Dog shoots man in Iowa hunting accident

https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/2017/11/30/dog-shoots-man-iowa-hunting-accident/908928001/

Iowa DNR Conservation Officer Aron Arthur discusses new state law that allow straight wall cartridge rifles for deer hunting.

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A dog stepped on a 12-gauge shotgun causing bird shot pellets to hit a man hunting in southwestern Wright County Wednesday.

William Rancourt, 36, of Lebanon, New Hampshire, was nearly 22 yards away when a hunting dog stepped on the trigger guard of a shotgun lying on the ground causing it to discharge, according to a news release from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. 

Rancourt was hit in the back and sustained injuries considered non-life threatening, but still “fairly moderate,” said Ken Lonneman, a DNR conservation officer.

Rancourt was conscious, alert and able to walk when he was transported to Trinity Hospital in Fort Dodge. As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, X-rays were being performed to ensure all pellets had been removed from his back, Lonneman said.

“Shotguns are extremely dangerous at close range,” Lonneman said. “In this case, there was a good distance between the muzzle and the wound, but if the victim had been closer, his injuries would have been more severe.”

 Rancourt and his party — which included two dogs, two Iowans and another man from New Hampshire — had been pheasant hunting in the Boone River Greenbelt Conservation Board Public Hunting Area at about 1:20 p.m. when one of the men placed his shotgun on the ground without unloading.

The incident acts a good reminder to all hunters to both unload and double check the safety before putting any guns down or leaving them unattended, Lonneman said.

With shotgun deer season starting Saturday, the DNR cautions hunters that grounds will be busy this weekend.

“I would like to remind all hunters that no matter what season it is, but especially during a busy season like the one we are going into, to please be sure to identify your target as well as what’s beyond your target before firing,” Lonneman said.

If someone is hurt while on a public hunting ground, Lonneman said hunters should call for medical assistance right away and notify the local sheriff’s office.

For more information on hunting in Iowa, visit IowaDNR.gov.

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Tonka’s Law, named for dog shot by hunter, unveiled on Facebook

READINGTON TWP. — When Elizabeth Mongno’s dog was killed after being mistakenly shot by a crossbow hunter, she wished for legislation to help avoid this from happening again.

After working with state Sen. Raymond Lesniak (D-20th), she may be getting just that.

Lesniak will be hosting a Facebook live press conference at the Mongno’s home on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. to announce Tonka’s Law, named after the Mongno’s 1-year-old Alaskan Shepard, who killed by an arrow in September.

Tonka was killed less than 100 feet from Mongno’s property line when the dog ran after deer and was mistaken as a coyote by a hunter who had been given permission to be on a nearby property by a neighbor. The hunter apologized to the family and is facing charges.

The bill will change the current law to increase the buffer between hunting and residential properties from 150 to 450 feet.

The current law was put in place in 2010, when the buffer was decreased from 450 feet, a decision Lesniak voted against.

“It was a big mistake, we recognized it then, but often times tragedies have to happen before it’s recognized by the legislature or the governor,” he said.

Dog who stayed by dead pup's side is rescued

Dog who stayed by dead pup’s side is rescued

Dog taken to area shelter.

Because the legislation passed overwhelmingly in 2010, Lesniak said it’s important for constituents to contact their elected officials to support Tonka’s Law.

The bill, co-sponsored with state Sen. Kip Batemen (R-16th), will not only attempt to put the original law back in place, but also provide better notice to property owners when hunting is going on near them, he said.

“People can give, and do give, permission for hunters to use their property. People living there aren’t aware of the nearness and the need to take extra precaution,” he said.

The Facebook live will include a Q&A session from residents invited to the home and from commenters on Facebook. Lesniak said he will answer any issue regarding the protection of pets and animals.

Lesniak wanted to present the bill over Facebook live because the House is out of session, and he wanted to announce it before session began.

“We certainly want to avoid any more tragedies like poor Tonka being killed,” he said.

“We miss Tonka so much,” Mongno said in a Facebook post. “Hopefully some good changes will come from this.”

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FElizabethMongno%2Fposts%2F10155884524392147&width=500

Discarded Greyhounds Imprisoned, Neglected, and Farmed for Their Blood/Getting every last drop from greyhounds

http://www.ohmidog.com/2017/10/11/getting-every-last-drop-greyhounds/

As if racing their hearts out weren’t enough, some greyhounds are retired to dog blood banks where they lived caged all day long, except for outings to get their blood drawn.

PETA last month exposed one such kennel, The Pet Blood Bank, Inc., in Cherokee, Texas, which houses about 150 retired greyhounds — solely for the purpose of extracting and selling their blood and blood products.

The products, PETA reported, are distributed by Patterson Veterinary Supply, Inc., which did about $3 billion worth of business in 2016.

After the the PETA expose and a story in The Washington Post, Patterson Veterinary Supply announced it would take steps to correct the horrible conditions they described.

bloodbankBut PETA says no steps have been taken, even after they had Paul McCartney send a pleato the company.

Patterson Veterinary Supply initially announced it would terminate business with the The Pet Blood Bank, Inc.

It also promised to support “efforts to ensure that the animals receive appropriate care.” Bu PETA says it has seen no evidence of any such efforts.

The whistle-blower was Bill Larsen, 60, a former employee of the blood bank who went back to work there and was horrified by how conditions had deteriorated.

Larsen, who took the incriminating photos, said he unsuccessfully sought help from local animal shelters and a state agency before contacting PETA. “I just like dogs,” he said, and “hate for any animal to get treated like that.”

The photos show kenneled dogs with open wounds, rotting teeth and toenails curling into their paw pads.

The blood bank was founded in 2004 by Austin entrepreneur Mark Ziller, who said he initially sought volunteers and used a bloodmobile. When that did not turn up enough dogs, the company began using retired greyhounds housed in a kennel on a private farm northwest of Austin, the Post reported.

Ziller said he sold the company in November 2015 to Shane Altizer, whose family owns the farm in Cherokee.

“The Pet Blood Bank had a noble mission: It provided blood for veterinarians to use in lifesaving transfusions,” Ziller tod the Post. After viewing the photos PETA obtained, he added, “To see the animals in that state is beyond depressing.”

Altizer did not deny that the images were taken there, but said they predated his 2015 purchase of the company or were “moment snapshots” unrepresentative of overall conditions now.

Blood banks help save thousands of animals a year, but they are also profit-driven and unregulated.

With more medical procedures being used by vets, transfusions are more often required, and animal blood banks struggle to meet the demand. Only one state, California, regulates such operations and requires annual inspections.

bloodbank2Greyhounds are considered especially desirable as donors because they typically have a universal blood type and have big neck veins that make drawing blood easy.

Veterinarian Anne Hale, former CEO of the nation’s first and largest commercial animal blood bank, said she visited the Pet Blood Bank this summer and was “pleasantly surprised” with conditions there. After viewing the PETA photos and video though, she said, “It appears that the facility was ‘cleaned up’ before our touring … I agree that this facility should be addressed. This certainly suggests that regional, state and/or federal regulation is warranted.”

Former Beatle McCartney, who wrote a letter on PETA’s behalf, wants to see all the dogs removed from the facility.

“I have had dogs since I was a boy and loved them all dearly, including Martha who was my companion for about 15 years and about whom I wrote the song ‘Martha, My Dear,’” McCartney wrote. “I join my friends at PETA in asking you to pay these greyhounds back, and to let them retire from the dirt-floored, barren conditions in which they are kept isolated and alone.”

(Photos and video from PETA)

Also see:  https://investigations.peta.org/greyhounds-farmed-for-blood/

Discarded Greyhounds Imprisoned, Neglected, and Farmed for Their Blood

Imprisoned in an old turkey shed are approximately 150 perpetually penned greyhounds—many already used, abused, and discarded by the notorious dog racing industry—who neurotically spin in circles, jump up and down, cry out, and hide in the jagged old chemical tanks that serve as their only shelter.

VIDEOTAKE ACTION

At a kennel doing business as The Pet Blood Bank, Inc., in Cherokee, Texas, these animals, who’ve already endured lifelong deprivation, are now being exploited for blood products, most of which are distributed by Patterson Veterinary Supply, Inc., a corporate giant with sales of nearly $3 billion in 2016 alone.
Update: On September 22, 2017, one day after PETA exposed the blood farm, Patterson Veterinary Supply announced that “the conditions and treatment described and pictured … are horrific and unacceptable. … We have terminated business with [The Pet Blood Bank, Inc.], and we will work to support … efforts to ensure that the animals receive appropriate care.”
But for nearly a week, Patterson Veterinary Supply ignored questions about the specific ways in which it would assist the dogs. Then, on September 28, 2017, this multibillion-dollar company, which had pledged—in writing—to help the dogs, posted this cop out on a webpage created just a day earlier, which has nothing on it but this disappointing and unacceptable statement.

 

Solitary Confinement, Severe Deprivation

With few exceptions, the greyhounds are solitarily confined in unsanitary dirt-floored wire cages devoid of any form of enrichment.

They are deprived of everything that is natural and meaningful to them, including exercise, companionship, and the opportunity to bond with a human family. Out of boredom and despair, they just dig and chew on the old filthy chemical tanks that serve as their shelter, leaving sharp and jagged edges that sometimes injure them. Some dogs pace, spin endlessly in circles, jump up and down, and cry out when approached. Others are so terrified that they cower and lose control of their bladder or bowels.

 

A crossbow hunter thought he shot a coyote. It was a family dog named Tonka

 September 23 at 2:46 PM

Tonka, a 1-year-old Alaskan shepherd, sleeps next to James Mongno, 9, and Lauren Mongno, 3. Tonka died Sept. 20 after a hunter mistook him for a coyote and shot him. (Courtesy of Elizabeth Mongno)

Elizabeth Mongno was walking Tonka around her wooded property in rural New Jersey when the 1-year-old dog spotted a deer and decided to chase it.

Tonka liked to roam free on the 3-to-4-acre parcel of land divided among a handful of homeowners, and he usually came back within seconds. But when he dashed into the woods Wednesday evening, he didn’t return. She screamed for Tonka to come back, and about 30 seconds after her dog took off, she heard a yelp. She knew Tonka was hurt, and thought he had been bitten by another animal.

About 10 minutes later, her husband found Tonka on the ground about 50 feet from their property line. He’d been shot directly in the heart with an arrow. Tonka tried to walk home, Mongno said, but he didn’t make it.

“It didn’t occur to me that there’s a hunter in the woods,” Mongno told The Washington Post. “I started screaming.”

Police said Tonka was killed by a crossbow hunter who mistook the 95-pound Alaskan shepherd with white and gray fur for a coyote chasing a deer. The hunter, Romeo Antonucci, was licensed to hunt and was within the proper distance from houses when he fired, police said. But Antonucci has been charged with careless discharge of a weapon and damage to property. (In this case, Tonka is considered property, a spokesman for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection told NJ.com.)

Antonucci, of Kenilworth, N.J., did not respond to requests for comment.

Bowhunters in New Jersey are allowed to hunt deer as long as they are 150 feet from residences. The state legislature passed a bill in 2010 to shorten the minimum distance requirement from 450 feet to 150 feet, in an effort to curb the deer population.

Tonka sits on the couch with James Mongno. (Elizabeth Mongno)

State law also allows hunters to shoot coyotes. Only bows are allowed during the fall hunting season, which began this month. Firearms and bows are permitted from November to March.

Mongno said Antonucci is a relative of one of her neighbors, who gave him permission to hunt on their property, which is not far from Mongno’s. She said she and the other neighbors should’ve been made aware that somebody was hunting on the property, which is dotted with five houses, so that they knew to be more careful.

“We didn’t know that there was anybody hunting. . . . Children played in those woods,” Mongno said. “It didn’t even occur to us that anybody would even hunt there because it’s a small piece of property.”

Mongno said she is not against hunting. Though she doesn’t hunt, her husband is an avid hunter.

“If the rule is 150 feet, and that is what it is, that’s fine,” she said. “But we have the right to know if somebody is hunting in the property adjacent to us. . . . It never occurred to us that we needed to have hunting laws for our back yard.”

Tonka, an Alaskan shepherd, with  Lauren Mongno. (Courtesy of Elizabeth Mongno)

She also criticized Antonucci for mistaking her dog for a coyote.

“If he couldn’t tell the difference between a dog and a coyote, he should not have a weapon. . . . You need to know your target,” she said.

Mongno’s family got Tonka last year, when he was still a puppy. The beloved dog had become Mongno’s third child and her little boy’s best friend.

“I will never forgive myself for letting him get away from me. My poor kids couldn’t be more broken, especially my 9-year-old.  . . .  Tonka put so many smiles on so many faces. His lovable, goofy personality made everyone around him happy,” Mongno wrote on Facebook.

Mongno’s Facebook profile has many pictures of Tonka with her children.

One photo showed Tonka sleeping in the car with Mongno’s son James, 9, and daughter Lauren, 3. James was resting his head on Tonka, who was curled up in the middle seat between him and his little sister. Another photo showed a younger and smaller Tonka sitting on the couch with his tongue sticking out as James lay next to him with a big smile on his face.

“My son cried himself to sleep every night,” Mongo said.

James skipped school last Friday because he knew his friends and classmates would ask about what happened to his dog, Mongno said, but he didn’t want to talk about Tonka.

Read more:

Family dog found dead in plane’s cargo hold after a two-hour flight delay

Game wardens killed a deer — in front of the family that kept it as a pet

This Alabama hunter shot and killed an 820-pound hog — after it wandered into his front yard

Deaths of Dogs – and Why It’s Not Cute

by Barry Kent MacKay
02 Dec 2016 12:26 PM PST

Polar Bear and Dog <http://www.bornfreeusa.org/images/blogs/canadianblog/polarbeardog_sm.jpg> © David de Meulles / YouTube

Finally, the same internet that has continually shown a video that has utterly charmed millions (but sickened me) has exposed the truth… although, I suspect that many will miss that and go on mindlessly grinning at the original images.

I’ll explain all of that in a moment. First, let me say that, as someone increasingly concerned about the fates of wild and domestic animals—working with dedicated professional colleagues sharing the value I put on all life, human and animal—I can never understand why people seem to think an animal’s “worth” is relative to how much he or she acts like humans, or unlike how the animal’s own nature dictates.

Polar bears are predatory. So, when videos emerged on the internet some time ago showing a bear seeming to play with a sled dog, I immediately wrote to a polar bear biologist. The expert told me that he knew all about it, including how many dogs have been killed by being left chained outside, helpless, in a region that is well-visited by polar bears.

“We’ve tried to tell that to people for years,” I was told.

The video does not show that part of the story.

The bear, overwhelmingly powerful, is in no hurry to make a kill. The animal first examines the unsuspecting dog, and that is the part the video shows: sniffing and petting only. It’s been viewed more than four million times. What the viewers don’t see is that the bear then chose another dog, possibly one of those on short leashes in the background, and killed and ate that one.

It’s intolerable enough to leave dogs tied up overnight without shelter as a roadside attraction at the Mile 5 Sanctuary near Churchill, Manitoba. But, feeding polar bears to attract them to the site makes it worse.

The owner of the property, Mike Ladoon, explained what happened by <http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/polar-bear-dog-video-churchill-manitoba-1.3855128> telling CBC news, “That was the only day we didn’t feed the [expletive] bears, the only night we didn’t put anything out.”

But, it’s not just the dogs. Churchill is a community full of men, women, and children trying to live within the range of the bears. By acclimatizing the bears to human activity and teaching them that humans provide food, the risk of an attack by a bear on a human increases—and so does the chance that the bear, having no fear, will be shot.

It’s a delicate balance between living with the huge predators, benefiting from the presence of the bears as a tourist attraction (as thousands of people go there to see them), and protecting life, limb, and property of the people.

Charges have been laid against Ladoon, both for interfering with the bears and for his treatment of the dogs. Let’s hope the word gets out to those still smiling at the misleading video, not understanding how wrong it all is.
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Salma Hayek’s Dog Found Shot Dead On Her Ranch

Salma Hayek seeks justice for her dog Mozart shot dead on Washington state ranch

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
 
Heartbroken Salma Hayek wants justice for her fatally shot dog.
NY Daily News
 Heartbroken Salma Hayek wants justice for her fatally shot dog.

The notorious animal lover’s prized pooch Mozart was found dead on her Washington state ranch last week, she revealed in a gutwrenching Instagram post Friday.

DETROIT MAN AWARDED $100K SETTLEMENT AFTER COP KILLED DOG

“I haven’t posted for a week as I been mourning the death of my dog, Mozart who I personally delivered out of his mother’s womb. He was found dead in my ranch last Friday with a shot close to his heart,” she wrote.

“I am hoping that the Washington State authorities do justice to this wonderful dog whom in 9 years never bit or attacked anyone.”

The Austrian virtuoso’s namesake “loved his territory and never strayed away,” Hayek eulogized.

PUPPY SHOT 18 TIMES WITH BB GUN GETS ADOPTED

“He was the most loving and loyal companion. He didn’t deserve a slow and painful death.”

The 49-year-old “Frida” star won’t be the only one feeling Mozart’s absence, as Hayek previously revealed a laundry list of animals that inhabit her ranch.

Mozart "loved his territory and never strayed away," Hayek wrote.Salma Hayek/Instagram

Mozart “loved his territory and never strayed away,” Hayek wrote.

Thousands of Spanish hunting dogs are killed or abandoned each winter

June 9

Elegant, regal, and admired for their intense speeds, dogs in the 18th century — primarily greyhounds — were often used as hunting dogs in rural Spain during the winter. But over the centuries and in recent years it has been estimated that over 50,000 dogs have been put down or abandoned in open fields left to die at the end of the hunting season because they are considered too old or slow to hunt again, or too expensive to care for.

Photographer and longtime animal activist Martin Usborne reached his Kickstarter goal toward publishing the forthcoming book “Where Hunting Dogs Rest” (U.S release scheduled for September) on June 4.  In the book, Uborne captures achingly beautiful portraits of hunting dogs rescued from an unfortunate end.

More: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2015/06/09/thousands-of-spanish-hunting-dogs-are-put-down-each-winter-a-new-book-looks-at-the-ones-who-were-spared/

Save Dogs from the evil of Traps

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ACTION ALERT: Do you have a story about a dog caught in a trap or snare even if it was not your dog? Many animals, including dogs, are unintentionally brutally killed or injured in snares. Contact Governor Dayton, share your story, ask him to eliminate wildlife snaring.

Gov. Dayton phone #: 651-201-3400, toll-free: 800-657-3717
Gov. Dayton contact form: http://bit.ly/1EDwQgh

Please share your story with us. It may be used to pass legislation. Email: info@howlingforwolves.org

_______________________________

Bill in Legislature tries to save dogs from accidental trappings

 by: DOUG SMITH , Star Tribune

  • March 18, 2015 – 10:27 AM

Dogs continue to be trap victims, and a controversial bill in the Legislature aims to change that

Rosie Nordby knew something was wrong when she stepped outside her rural Pequot Lakes home Nov. 29 to retrieve the family’s three dogs, and Lily, a chocolate Lab with a two-week-old litter of eight puppies, was missing.

“It was like she just disappeared,” Nordby recalled this week.

She and her husband, Daren, and three kids searched, called neighbors and then authorities, fearing their hunting dog had been stolen. That night, the family hand-fed Lily’s puppies to keep them alive.

Rosie Nordby found Lily the next day, dead in a body-gripping trap set in a ditch about 750 feet from her family’s house.

“I was heartbroken,” she said. “I’m glad it was me who found her and not my kids. It was traumatic.”

Lily was one of at least 34 dogs caught accidentally in traps in Minnesota last year and among five that were killed. Since 2012, the Department of Natural Resources says 75 dogs have been caught in traps and snares, and 17 died. A group pushing for trapping restrictions claims at least 25 dogs have been killed during that time.

The issue, which gained attention in 2012 when the Legislature tightened some trapping restrictions in response to dog deaths, is again being scrutinized. A bill was introduced this session that further stiffens trapping regulations to reduce or eliminate accidental dog deaths.

Gov. Mark Dayton’s administration has testified in support of the measure.

Supporters say the changes made three years ago haven’t stopped the accidental trapping of dogs.

“We need to do something so our pets don’t get killed anymore,” said Sen. John Hoffman, DFL-Champlin, author of the bill.

Hoffman’s bill would require body-gripping traps to be either completely submerged in water or have enclosures with smaller openings and larger recesses, or be placed at least 5 feet above ground. These methods would greatly reduce the chances of a dog being accidentally trapped, he said.

The Minnesota Trappers Association and the Minnesota Forest Zone Trappers Association both oppose the measure, saying the proposals would greatly limit the effectiveness of trappers.

“Trappers want this issue to go away more than anyone,” Gary Leistico, an attorney representing the Minnesota Trappers Association, testified Tuesday at a Senate hearing in St. Paul. “We’ll continue to work with everyone, but this bill … does much more than what it’s claimed to do. It would not allow meaningful trapping in Minnesota.”

The Minnesota Forest Zone Trappers Association also opposes the bill, as does Michael Tucker, who runs a wildlife removal service and is a member of the National Wildlife Control Operators Association. Tucker told legislators the bill would severely limit the ability of businesses like his to remove problem animals.

Trappers reduce predators of ground-nesting game birds, such as raccoons, skunks, mink, fox and coyotes, the groups say.

And a section in Hoffman’s bill requiring body-gripping traps used near water to be fully submerged would greatly reduce the taking of beavers, who cause damage to culverts and roads around the northern half the state, opponents say.

 

“You’re taking away the most effective way to trap beaver,” said Randy Goldenman of Zimmerman, who traps beaver for Sherburne County. “I catch up to 200 a year.”

Hoffman says his bill isn’t meant to be anti-trapping and wouldn’t inhibit trapping. “It will just make it safer for dogs and our pets,” he said.

The issue is an emotional one and drew impassioned testimony. Among those testifying in support was a handler for a search-and-rescue dog, the executive director of a Cloquet animal shelter that took in a dog injured in a trap and several hunters.

Loren Waalkens of Lake City, whose beagle, Frisbee, was caught in a body-grip trap in 2011, pleaded with senators to tighten regulations. Though he saved his dog with mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, he said Frisbee now has breathing problems related to the incident.

And Waalkens said when he hunts rabbits he’s constantly concerned his dogs will encounter another trap. “It’s taken the joy of hunting from me,” he said. “Please do something about this.”

Kurt Boerner, an upland bird hunter from Wayzata, said his English setter had a close encounter with a trap, and since then he’s been on a quest to tighten trapping laws. He’s quit hunting when trapping season begins and told outstate friends not to come to Minnesota to hunt during trapping season.

“The problem isn’t trappers, it’s the regulations,” he testified.

Tim McCauley of Fridley is a board member of Dog Lovers 4 Safe Trapping MN, which has pushed for tighter trapping laws, too. He no longer hunts public lands in Minnesota during the trapping season, either, for fear of losing a dog.

“I won’t take the risk,” he said in an interview. “It would ruin my life if I lost my dog.”

Restrictions passed in 2012 require trappers to use a 7-inch overhang when using baited body-gripping traps on public lands. The overhang is intended to prevent dogs from sticking their heads in the trap to reach the bait.

Trapping proponents say the restriction is working. But the DNR reports that since 2012, 15 dogs have been trapped in boxes with overhangs.

Rosie Nordby’s dog was caught in a body-grip trap recessed in a box. The trap was recessed 6 inches, meaning it wasn’t legal. Two of the five dog deaths in 2014 were in illegally set traps.

Some, including DNR officials, say even if the recess had been a legal 7 inches, it probably wouldn’t have saved Lily because of the trap’s location. Meanwhile, the trapper was cited.

“The fine was a whopping $100,” Nordby said.

End the Iditarod

http://www.all-creatures.org/alert/alert-20150209.html
Action Alert from All-Creatures.org

FROM

SledDogma.org
February 2015

ACTION

Iditarod season is upon us again – March 7, 2015

Go here and Write to Iditarod sponsors and supporters

INFORMATION / TALKING POINTS

Sled Dogma: Reality Bites believes that a tethering ban on a federal level is necessary to significantly improve conditions for the sled dogs associated with commercial mushing. Currently commercial sled dog operations are exempt from federal regulations under a “working dog” exclusion.

Please watch Dream an Iditarod Dream (with links to other videos). This video shows the living conditions of the Iditarod “participants” when they’re not “racing”.

See for yourself the conditions in which commercial sled dogs in Alaska are forced to live. These animals are located on a property deep in the woods with no residence on site — they are left alone to fend for themselves without any human supervision besides a daily distribution of food and water.

sled dogs

sled dogs

sled dogs

In the fall in Alaska, Iditarod “training” begins:

sled dogs
“Trainer” in ATV…

sled dogs
One way to transport dogs to “race” venues

For more information, images and videos, visit I Hurt A Dog.com and SledDogma.org



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