Man Who Shot Two Dogs Ordered to Take Hunter Safety

A Dane County judge ordered an Evansville man who was charged with shooting two dogs to complete a hunter safety program.

35-year-old Kurt Rausch said he mistook the two dogs for coyotes, which he was hunting at night. The judge imposed and stayed a six-month jail sentence that Rausch will not have to serve if he completes the hunter safety program. Additionally, Rausch must pay a $2,500 fine.

According to reports, the judge said the case was “emotionally charged” and touched on the stupidity of night hunting. She noted she received about four-dozen letters regarding this case, more than any other case she has provided over.

Deanna Clark, the owner of the two dogs that were shot by Rausch and also a veterinarian in Lake Mills, said she was training the dogs around 6 p.m. that night in January 2016 for skijoring, a sport where dogs pull a cross-country skier. Both dogs were wearing reflective vests but were running loose. Rausch had set up a coyote call on public land and shot both dogs as they emerged from the underbrush.

Assistant District Attorney Paul Humphrey told the court Raush violated the cardinal rule of hunting and safety: know your target and what’s behind it. The dogs lived and despite the considerable vet bills, Clark told the court she didn’t want restitution or Rausch to be punished. Instead, she wants the Legislature to end hunting at night on public lands.

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Inside the grim scene of a Korean dog meat farm, just miles from the Winter Olympics


MARTIN ROGERS  |  USA TODAY SPORTS

WONJU, South Korea – A short drive from the burning Olympic torch and the excited throng of Winter Games spectators, there was no cheering outside the place where hundreds of dogs are packed in cages until they are killed for their meat.

In the rural region of Wonju, down a winding country lane, sits a farm that provides dog meat to some of the thousands of South Korean restaurants where patrons order things such as dog salad, dog ribs, dog stew and dog hot pot.

The grim surroundings of the farm pains the senses. The first thing to be noticed is the sound, pitiful whines and yelps of about 300 animals being kept in filthy cages until their execution.

Step closer and the stench fills the nostrils, a sickening waft that spreads over two long rows of cramped cages.

Some of the dogs do not survive long enough to be slaughtered. Lying discarded on the mud floor by the plastic awning, the carcass of a dead Tosa – a rare breed that originated in Japan. Also in the cages were Jindos, St. Bernards and golden Labradors.

Most were emaciated. Many had gaps in their fur where huge sores grew on their bodies. The cages are elevated, set up so dog feces drops through gaps in the wire bottom, collecting in huge piles beneath.

More: Olympics shine spotlight on dog meat trade in South Korea

USA TODAY video journalist Sandy Hooper and myself filmed the gruesome scene for 15 minutes on Saturday morning, using GoPros and iPhones. When we approached the front of the property in an attempt to speak to the owners, a man screamed in Korean: “Turn it off, otherwise I’m going to throw it down!”

The Winter Olympics is supposed to be one giant commercial for South Korea and its winter tourism industry, but no public relations effort can cast a favorable light on the Korean dog meat industry. Pyeongchang organizing officials were aware enough of the likely international reaction to Korean dog meat eating practices that they paid nearby restaurants to take down signs advertising the product’s availability and pleaded with them to take it off the menu – at least during the Olympics.

It didn’t work. Two miles from Jinbu station, the main hub serving the primary mountain cluster of the Games, a trio of restaurants openly served dog products. They had amended their frontage signs to remove the word “bosintang” (dog meat stew) and promote goat meat instead, but that was only outside.

Walk inside and glance up at the giant white board and the first four menu items, in English and Korean, are derived from man’s best friend. An elderly Korean man removed his shoes, entered the room, ordered the stew and sat down at a row of tables on the floor. Soon, he was served the thick brown concoction and began slurping down the soup until it was all gone.

In Korean culture, dog meat is said to have mythical properties that boost restorative powers and increase virility. Fearing a backlash from traditionalists, the Korean government won’t amend the law, despite president Moon Jae-In having adopted a dog saved from the meat industry.

Pyeongchang organizers wish government officials would take action.

“We are aware of the international concern around the consumption of dog meat in Korea,” an organizing committee statement read. “This is a matter which the government should address. We hope that this issue will not impact on the delivery or reputation of the Games and the province and we will support the work of the province and government on this topic as needed. Also, dog meat will not be served at any Games venue.”

Eating dog meat is a custom here and it is hard to dispute that. In the United States millions of animals of countless varieties are slaughtered each year for meat. To some, the plight of Korean dogs is scarcely any different to that of American chicken, cows or pigs. To others, there is something vastly different about a dog, given its relationship to humans.

Activists in Korea don’t like the use of dogs for meat but mainly focus their protest efforts on the methods of killing the animals and their conditions in captivity.

“If the Korean people stop eating dog meat there will not be the market for it,” Kim Jun-Won, president of the Dasom animal rights organization said, fighting back tears when shown photographs of our footage as we returned to our vehicle. “But this is wrong and it breaks my heart. The people who keep animals this way and kill them? They are the devil.”

Demand is decreasing, with dog meat meals not particularly popular with younger members of Korean society. As well as the one described above, USA TODAY Sports visited two other farms in the area that showed signs of being operational recently. Both were closed, with the dried feces and even bones of deceased dogs still visible.

“The problem is that while smaller facilities close due to lack of business, larger, better organized ones are popping up,” Kiana Kang, director of programs and special projects of American non-profit rescue organization Animal Hope and Wellness said. “This is the two Koreas. There is the beauty and the culture, and then there is this.”

Korean dog farmers claim their sole intention is to try to make a living and insist the animals are the same as livestock.

A group of Winter Olympic athletes, including Canadian figure skater Meagan Duhamel, freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy and snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis took part in a recent public service announcement in a bid to raise awareness about the Korean dog meat trade. Duhamel already owns a rescue Korean dog.

The United States and Canada are leaders in trying to rescue Korean dogs and provide them with a new life. In a recent USA TODAY Sports interview, Californian couple Lana Chung Peck and her husband Kevin Peck described how many of the animals they foster and rehabilitate through the Save Korean Dogs organization have significant issues.

Chung Peck said her dogs cannot initially walk properly on grass or firm ground, because most of their lives had previously been spent in the cages, scrambling to get firm footing on the hard thin metal.

Meanwhile, at the Games, the first medals were being doled out. The plight of Korea’s dogs isn’t going to be the major narrative of the Games, the events themselves and the lingering political turmoil dominate the headlines.

But it is here, happening not far from the Olympics, and it’s tough to stomach.

Dog Meat Still on the Menu at South Korea Olympics

A handful of South Korean restaurants near the venues of the Winter Olympics are defying a government push to take dog meat off menus for the duration of the games, Channel News Asia reported.

The opening ceremony takes place on Friday in Pyeongchang county, with athletes from over 90 countries and tens of thousands of tourists from  South Korea and abroad expected to flock to the region. In a bid to avoid controversy over the culinary customs of eating dog meat, local authorities have tried to curb the serving of canine delicacies by offering nearby restaurants subsidies to temporarily alter their menus.

Related: U.S. war with North Korea would be a catastrophe, says Russia

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But only a small minority appear to have taken up the government on the offer, Pyeongchang County government official Lee Yong-bae told AFP.

“We’ve faced a lot of complaints from restaurant operators that we are threatening their livelihood,” he said. Of the 12 dog meat restaurants in the county, only two have complied, Lee said on Thursday. According to him, a handful entertained agreeing to scrap dog meat from the menu but have already seen a drop in sales.

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Puppies are seen in a cage at a dog meat market in Yulin, in China’s southern Guangxi region on June 21, 2017. China’s most notorious dog meat festival opened in Yulin on June 21, 2017, with butchers hacking slabs of canines and cooks frying the flesh following rumours that authorities would impose a ban this year. STR/AFP/Getty Images

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“Some of them initially shifted to selling pork or things instead of dog meat only to find their sales plunging sharply,” he said. “They then switched back to dog meat.”

Signage advertizing dog meat dishes has nonetheless become less prominent, as the restaurants are seeking to avoid giving “a bad impression to foreigners” during the Games, he added.

The custom of treating dogs as livestock and using them for sustenance is increasingly becoming a taboo in South Korea, with the country’s government branding them a “detestable” kind of meat. There are, however, no explicit legal punishments for the cooking of dog meat and a minority of South Koreans still do so.

Last year, authorities closed Moran market in Seongnam, the largest dog meat venue, which sold over  80,000 dogs a year. It accounted for about a third of South Korea’s dog meat consumption, according to local media estimates.

This article was first written by Newsweek

Meigs County man charged in operating ‘bearbaiting’ event

https://www.10tv.com/article/meigs-county-man-charged-operating-bearbaiting-event

Clinton J. Bailey. (Photo/Meigs County Sheriff)
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MEIGS COUNTY — A Meigs County man has been charged after the sheriff said he was suspected to have been operating a “bearbaiting” event.

Clinton J. Bailey, 51, is charged with 16 counts in connection with the event, three of which are unclassified felonies for animal fighting.

He also has two fourth-degree misdemeanor charges for animal fighting, two misdemeanor charges for falsification and nine dangerous animal misdemeanor charges.

He was arraigned on Jan. 24 and released on a personal recognizance bond, according to Meigs County Common Pleas Court online court records. His next appearance will be Feb. 26.

In November, the Ohio Department of Agriculture Enforcement Division executed a search warrant on Bush Road in Long Bottom, according to the Meigs County Sheriff. Bailey owned a bear and possessed a Dangerous Wild Animal Permit.

At that location, Bailey is alleged to have been operating a “bearbaiting” event whereby several hunting dogs were released inside an enclosure, attacking the bear. Officers received information Bailey was charging admission of $20 per dog to participate.

In addition to Bailey, and his juvenile son, seven males, two females and eight children were present at the event with the majority of participants being from West Virginia.

At least one child was observed inside an unapproved enclosure while dogs were attacking the loose bear. Two of the males had handguns.

Bearbaiting is defined under Animal Fights, Section 959.15 of the Ohio Revised Code.

Assistance was provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office Drone Team, who obtained significant video footage of the illegal activity as well as the Washington County and Jackson County Sheriff’s Offices who provided tactical assistance.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources and Ohio State Highway Patrol provided significant assistance as well.

The bear was seized pursuant to the warrant by DWA program personnel.

Dog shoots owner to death in freak hunting accident

https://nypost.com/2018/01/22/dog-shoots-owner-to-death-in-freak-hunting-accident/

A Russian hunter was shot dead by his own dog when the excited pooch hopped up on his lap and tapped his shotgun — which discharged into his gut.

The freak accident struck while Sergei Terekhov, 64, and his brother were hunting rabbits in the remote Saratov region, according to reports Monday.

Terekhov’s double-barrelled shotgun was resting on his knee when his Estonian Hound bounded towards him and bumped the weapon with his paw, causing it to go off, according to the local news site Region 64 and other outlets.

“The weapon rested on his knee, with the butt facing down and the barrel pointing towards his stomach,” investigator Alexander Galanin told the site.

The investigative committee later told Newsweek Terekhov was holding the Soviet Toz-3, which discharged after the pooch darted from a car and hopped up onto him.

Terekhov’s brother called an ambulance but he died on the way to a hospital.

Terekhov was experienced hunter with a license, Galanin said. “Everything was in order. It was an accident.”

Terekhov’s was a sportsman who loved hunting rabbits and other game, the UK Telegraph reported.

Investigators had found no sign of foul play on Monday.

Two dogs survive vicious attack by hunting dogs on hiking trail

http://www.kitv.com/story/36135809/two-dogs-survive-vicious-mauling-by-hunting-dogs-on-hiking-trail#.Wl_a3z4DQbQ.facebook

Aug 14, 2017 11:32 PM PDTUpdated: Sep 04, 2017 11:39 PM PDT

 

A leisurely hike in Aina Haina went terribly wrong for one family.

An East O’ahu man said his two dogs were viciously attacked by hunting dogs.

Andres Gonzalo was hiking an Aina Haina trail with his dogs Lilikoi and Phoenix last Sunday.  He and his friends stopped on the trail to take a break.  Then he says out of nowhere, eight dogs came from behind.

“I had just enough time to hold my boxer and my friend picked up the small one. It was too late. The dogs were just grabbing the dogs by the neck and by the ears.” Said Gonzalo.

About a minute later, Gonzalo said two hunters showed up and restrained the dogs before disappearing.

Lilikoi bolted from the scene, but was found later on.  She suffered bite wounds resulting in 50 stitches.

“They had mauled her inside and out. Her legs, we didn’t know the extent of it until she went to the ER and they found all her intestines were perforated.  So they had to operate on that.” Said Miki Gonzalo, Andres’ wife.

They hope their story serves as a reminder that hunters should be held accountable for their dogs.

Island News spoke to the hunter who says he’s truly sorry for what happened.

Instead of pressing charges, Gonzalo and the owner of the hunting dogs have come to an agreement.

“We’re going to create an event. It would be part of their family and my family, my friends and their friends. We’re going to do a cookout or something just to get some funds.” Explained Gonzalo.

Those funds will help cover over $4,000 worth of vet expenses. The Gonzalo’s have also created a GoFundMe page https://www.gofundme.com/vet-funds-for-Lilikoi.

State hunting rules say hunters are responsible for all actions of their dogs when hunting legally.

Dogs should be kept under physical restraint and control at all times, except when actively pursuing game.

The Division of Forestry and Wildlife reminds hikers that they are more likely to encounter hunting dogs when hiking in areas that allow hunting.

These dogs are taking on wildlife trafficking in Botswana

http://www.awf.org/blog/these-dogs-are-taking-wildlife-trafficking-botswana

Photo of sniffer dog and handler team demonstrating ivory detection on vehicle

 

Up to 130,000 elephants roam the wild lands of Botswana – and that is not counting transient herds moving across country boundaries in the region. As a significant range state, Botswana was the only nation in southern Africa to support a total and permanent ban on the ivory trade at the 2016 CITES conference.

The country made another landmark contribution to the continent’s mission to protect keystone wildlife species in November, when 15 of Botswana’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks rangers graduated from African Wildlife Foundation’s Canines for Conservation program.

Following almost two-and-a-half months of intensive training led by the program’s director, Will Powell, the new canine handlers and 10 ivory detection dogs will supplement anti-poaching efforts on the ground. They will be deployed to strategic airports, roads, and border crossings to stop the trafficking of illegal wildlife products through Botswana.

Botswana tackles wildlife trafficking head on

Previously, the country had lobbied with its neighbors to reintroduce limited ivory sales from countries with sustainably managed herds. After the spike in poaching and smuggling after a one-off sale in 2008, Botswana is now addressing illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade through innovative collaborations with other range states.

The Canines for Conservation graduation ceremony held at the training center in Usa River, Tanzania was graced by senior management from Botswana’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks, Tanzania National Parks, Tanzania Wildlife Authority, Ngorongoro Conservation Area Authority, Manyara Ranch Conservancy, the College of African Wildlife Management, Mweka, and conservation organization, TRAFFIC.

AWF’s Vice President of Species Conservation, Dr. Philip Muruthi, commended Botswana’s wildlife protection authority for developing the capacity of their rangers and law enforcement officers. He explained that this development is critical in sealing previously existing loopholes that were exploited by criminal networks to traffic ivory from poaching hotspots like Mozambique.

Photo of sniffer dog and handler trained through AWF's Canines for Conservation

 

Conservation needs connections across species

For Powell, who has trained robust handler-and-sniffer-dog teams that have intercepted millions of dollars’ worth of rhino horn, ivory, and pangolin scales, stopping the trafficking of wildlife products is not just a numbers game. The effectiveness of this conservation strategy depends on the bond between handler and sniffer dog.

Botswanan ranger and freshly qualified sniffer dog handler, Tebogo Mangombe, knows that anti-trafficking initiatives are needed urgently in her country. She reveals how the training has added an edge to her work as a custodian of Africa’s wildlife — and a special companion in her life.

Why is Canines for Conservation important to you?

We have a lot of wildlife and we must protect them for future generations. Saving wildlife means saving our lives too – our livelihoods depend on how we take care of our flora and fauna. The training on handling the detection dogs was enriching and I hope to apply the expertise gained after the course to fight poaching in my country more effectively.

How was it when you met your dog for the first time?

It was challenging because I did not know how to handle him initially but later I realized he could do a lot more. One of the best moments of training was after the first month when I was able to relate better with my dog. He is loving, energetic and happy. He is my best friend — I love him so much because I have a very special connection with him.

What is the best lesson you learned during training?

Just the overall experience of being a dog handler and using that skill to fight poaching is a big achievement for me. I was previously in the anti-poaching unit — now this canine unit is my life. I cannot imagine myself doing anything else at this point in time. We are going back home with the goal of ending this organized crime.

>Learn more about the AWF-trained Canine Detection Unit deployed in Tanzania.

Dog shoots man in Iowa hunting accident

https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/2017/11/30/dog-shoots-man-iowa-hunting-accident/908928001/

Iowa DNR Conservation Officer Aron Arthur discusses new state law that allow straight wall cartridge rifles for deer hunting.

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A dog stepped on a 12-gauge shotgun causing bird shot pellets to hit a man hunting in southwestern Wright County Wednesday.

William Rancourt, 36, of Lebanon, New Hampshire, was nearly 22 yards away when a hunting dog stepped on the trigger guard of a shotgun lying on the ground causing it to discharge, according to a news release from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. 

Rancourt was hit in the back and sustained injuries considered non-life threatening, but still “fairly moderate,” said Ken Lonneman, a DNR conservation officer.

Rancourt was conscious, alert and able to walk when he was transported to Trinity Hospital in Fort Dodge. As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, X-rays were being performed to ensure all pellets had been removed from his back, Lonneman said.

“Shotguns are extremely dangerous at close range,” Lonneman said. “In this case, there was a good distance between the muzzle and the wound, but if the victim had been closer, his injuries would have been more severe.”

 Rancourt and his party — which included two dogs, two Iowans and another man from New Hampshire — had been pheasant hunting in the Boone River Greenbelt Conservation Board Public Hunting Area at about 1:20 p.m. when one of the men placed his shotgun on the ground without unloading.

The incident acts a good reminder to all hunters to both unload and double check the safety before putting any guns down or leaving them unattended, Lonneman said.

With shotgun deer season starting Saturday, the DNR cautions hunters that grounds will be busy this weekend.

“I would like to remind all hunters that no matter what season it is, but especially during a busy season like the one we are going into, to please be sure to identify your target as well as what’s beyond your target before firing,” Lonneman said.

If someone is hurt while on a public hunting ground, Lonneman said hunters should call for medical assistance right away and notify the local sheriff’s office.

For more information on hunting in Iowa, visit IowaDNR.gov.

Tonka’s Law, named for dog shot by hunter, unveiled on Facebook

READINGTON TWP. — When Elizabeth Mongno’s dog was killed after being mistakenly shot by a crossbow hunter, she wished for legislation to help avoid this from happening again.

After working with state Sen. Raymond Lesniak (D-20th), she may be getting just that.

Lesniak will be hosting a Facebook live press conference at the Mongno’s home on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. to announce Tonka’s Law, named after the Mongno’s 1-year-old Alaskan Shepard, who killed by an arrow in September.

Tonka was killed less than 100 feet from Mongno’s property line when the dog ran after deer and was mistaken as a coyote by a hunter who had been given permission to be on a nearby property by a neighbor. The hunter apologized to the family and is facing charges.

The bill will change the current law to increase the buffer between hunting and residential properties from 150 to 450 feet.

The current law was put in place in 2010, when the buffer was decreased from 450 feet, a decision Lesniak voted against.

“It was a big mistake, we recognized it then, but often times tragedies have to happen before it’s recognized by the legislature or the governor,” he said.

Dog who stayed by dead pup's side is rescued

Dog who stayed by dead pup’s side is rescued

Dog taken to area shelter.

Because the legislation passed overwhelmingly in 2010, Lesniak said it’s important for constituents to contact their elected officials to support Tonka’s Law.

The bill, co-sponsored with state Sen. Kip Batemen (R-16th), will not only attempt to put the original law back in place, but also provide better notice to property owners when hunting is going on near them, he said.

“People can give, and do give, permission for hunters to use their property. People living there aren’t aware of the nearness and the need to take extra precaution,” he said.

The Facebook live will include a Q&A session from residents invited to the home and from commenters on Facebook. Lesniak said he will answer any issue regarding the protection of pets and animals.

Lesniak wanted to present the bill over Facebook live because the House is out of session, and he wanted to announce it before session began.

“We certainly want to avoid any more tragedies like poor Tonka being killed,” he said.

“We miss Tonka so much,” Mongno said in a Facebook post. “Hopefully some good changes will come from this.”

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FElizabethMongno%2Fposts%2F10155884524392147&width=500

Discarded Greyhounds Imprisoned, Neglected, and Farmed for Their Blood/Getting every last drop from greyhounds

http://www.ohmidog.com/2017/10/11/getting-every-last-drop-greyhounds/

As if racing their hearts out weren’t enough, some greyhounds are retired to dog blood banks where they lived caged all day long, except for outings to get their blood drawn.

PETA last month exposed one such kennel, The Pet Blood Bank, Inc., in Cherokee, Texas, which houses about 150 retired greyhounds — solely for the purpose of extracting and selling their blood and blood products.

The products, PETA reported, are distributed by Patterson Veterinary Supply, Inc., which did about $3 billion worth of business in 2016.

After the the PETA expose and a story in The Washington Post, Patterson Veterinary Supply announced it would take steps to correct the horrible conditions they described.

bloodbankBut PETA says no steps have been taken, even after they had Paul McCartney send a pleato the company.

Patterson Veterinary Supply initially announced it would terminate business with the The Pet Blood Bank, Inc.

It also promised to support “efforts to ensure that the animals receive appropriate care.” Bu PETA says it has seen no evidence of any such efforts.

The whistle-blower was Bill Larsen, 60, a former employee of the blood bank who went back to work there and was horrified by how conditions had deteriorated.

Larsen, who took the incriminating photos, said he unsuccessfully sought help from local animal shelters and a state agency before contacting PETA. “I just like dogs,” he said, and “hate for any animal to get treated like that.”

The photos show kenneled dogs with open wounds, rotting teeth and toenails curling into their paw pads.

The blood bank was founded in 2004 by Austin entrepreneur Mark Ziller, who said he initially sought volunteers and used a bloodmobile. When that did not turn up enough dogs, the company began using retired greyhounds housed in a kennel on a private farm northwest of Austin, the Post reported.

Ziller said he sold the company in November 2015 to Shane Altizer, whose family owns the farm in Cherokee.

“The Pet Blood Bank had a noble mission: It provided blood for veterinarians to use in lifesaving transfusions,” Ziller tod the Post. After viewing the photos PETA obtained, he added, “To see the animals in that state is beyond depressing.”

Altizer did not deny that the images were taken there, but said they predated his 2015 purchase of the company or were “moment snapshots” unrepresentative of overall conditions now.

Blood banks help save thousands of animals a year, but they are also profit-driven and unregulated.

With more medical procedures being used by vets, transfusions are more often required, and animal blood banks struggle to meet the demand. Only one state, California, regulates such operations and requires annual inspections.

bloodbank2Greyhounds are considered especially desirable as donors because they typically have a universal blood type and have big neck veins that make drawing blood easy.

Veterinarian Anne Hale, former CEO of the nation’s first and largest commercial animal blood bank, said she visited the Pet Blood Bank this summer and was “pleasantly surprised” with conditions there. After viewing the PETA photos and video though, she said, “It appears that the facility was ‘cleaned up’ before our touring … I agree that this facility should be addressed. This certainly suggests that regional, state and/or federal regulation is warranted.”

Former Beatle McCartney, who wrote a letter on PETA’s behalf, wants to see all the dogs removed from the facility.

“I have had dogs since I was a boy and loved them all dearly, including Martha who was my companion for about 15 years and about whom I wrote the song ‘Martha, My Dear,’” McCartney wrote. “I join my friends at PETA in asking you to pay these greyhounds back, and to let them retire from the dirt-floored, barren conditions in which they are kept isolated and alone.”

(Photos and video from PETA)

Also see:  https://investigations.peta.org/greyhounds-farmed-for-blood/

Discarded Greyhounds Imprisoned, Neglected, and Farmed for Their Blood

Imprisoned in an old turkey shed are approximately 150 perpetually penned greyhounds—many already used, abused, and discarded by the notorious dog racing industry—who neurotically spin in circles, jump up and down, cry out, and hide in the jagged old chemical tanks that serve as their only shelter.

VIDEOTAKE ACTION

At a kennel doing business as The Pet Blood Bank, Inc., in Cherokee, Texas, these animals, who’ve already endured lifelong deprivation, are now being exploited for blood products, most of which are distributed by Patterson Veterinary Supply, Inc., a corporate giant with sales of nearly $3 billion in 2016 alone.
Update: On September 22, 2017, one day after PETA exposed the blood farm, Patterson Veterinary Supply announced that “the conditions and treatment described and pictured … are horrific and unacceptable. … We have terminated business with [The Pet Blood Bank, Inc.], and we will work to support … efforts to ensure that the animals receive appropriate care.”
But for nearly a week, Patterson Veterinary Supply ignored questions about the specific ways in which it would assist the dogs. Then, on September 28, 2017, this multibillion-dollar company, which had pledged—in writing—to help the dogs, posted this cop out on a webpage created just a day earlier, which has nothing on it but this disappointing and unacceptable statement.

 

Solitary Confinement, Severe Deprivation

With few exceptions, the greyhounds are solitarily confined in unsanitary dirt-floored wire cages devoid of any form of enrichment.

They are deprived of everything that is natural and meaningful to them, including exercise, companionship, and the opportunity to bond with a human family. Out of boredom and despair, they just dig and chew on the old filthy chemical tanks that serve as their shelter, leaving sharp and jagged edges that sometimes injure them. Some dogs pace, spin endlessly in circles, jump up and down, and cry out when approached. Others are so terrified that they cower and lose control of their bladder or bowels.