and no money in the bank. Yet he quickly transitioned to a new adventure, marrying Diana Wolff. Together they bought 86 acres in Wyoming and opened a guest ranch and started raising bucking bulls for the rodeo circuit.

Diana, 12 years his junior, said it’s a family joke that a month after getting married Bill took off on his honeymoon — without her — to hunt in Alaska for four weeks.

“Hunting is in Bill’s blood,” she said. “I knew who he was when I married him.”

Instead of children, they’ve raised a lot of livestock and dogs. That’s now dwindled down to three horses, three longhorn steers and six dogs.

Hard knocks

Bill even rode bulls for a while, but over a lifetime of active living, the injuries have added up. He’s torn the meniscus in both knees, has a 4-inch titanium rod and shoulder ball because he had dislocated it so much. He still carries around part of a .22 bullet in his shin after he dropped his Ruger Bearcat pistol which discharged and shot him. Then in 2013 he suffered a massive stroke.

“I was given the ‘wonder drug’ tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) which saved my life and left me with no ill effects of a stroke,” he wrote in a text.

But Diana said the doctor warned her before prescribing the medicine that there was also a chance Bill could bleed to death when given the drug. Although he was paralyzed on his left side and couldn’t talk in a way that Diana and the doctor could understand him, he agreed to risk trying the drug.

“That’s no life, not for a guy like Bill,” Diana said of the possibility that he might be permanently paralyzed. “Afterward, he got to thinking about it and said it was like riding a bucking bull. You nod your head and you might die before the ride is over.”

While being treated for the stroke, his doctor told him there was evidence of a previous stroke and that he “could die any day of another one.”

“I would say he’s more reflective on his life now,” Diana said. “He’s probably paying a little bit more attention to the things he wants to do.”

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Biggest elk
Butler had been scouting elk prior to the season but this big bull showed up much later. The bull is the largest Butler has ever shot.

Courtesy photo

Back in the saddle

Such a blunt confrontation with his mortality prompted Bill to lose weight, take dietary supplements and begin a daily regimen of walking.

“I’ve been walking all my life,” he said. And he competed in track when in high school.

It was Bill’s youthful brush with track that prompted him to enter the Big Sky State Games. In the last four years he’s won 29 medals, five gold medals in 2017 and in July set the pole vault record for his 70 to 74 age class — 4-feet-9 inches.

Bill and Diana both took instruction from Cody high school track coach Scott Shaffer in June to get tuned up for this year’s event. The pole vaulters were the oldest he’d ever taught, yet they easily mixed with their teenage counterparts.

“When I first found out about it I was kind of expecting a little wiry guy,” Shaffer said. “But then I saw him and thought, ‘Oh my god, I hope it’s not him cause he’s a huge dude!’”

Bill is 6-foot-3 and weighs in at 241 pounds.

New goals

Just like his verve for hunting, Bill took to pole vaulting with the same determination.

“I’m fairly competitive too,” Diana said. “If Bill wants to do something, he does it to the Nth degree.”

“He wanted to do 50 jumps, I wanted him to do five,” Shaffer said. “He wanted to come back the next day, I wanted him to wait a week.”

But waiting or taking things easy just isn’t in Bill’s DNA, whether he’s raising bulls or hunting, everything is full tilt and all in.

“He’s not one of those guys sitting on the couch getting old and watching TV,” Shaffer said. “He’s going toe to toe with Father Time every day.”

Diana agreed. Even though she was hesitant about letting Bill drive 750 miles to Mexico for last year’s mule deer hunt, and also to drive north about the same distance to hunt whitetails, she said it wouldn’t have been fair to ask him not to go.

“I was very worried, but I don’t want him sitting here in the rocking chair and dying,” she said. “I know he’d be a lot happier dying out in nature.”

Bill doesn’t envision himself kicking the bucket anytime soon. Instead, he’s set his eyes on the prize of setting records in the Big Sky State Games track and field events when he’s 90.

“The more intense you hunt the better you do,” Bill said. “It’s the same with anything.”

New wheelchair provides opportunities for quadriplegic hunter

http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/local-news/20170718/new-wheelchair-provides-opportunities-for-quadriplegic-hunter

Nels Hadden may not be able to move his arms or legs, but he can still take down a deer with a crossbow.

There’s no magic spell or use of the Force, just the power of technology that lets quadriplegic men and women do things that would have been impossible years ago.

Hadden was paralyzed from the neck down in 2009, when he stopped to help at the scene of a crash on Interstate 84 and was struck by another car that slid out of control on the ice. He lived in Milton-Freewater at the time and has since moved to Walla Walla.

On Tuesday the nonprofit Independence Fund gifted Hadden an upgraded wheelchair with 16-inch pneumatic wheels and four wheel drive that will allow him to roll across uneven terrain. He can’t wait to use it to hit the beach for the first time in more than eight years.

“This is going to give some of those things back that were taken away from me,” he said.

Hadden has always been able to move about and control a cell phone using puffs and sips of air into a straw near his mouth, but his other chairs have always been designed for flat, even surfaces.

One of the biggest things the all-terrain chair will help with is hunting. Hadden was an avid hunter before the accident, and still is today. He may not be able to hug his children or lift a spoon to his mouth, but a Walla Walla man named Gary Parson helped him obtain a contraption that mounts a rifle, shotgun or crossbow on his wheelchair and allows him to sight it and pull the trigger using puffs of air from his mouth.

He has been hunting in the years since, and has a few sets of antlers at home to show for it. In the past, he has had to more or less park his wheelchair in one spot and hope the right animal wandered past. Now he’ll be able to move through the forest with other hunters in a manner more reminiscent of when he was a younger.

“I grew up in Pilot Rock and my family, that’s just something that we did,” he said. “It’s not just about taking an animal, it’s about getting together and joking and laughing.”

Even when he was stuck sitting in a blind not too far from the wheelchair-accessible van, Hadden has had some adventures. One night he and his nurse Miranda Amwoka were sitting in the blind when a mama bear and her two cubs walked by. The mama bear came up against the side of the blind, stuck her head in and looked right in at the two of them. Since Hadden was strapped to a wheelchair and Amwoka didn’t have a weapon, it was a pretty scary experience for both of them.

Nels’ wife Betsy said he has more Twitter followers than anyone in the family after he gathered a fan club of hunters and hunting companies interested in his exploits. A couple of them even sent free game cameras for him to review. He has more than 40,000 game camera photos saved on his computer.

Betsy was the one who found out about the Independence Fund, a nonprofit that gives all-terrain wheelchairs and other tools to veterans injured in combat so that they can resume more of the outdoor activities they enjoyed before their injuries. Hadden wasn’t injured in combat, but he is a veteran who served nine years active duty and he was injured while acting as a Good Samaritan, so Betsy convinced him to take a shot at applying anyway. He received a letter saying that usually he would not be eligible, but there was a veteran in the area who had recently given one back because he only got to use it a couple of times before he fell too ill. The group was willing to give Hadden the used chair for free.

It wasn’t a simple matter of moving the chair from one part of Oregon to another. Each chair for a quadriplegic user must fit them “like a glove” in order to avoid pressure sores, and Hadden has even more needs because of the extent of the injuries he suffered during the accident. The chair was sent to a factory where it was customized to Hadden’s measurements and needs, but when Pete Hedberg of Pacific Healthcare Associates delivered it on Tuesday it still took an hour and a half of small adjustments before Hadden was lifted into it using a sling attached to an apparatus on the ceiling. Then it was another hour of adjustments aided by a tape measure to make sure his arms were resting at equal height.

“It takes longer than normal to sit him because he had so many bones broken,” Betsy said.

Still, Hadden was excited about the long-awaited chair, which resembles a shiny red miniature ATV on the bottom.

“Wow, she’s purdy,” he drawled as he laid eyes on the chair. “Pretty fancy.”

He commented on the lights and turn signals on the chair, joking, “Wal-Mart, here we come!”

Hadden doesn’t know the exact value of his new chair, but he does know that the less-fancy one he has been using cost $40,000. Buying a new wheelchair would have cost him more than buying a new car, he said. He can’t even begin to express how grateful he is to receive one for free.

“You rely on it every day because without it you’re in bed,” he said. “It’s basically like an arm or a leg.”

For more information about the Independence Fund, visit independencefund.org.

Man charged in hunting accident that killed sister-in-law pleads guilty

http://www.thelcn.com/lcn01/man-charged-in-hunting-accident-that-killed-sister-in-law-pleads-guilty-20170406

Hunter finds friendly deer wearing orange scarf for hunting

http://www.wilx.com/content/news/Hunter-finds-deer-wearing-404747255.html

On the day after Thanksgiving, Brian Powers grabbed his rifle and headed for some land east of Wausau. If not for his cell phone, Powers doubts anyone would believe what happened next. “All of a sudden here comes a deer and he has an orange scarf on. And he just kept walking and I said ‘oh my, he must be somebody’s pet or being fed by someone or being taken care of by somebody.” The color orange is commonly used to alert hunters not to shoot.

It wouldn’t be long before powers discovered he had a new friend. “Right when he got parallel on the logging road to where I was off the road, he stopped and turned and looked right at me and I said, ‘wow this is unbelievable,’ so then I called him over and he walked right in.”

With one hand filming the unlikely encounter, Powers gave the young buck a head rub. After about 10 minutes, the deer wandered off, but that afternoon as Powers was walking out of the woods, he returned, just in time to receive some friendly advice. “Keep your head low man, make sure people see that orange alright,” Powers said to the deer in his video recording. Since posting his video on Youtube, Powers story has spread all over the country.