Teenage boy killed in Matata hunting accident

 

http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/news/emergency/teenage-boy-killed-in-matata-hunting-accident/

Newstalk ZB Staff , Emergency

Updated 2.51pm: A 16-year-old boy is dead after a hunting incident near Whakatane this morning.

Bay of Plenty Police District Command Centre’s Sergeant Dennis Murphy says police were alerted to the incident around 8 eight o’clock.

A 16 year old male was duck hunting, and while hunting a firearm was discharged. As a result of that he is now unfortunately deceased.”   [Imagine, a firearm discharging while hunting…]imagesQB1DEJIT

Whakatane CIB are investigating the death at Matata but are treating it as a hunting incident.

The boy was one of three teenagers duck shooting at Greig Road today.

He died at the scene.

Bill Maher: If you’re on a safari to kill elephants and the elephant kills you instead… ‘good’

http://www.rawstory.com/2015/04/bill-maher-if-youre-on-a-safari-to-kill-elephants-and-the-elephant-kills-you-instead-good/

Bill Maher - (HBO's Real Time screenshot)

On this week’s edition of HBO’s Real Time, host Bill Maher was all about death during his New Rules segment, expressing happiness that a big game hunter was killed by the very elephant he was stalking, to a Republican named Upright who is still campaigning against Hillary Clinton from beyond the grave.

Maher began by mocking constant target Sarah Palin for her new PAC logo — featuring the Big Dipper over her head — saying stars circling over your head isn’t a sign that you’re looking to the future, “it just means you’ve walked into a stop sign.”

Also see   Laughing at religion is exactly what the world needs: http://www.salon.com/2015/04/26/bill_maher_american_hero_laughing_at_religion_is_exactly_what_the_world_needs/

Rhino Hunt Auction Winner Fears for His Safety

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http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/01/16/us-rhino-hunt-auction-winner-fears-for-his-safety/4517427/

Marie Saavedra, WFAA-TV, Dallas-Fort Worth 6:07 a.m. EST January 17, 2014

A man who paid $350,000 for the right to hunt an endangered African black rhino says he fears for his safety

DALLAS — A U.S. man who paid $350,000 for the right to hunt an endangered African black rhino says he fears for his safety.

Corey Knowlton said that after being revealed as the winner of a controversial Dallas Safari Club auction, he’s received death threats — so many that he says local law enforcement and the FBI are now working to keep them safe.

STORY: Black rhino hunting permit auctioned for $350,000

Knowlton, who has hunted around the world, said there has been a lot of anger and some confusion.

He leads expeditions for both everyday Joes and billionaires looking to hunt, and has been a fixture on The Outdoor Channel. His Facebook page is filled with photos of large deer he’s tracked and killed — wild boar, a bear, even a massive shark.

The Safari Club auctioned the permit to raise money for efforts to protect the black rhino.

Knowlton said his goal was to support conservation efforts for the black rhino. That’s where the money from his bid will go.

But critics feel that the chance to kill one is no kind of reward — and they’re letting him know it.

Still, Knowlton said the hunt is well-managed, and insists he will be targeting an aggressive older male that he says is terrorizing the rest of the herd, and would already be a target.

He said this is a challenge he welcomes.

“I’m a hunter. I want to experience a black rhino. I want to be intimately involved with a black rhino,” Knowlton said. “If I go over there and shoot it or not shoot it, it’s beyond the point.”

He said the death of this black rhino is inevitable.

“They are going to shoot those black rhinos … period. End of story,” he said.

Contributing: The Associated Press

Elephant kills professional big game hunter in Zimbabwe

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Professional hunter tracking a lion for American client crushed to death by young bull elephant in Zambezi Valley

By Peta Thornycroft, Johannesburg

17 Apr 2015

A young bull elephant killed professional hunter Ian Gibson early on Wednesday as he tracked a lion for an American client in a rugged part of north-east Zimbabwe.

Mr Gibson, 55, one of Zimbabwe’s best known big game hunters, died scouting for prey in the Zambezi Valley after a young bull elephant charged, then knelt on him and crushed him to death.

“We don’t yet know the full details of how ‘Gibbo’ as we called him, died, as the American client and the trackers are still too traumatised to give us full details,” said Paul Smith, managing director of Chifuti Safaris’ which employed Mr Gibson for the hunt.

The American hunter was on his first trip to Zimbabwe, and only has one leg, but was “fit and strong” and had already shot a leopard. Mr Gibson was scouting for lions when he encountered the elephant.

Mr Gibson’s trackers said the young bull had been in a musth period, which means it was producing much more testosterone then usual.

“We know ‘Gibbo’ shot it once, from about 10 yards away, with a 458 [rifle]. He would never have fired unless he had no alternative. He was a hunter, yes, but he was also a magnificent wildlife photographer and conservationist.

“He was so experienced and this is a most unexpected tragedy.” …

Mr Smith said the young bull elephant appeared not to be a natural target for any hunter as its tusks were too small.

“In most years someone is usually killed on a hunt somewhere in Africa, and that is why it is called ‘dangerous game hunting‘ but we are very shocked that it was ‘Gibbo’,” said Mr Smith.

Mr Gibson began his wildlife career in Zimbabwe’s department of national parks, but left to become a hunter about 25 years ago.

He was well-known in the US, where the Dallas Safari Club is paying his funeral expenses.

More: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/zimbabwe/11546066/Elephant-kills-professional-big-game-hunter-in-Zimbabwe.html

Hunter Ian Gibson Trampled To Death By Elephant He Was Tracking To Kill For Ivory

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2015/04/17/hunter-ian-gibson-trampled-death-elephant-tracking-kill_n_7085374.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000063

A professional game hunter has been trampled to death by an elephant he was attempting to kill.

Ian Gibson was leading a hunt in Chewore North in the lower Zambezi Valley of Zimbabwe, when the bull elephant “began a full charge. ”

In an online note on the website of his employers Safari Classics, the company explained Gibson had been tracking the elephant for five hours with a client when they stopped for a rest.

ian gibson

Ian Gibson was killed by a charging African bull elephant

It adds: “Feeling he was quite close to the elephant, Ian and his tracker Robert continued to follow the tracks in hopes of getting a look at the ivory as the client stayed with the game scout.”

SEE ALSO:

Gibson’s tracker indicated the elephant was in “musth” – a condition where the animal’s urge to mate goes into overdrive and it becomes overly aggressive, but Gibson continued.

The note continues: “They eventually caught up with the bull, spotting him at about 50-100 metres. The bull instantly turned and began a full charge.

bull elephant zimbabwe

The animal was in a state of ‘musth’ making it aggressive (file picture)

“Ian and Robert began shouting in order to stop the charge. At very close range, Ian was able to get off one shot before the bull killed him. The scene was very graphic.”

It is not known if the animal was injured or killed in the incident.

Gibson is paid tribute to as “a fine man and one of the most experienced professional hunters on the African continent.”

The same company lost a staff member in 2012 when Owain Lewis was killed by a buffalo, NewZimbabwe reports.

Hunter Killed by Bull Elephant!

http://africageographic.com/blog/hunter-killed-bull-elephant-musth/

Ian Gibson, a professional hunter for Chifuti Safaris, was killed by an elephant bull while guiding an elephant hunt in Chewore North in the lower Zambezi Valley. 

Ian Gibson hunter

A message shared on africahunting.com by Safari Classics said:

“It is with deep sadness to announce the passing of Chifuti Safaris professional hunter Ian Gibson. Ian was tragically killed by an elephant bull earlier today while guiding and elephant hunt in Chewore North (lower Zambezi Valley).

The details are just starting to emerge as we write this. However it appears that Ian and his client had been on the tracks of an elephant bull for approximately five hours when they decided to take a break and allow the client to rest. Feeling he was quite close to the elephant, Ian and his tracker Robert continued to follow the tracks in hopes of getting a look at the ivory as the client, stayed with the game scout to rest. Robert indicated the bull was in musth. They eventually caught up to the bull, spotting him at about 50-100 meters. The bull instantly turned and began a full charge. Ian and Robert began shouting in order to stop the charge. At very close range, Ian was able to get off one shot before the bull killed him. The scene was very graphic.”

– See more at: http://africageographic.com/blog/hunter-killed-bull-elephant-musth/#sthash.u6QkEGCu.dpuf

Illegal Pre-season/Nightime Turkey Hunt Results in Fatal Accident

Turkey hunting season doesn’t begin in the Upstate until April 1, McCullough said. Hunting turkeys at night is illegal, even during turkey season….

Gaffney man dies after turkey hunting accident

Published: Sunday, March 29, 2015 at 4:39 p.m.
Wildlife Photography©Jim Robertson  All Rights Reserved

Wildlife Photography©Jim Robertson All Rights Reserved

Last Modified: Sunday, March 29, 2015 at 4:39 p.m.

A Gaffney man died following a hunting incident off Robbs School Road over the weekend, authorities say.

Cherokee County Coroner Dennis Fowler said in a statement Sunday that the body of Brian James Gilliam, 42, of 1202 Bonner Road, Lot 6, was discovered in a wooded area off Robbs School Road about noon Saturday.

Fowler said Gilliam was found after neighbors of the property reported seeing a light projecting in the air late Friday night.

“It appears Gilliam was in a deep ravine on the property and was attempting to climb out of it on large, unstable rocks when he slipped, and the muzzle-loaded shotgun discharged, striking him in the right arm and shoulder,” Fowler said in the statement. “After being shot, Gilliam walked some 40 yards to the cleared area where he was found.”

Fowler said his investigation indicates Gilliam and a friend had trespassed on the property Friday night to illegally hunt turkeys but later became separated. A flashlight in the “on” position was found pointing upward on a tree stump near the body. Fowler said it appeared that Gilliam used the light to alert his friend of his location.

The friend, who Fowler did not identify, was picked up about 2 a.m. after failing to locate Gilliam, and returned to his home with a turkey he said Gilliam shot and gave to him before the two became separated, Fowler said. Gilliam’s daughter and others searched Saturday but were unable to locate the missing hunter.

Gilliam had no identification with him but was positively identified through fingerprints, Fowler said. An autopsy has been scheduled for Monday morning.

More: http://www.goupstate.com/article/20150329/ARTICLES/150329648?tc=ar

Also: http://www.wbtw.com/story/28649750/sc-hunter-dies-in-accident-with-muzzle-loading-shotgun

Three 4-year-olds and a 99 y.o. woman reported killing deer in 2013

w/poll: At what age do you think kids are old enough to hunt deer and turkeys?

Total Votes: 24

1-4 0 0%
5-7 1 4%
8-12 10 42%
13 and older

http://lancasteronline.com/news/local/hunting-stats-three–year-olds-reported-killing-deer-in/article_14cb8108-a6fa-11e4-895b-b7f384993d31.html

January 28, 2015 9:29 am | Updated: 10:37 am, Wed Jan 28, 2015.

When the Pennsylvania Board of Game Commissioners on Tuesday proposed setting 7 as the minimum age for kids to get tags for hunting deer and turkeys, some people asked the obvious question:

“How many kids that young are actually killing deer and turkeys?”

We wondered the same thing.

The state’s mentored youth hunting program since 2006 has allowed kids of any age under the age of 12 – the minimum age for buying a hunting license – to hunt certain game, while under direct supervision of a licensed adult.

In most cases, we’re talking about parents or grandparents.

The board of Game Commissioners on Tuesday voted to tweak the program so that kids of any age under 12 still can hunt turkey and deer, but the state will only issue tags to kids age 7 and older.

If kids under 7 want to shoot turkeys or deer, their mentors have to transfer their own tags to the kids.

Many hunters and hunting organizations, such as the Pennsylvania Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs, want the program to remain as is, with no minimum age placed on the program.

They call such limits “barriers” to hunting.

For example, they said, what if a parent has more than one kid under 7 who wants to go buck hunting?

In Pennsylvania, the parent can only have one buck tag, so only one kid would be able to shoot a buck.

While those who oppose any minimum age have been getting all the media attention, the commissioners said they’ve heard from plenty of hunters who agree with their proposal.

They said some even sent them comments stating they believe no kids under 12 should be allowed to hunt deer.

For those of you out there, like us, who have been wondering how many kids under the age of 7 have been out hunting deer and turkeys, here’s a table showing, by age of the hunters, the number of those animals reported to the Game Commission during the 2013-14 hunting season.

The numbers reported here don’t indicate the number of kids – or adults – of a particular age who were out hunting.

The list only shows how many animals were reported as being shot by hunters of a particular age.

Given historical data, more animals likely were shot, because Pennsylvania hunters are notorious for not reporting their kills to the Game Commission.

(By the way, even though we’re focused on kids, it’s interesting to note there was one buck last season reportedly shot by a 99-year-old woman.)

why

Dog guards hunter’s body in wildlife refuge duck blind

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Dog-guards-hunters-body-in-wildlife-refuge-duck-blind-289326711.html

LONGVIEW, Wash. (AP) – A dog protecting its owner wouldn’t let a manager at the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge approach the duck blind where the hunter had fatally collapsed.

The Clark County sheriff’s office says Ridgefield police removed the aggressive dog using a catch pole Tuesday evening and medics confirmed the 54-year-old man was dead, presumably of natural causes.

The Columbian reports the man went hunting at 5 a.m. but didn’t check out at dusk, so the manager went to check on him. A duck he had shot was inside the blind with him.

The dog was held for a family member to retrieve.

imagesQB1DEJIT

Man shot by Hyannis hunter says he’s happy to be alive

—Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson

—Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson

http://www.whdh.com/story/27579597/man-shot-by-hunter-while-walking-in-hyannis-woods

HYANNIS, Mass. (WHDH) – A hunter accused of shooting a jogger twice appeared in court Tuesday while police searched for the weapon and the victim recovered at home.

Sean Houle, 47, was arrested and will face a number of charges including careless and negligent use of a weapon causing injury. He also faces other charges including unlawful possession of a primer and unlawful possession of firearm for another gun he was said to be carrying at the time.

Barnstable police said Houle accidentally shot the jogger while he was hunting for deer.

The victim, Jon Way, was hit twice with pellets from Houle’s black powder shotgun, but was recovering. The first shot hit him in the hand.

“I somehow just dove behind a small tree, but didn’t exactly figure out where it came from because it happened so quick. Once the second shot came it went right into my back. That’s when I was realized it was being shot at me, and I started yelling,” Way said.

In court Houle said he had fired at group of deer, but then he heard someone yelling to stop so he ran up to see what had happened.

“Maybe he thought I was a deer, but you don’t shoot at a deer if you can’t identify it,” Way said.

Prosecutors said police still had not found the shotgun Houle was using and said his son may have left the scene with the gun.

It was already dark outside when the shooting occurred around 5 p.m. Monday.

Prosecutors said Houle didn’t have the proper hunting license and has a history of hunting violations and multiple assault and battery cases dating back to the 1990s.

He entered a not guilty plea and was ordered held on $4,000 bail.