Stop Yellowstone National Park’s Bison Slaughter!

PLEASE SIGN AND SHARE!

Stop Yellowstone National Park’s Bison Slaughter! Sign Our One Click Letter No Matter Where You Live! In February 2014, we asked you to oppose the slaughter of bison in America’s oldest national park and you responded by the thousands. We need you to speak up again, because Yellowstone National Park is continuing to kill these majestic and wild animals. Since January 15, approximately 250 bison have been captured inside the park and all, with the exception of five, tragically transported to slaughterhouses. In addition, Montana hunters and treaty hunters have killed at least 150 bison along the park’s borders, raising the death toll to 400 individuals.  The Montana livestock industry wants America’s last wild bison dead. The Montana Livestock Industry has zero tolerance and no respect for wild animals such as bison. These bison are being rounded up and shipped to slaughter to appease livestock ranchers in Montana who unfairly compete with bison for grazing space.  In 1995, the Montana legislature adopted MCA 81-2-120 in response to political pressure by cattle ranchers to stop wild bison from migrating from Yellowstone National Park into Montana. MCA 81-2-120 gives the Montana Department of Livestock complete jurisdiction over migratory bison, which means that bison can be physically removed, hazed, rounded-up, killed by hunters, and sent to slaughter at the will and order of the Montana livestock industry. Click here to take action: https://secure2.convio.net/ida/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=2709 See this alert on our website here: http://www.idausa.org/stop-yellowstone-national-parks-bison-slaughter/
(Bison Photo copyright Jim Robertson)

Stop Yellowstone National Park’s Bison Slaughter!

Sign Our One Click Letter No Matter Where You Live!

In February 2014, we asked you to oppose the slaughter of bison in America’s oldest national park and you responded by the thousands. We need you to speak up again, because Yellowstone National Park is continuing to kill these majestic and wild animals. Since January 15, approximately 250 bison have been captured inside the park and all, with the exception of five, tragically transported to slaughterhouses. In addition, Montana hunters and treaty hunters have killed at least 150 bison along the park’s borders, raising the death toll to 400 individuals.

The Montana livestock industry wants America’s last wild bison dead.
The Montana Livestock Industry has zero tolerance and no respect for wild animals such as bison. These bison are being rounded up and shipped to slaughter to appease livestock ranchers in Montana who unfairly compete with bison for grazing space.

In 1995, the Montana legislature adopted MCA 81-2-120 in response to political pressure by cattle ranchers to stop wild bison from migrating from Yellowstone National Park into Montana. MCA 81-2-120 gives the Montana Department of Livestock complete jurisdiction over migratory bison, which means that bison can be physically removed, hazed, rounded-up, killed by hunters, and sent to slaughter at the will and order of the Montana livestock industry.

Click here to take action:

https://secure2.convio.net/ida/site/Advocacy…

See this alert on our website here:

http://www.idausa.org/stop-yellowstone-national-parks-biso…/

Another New Contest Hunt?

First the bad news–New Coyote Derby in announced in Montana

MT contest hunt

Then the terrific News! Bill to Ban Coyote Killing Contests in New Mexico Passes First Hurdle Today!

Today SB 253, a bill sponsored by New Mexico Senator Mark Moores and Representative Jeff Steinborn to ban coyote killing contests passed out of committee with a vote of 6-3.

This contest-hunt ban effort is work that WildEarth Guardians is doing with coalition partners Animal Protection Voters, @Southwest Environmental Center, and others who are committed to improving treatment of wildlife in New Mexico through changes in state legislation.

200+ Yellowstone Bison Sent to Slaghter

Photo Copyright Jim Robertson

Photo Copyright Jim Robertson

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/at-least-200-yellowstone-bison-have-been-sent-to-slaughter-conservation-group/ar-AA8wPh0

Yellowstone National Park has shipped at least 200 bison near the park boundary with Montana to slaughter as the famed tourist destination seeks to reduce a herd by 900 animals this winter, a U.S. conservation group said on Friday.

A park spokesman, Al Nash, could not immediately confirm how many bison may have been handed over to tribal partners and taken to slaughter. But he said 162 bison had been captured and placed into a holding facility as of a week ago.

The Buffalo Field Campaign, which opposes the culling and has been monitoring it, said the bison had been dispatched to slaughter since Wednesday, and anticipated that 55 more could be sent on Monday.

The culling plan allows the bulk of bison marked for death to be transferred to Native American tribes for slaughter and a certain number of the wandering buffalo to be killed by hunters.

The strategy is designed to address worries by ranchers that bison infected with the bacterial disease brucellosis, which can cause miscarriages in cattle, could transmit it to their herds, potentially threatening Montana’s brucellosis-free status.

The plan this winter to reduce the bison population to 4,000 from 4,900 comes as conservation groups are seeking federal protections for a herd that is a top attraction for the 3 million annual visitors to a park that spans parts of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

Buffalo Field Campaign spokeswoman Stephany Seay called the culling practice “the brutal abuse and slaughter of the only wild population of buffalo remaining in this country.”

The iconic hump-backed animals once roamed by the tens of millions west of the Mississippi until hunting campaigns reduced their numbers to the fewer than 50 that found safe harbor at Yellowstone in the early 20th century.

The Buffalo Field Campaign said that roughly another 100 bison have been killed by hunters outside the park in Montana, while Nash, citing state officials, put that number lower, at 70.

Nash said the park usually engages in culling in winter, when bison migrate to lower elevations in search of food. Federal and state officials on horseback have been capturing animals along the park boundary, both inside and outside the park.

Conservationists petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last year to provide federal safeguards for the Yellowstone herd, contending it was the only free-roaming band in the country to retain its genetic integrity.

(Reporting by Eric M. Johnson in Seattle; Editing by Sandra Maler)

It’s All a Game: New Tags Allow Wolf-Pelt Transport To Canada

USFWS Helps to Market Wolf Pelts: ‏

http://fwp.mt.gov/news/newsReleases/fishAndWildlife/nr_0722.html

Fish & Wildlife

Wed Jan 21 10:57:00 MST 2015

With the recent approval from the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Montana wolf hunters and trappers who harvest wolves will now obtain internationally recognized pelt tags to allow for the export of wolf pelts directly out of country, usually to Canadian fur auction houses.

Montana’s CITES wolf-pelt tags were obtained under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, an international agreement between governments. Its aim is to ensure that international trade in specimens of CITES-listed wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival.

“This is a big change from the past couple of years in terms of hunter and trapper harvest opportunity to sell wolf pelts,” said Brian Giddings, statewide furbearer coordinator for Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks in Helena.

Any hunter or trapper who harvests a wolf taken during the 2014-2015 season—Sept. 6, 2014 through Feb. 28, 2015—can now have it tagged with a CITES pelt tag.

As a condition of CITES approval, however, no prior season harvested wolf can receive a CITES tag, Giddings said.

Additionally, Montana’s wolf CITES tags cannot be used for any other method of mortality such as road-killed, federal Wildlife Services’ control action, landowner/livestock control, or incidental take. Nor can CITES tags be used for wolves taken on Tribal lands.

Hunters and trappers have strict reporting requirements. Upon the harvest of a wolf, hunters and trappers must call 1-877-FWP-WILD—1-877-397-9453—within 24 hours to file a report. Wolf pelts must be tagged within 10 days of harvest.

State tags issued earlier this hunting and trapping season can be replaced with the new wolf CITES tags by contacting the nearest FWP regional office. Once one receives a wolf CITES tag the old state-issued wolf tag can be removed and discarded.

For more information on CITES wolf-pelt tags contact your nearest FWP office.

To learn more about Montana’s wolf hunting season, visit FWP online atfwp.mt.gov. Click “Hunting Guides” and choose Wolf.

Featured Image -- 7624

More Coyote Killing

Coyote hunt begins Wednesday

Published: Monday, January 19, 2015 12:49 PM MST

Central Montana’s Coyote Hunt is slated to begin on Jan. 21.  The contest was initiated, when hunters saw more coyotes in the field than deer and antelope during hunting season.  The hunt has been successful in the eyes of many ranchers who have commented on previous years’ hunts. For hunters in the field this year, many noticed the coyotes seemed to be running in packs even sooner, and for many in the field it seemed as if a dent had not even been made in  the population of predators.

The cost of being on the poster and helping to fund the contest is $100. All money raised goes to the hunters who bring in their entries. The contest will be run the same as last year with the drop offs at Don’s Store and the Sport Center in Lewistown.

During last year’s contest there were hunters entering coyotes from all over Central Montana’s trade area including Harlowton, Ryegate, Jordan, Winnett, Grass Range, Big Sandy, Winifred, Geraldine, Denton, Stanford, Geyser, Hobson, Moccasin, Utica, Moore, Judith Gap and Lewistown.

No hunter or trapper is able to enter more than 50 in the contest. Each entry is given a ticket and at the end of the hunt on April 1 tickets are drawn for the prize money. Holding the drawing in this manner lets the hunter who enters once have as good a chance at the prize money as the rest of the hunters, except a hunter who shoots more coyotes gets more entries into the contest.

Sponsors this year are PJG Motorsports, Custom Cut Meats, Fleet Supply, Judith MTN Meats, Utica Rod and Gun Club, Lewistown Plumbing and Repair, Doc’s OK Corral, Yogo Inn, Lewistown Taxidermy, Big Dry Saddlery, Ace Hardware, Hilger Meats, Advanced Electric, Lewistown Propane, Lewistown Honda-Polaris-Kawasaki, Sport Center and Don’s Store. To be listed or be anonymous as a sponsor contact Dale or Charlie Pfau at Don’s Store 538-9408 or John Tognetti  at the Sport Center 535-9308.
Slaughter the Earth...

Some MT Wolf Hunt/Trap Stats

copyrighted wolf in river

MT: Lincoln County bagging fair share of wolves

 Justin Steck
The Western News

Ninety-six wolves have been taken, with eight harvested by trapping, during Montana’s wolf hunting and trapping season.

In region one, which encompasses Lincoln County, 30 wolves have been taken by hunting and two have been trapped. Those numbers were from John Fraley at Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks office in Kalispell.

Montana wolf trapping season got underway on Dec. 15 and will run until Feb 28. Archery season for wolves ran from Sept. 6-14, and general rifle season began Sept.15 and continues until Mar. 15.

Local taxidermist Gerry Mercer said trapping season starts to take-off when the snow falls and it starts to get cold, which should be soon. Last year he had a dozen wolves come through his shop.

According to 2013 numbers from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks, the total number of wolves taken during the season was 230, 143 were hunted and 87 trapped.

Wolf Management Units 100 and 101, which include Lincoln County and a portion of Flathead County, were the areas with the highest numbers of harvested wolves in the state. The number of wolves taken in those two areas was 28 in 100 and 38 in 101.

Last year 24,479 wolf licenses were issued, 22,169 of those were to Montana residents.

Senate Bill 200 is a new bill that allows for landowners in Wolf Management Units 200, 400, 310 and 390 to take up to 100 wolves total that may potentially be a threat to humans, livestock or dogs. The quota will be examined in four 25-wolf increments throughout the year, with increases needing to be approved by Fish Wildlife & Parks.

The first fair chase wolf hunting season in Montana was 2009. Before then, no rules existed to regulate the number or means by which wolves could be taken. That year 60 wolves were taken during the season lasting from Oct. 25 to Nov. 15.

In 2011, the number of wolves harvested rose to 166. The total number of wolves killed during the 2012 season fell to 128.

Court challenges barred the 2010 wolf hunting season.

Source

Some Sad News: Missing wolf hunters found safe

spent 2 nights stuck in snow.

528624c939a88_preview-620

BUTTE – A father and son who were hunting wolves and hadn’t been seen since Saturday morning have been found safe, according to the Beaverhead County Sheriff’s office.

Scott, 56, and Conrad, 33, McDougal were located in a southwest portion of Beaverhead County, approximately 40 miles from Dell Montana. The father and son got stuck in deep snow and spent two nights with their vehicle. Both are in reasonably good condition.

Early Sunday afternoon, Beaverhead Search and Rescue was called to help find the pair. The hunters did not provide relatives information concerning their hunt. Searchers could only identify a starting point based upon the hunters usual activity.

Search members used four-wheel drive trucks and all-terrain vehicles to comb the area outside of Dell, in the area of Sage Creek, until 10 p.m. Sunday.

A helicopter from Lifeflight in Butte assisted as well. Weather was problematic, sheriff Jay Hansen said.

On Monday, 16 searchers planned to work with fixed-wing aircraft and searchers using trucks and ATV’s…

More: http://missoulian.com/news/local/missing-wolf-hunters-found-safe-spent-nights-stuck-in-snow/article_05fa76d0-1196-5949-a29c-1237acad6fad.html

 

 

Montana Multiple Grizzly Bear-Killer Charged With “Unlawful Taking”

Photo Copyright Jim Robertson

Photo Copyright Jim Robertson

November 09, 2014 5:26 pm  • 

Everett Skunkcap, of Browning, showed no apparent remorse for allegedly shooting three grizzly bears Aug. 6, reportedly telling Blackfeet Fish and Wildlife investigators that last year he shot another grizzly bear and if “any grizzlies were on his property he would shoot them again,” according to the probable cause affidavit filed in the case Nov. 5. “Skunkcap was instructed to call the (Fish and Wildlife) office if there were bear management issues” but “Skunkcap responded that he would just shoot them anyway.”

Grizzly bears are a federally protected species, listed as threatened.

Investigators reported that one of the bears, a female, was approximately 17 years old and the other two were about a year and a half old.

Skunkcap took an investigator to the site where he allegedly shot the bears and said he shot the “mother grizzly” first and then shot one of the young bears. The third bear, he said, ran after he shot the first two but returned an hour later and “stood over the two dead grizzlies.” Skunkcap told the investigator that he “figured this grizzly was going to ‘raise hell’ later that night” so he “’might as well do away with it as well.”

Skunkcap told investigators he was alerted to the bears by his dogs at around 10 a.m. and when he spotted them they were walking in the direction of his three grandchildren. He said the bears were about 300 feet from the children. He said the bears were not running and his grandchildren ran into the house. “Skunkcap admitted that all the kids were in the house when he shot the third grizzly.”

Skunkcap reportedly asked if he would get the grizzlies back following the investigation as he wanted to “tan them and put them up on the wall … as a souvenir of what he did.”

Skunkcap was charged with three counts of unlawful taking of a threatened species, each count punishable by up to six months in prison and a maximum $25,000 fine.

What’s to Stop Them?

I attended the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) wolf hearing last week to find out how far the WDFW ultimately plans to go with wolf hunting, once wolves are inevitably removed from the state endangered species list, and when Washington residents can expect to hear that hunting groups are holding contest hunts on wolves like our neighbors in Idaho have already done.

It turns out the department wasn’t ready to come clean on their ultimate plans to implement hunting seasons on wolves (starting in Eastern Washington). They were only willing to talk about the few cases of sheep predation (a few dozen out of a flock of 1,800 animals grazing on public forest land), and the WDFW’s collusion with areal snipers from the federal Wildlife “Services” for some good old fashioned lethal removal. Here are some notes on what I was planning to say, had it been on topic:

Over the years spent living in rural Eastern Washington, I’ve gotten to know how ranchers think and feel, and what they’re capable of. For over twenty years I lived in a cabin outside the Okanogan County town of Twisp, where rancher/convicted poacher Bill White is currently under house arrest. Exploiting his then-good standing and local influence to get permission from the WDFW to gather road-killed deer, under the guise of distributing them as meat to members of the Colville tribe, he used some of the deer as bait to lure wolves from the Lookout pack to within shooting distance. He and his son are credited with killing several members of that pack—the first wolves to make it back into Washington. Their sense of entitlement was so overblown they thought they could get away with sending a blood-dripping wolf hide across the Canadian border.

On the plus side, I also have a lot of experiences with wolves themselves. As a wildlife photographer I’ve photographed them in Alaska and Canada as well as in Montana, where I lived a mile away from Yellowstone National Park. I got to know the real nature and behavior of wolves. I’d like to think that if ranchers knew the wolves the way I do, they wouldn’t be so quick to want to kill them off again. I shouldn’t have to remind folks that wolves were exterminated once already in all of the lower 48 states, except Minnesota, which had only six wolves remaining before the species was finally protected as endangered.

Although I personally believe that wolves belong to no one but themselves, to use game department jargon, wolves and other wildlife belong to everyone in the state equally—not just the squeakist-wheel ranchers and hunters. By far most of Washington’s residents want to see wolves allowed to live here and don’t agree with the department’s lethal wolf removal measures (that no doubt include plans for future wolf hunting seasons, which are currently being downplayed by the WDFW).

What’s to stop Washington from becoming just like Idaho, Montana and Wyoming in implementing reckless wolf-kill programs that eventually lead to contest hunts (as in Idaho) and the subsequent decimation of entire packs? Or year-round predator seasons that ultimately result in federal re-listing (as in Wyoming)? What guarantee do we have that Washington’s wolves will be treated any differently?

Text and Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson

Text and Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson

Group demands return of federal wolf protections at Capitol protest

http://helenair.com/news/local/group-demands-return-of-federal-wolf-protections-at-capitol-today/article_f26cfaea-576b-5185-a950-0da100a42bd5.html

October 20, 2014 6:52 pm  • 

Saying that Montana’s wolf management policy violates the United Nations Charter for Nature, members of the Wolf and Wildlife Action Group delivered a “violation notice” to Gov. Steve Bullock’s office at the Capitol Monday.

Montana’s wolf policy allows for a landowner to kill up to 100 wolves, using what WWAG called cruel and barbaric methods such as aerial gunning and trapping, the violation notice said.

The policy is an attempt to exterminate the gray wolf, and WWAG demanded that wolves return to federal protection under the Endangered Species Act, said member Jeanne Rasmussen.

Bullock was not at his office at the time WWAG delivered the violation notice.

“They are being shot and trapped and gut shot, and they burn baby pups out of their dens,” Rasmussen said. “Hunters just want them eliminated.”

WWAG described itself as an “international grassroots organization” at the Capitol on behalf of 80 percent of Americans who want wolves protected.

Madison County resident Diane Nelson-Steiner spoke passionately about wolves killed near her home along the Big Hole River. She recalled an entire pack shot by government officials flying a USDA plane, and seeing the animals left to rot.

“To see those wolves killed and laying in a field is horrible,” Nelson-Steiner said. “They killed most of the Big Hole pack, and since then we’ve been overrun with elk and deer. It’s getting absolutely ridiculous with the herds getting to be overly large.”

Wolves also kept coyote numbers in check, which have increased dramatically since elimination of the wolf pack, she said.

Nelson-Steiner and her husband, Tim Steiner, brought several foothold traps they said were found illegally set on their property by trappers after wolves. They have found or heard of multiple animals caught in traps including domestic cats and dogs, an eagle, a badger and coyotes, but no wolves, Steiner said.

Yes that’s cruel and inhumane,” Steiner said while holding a trap. “Animal cruelty is against the law in all 50 states. It’s not just wolves they’re catching; it’s everything else.”

“Why are these psychopaths allowed to torture animals in this country, yet 86 other countries have banned trapping?” asked WWAG member Michelle Domeier.

The group held posters showing wolves dead in both foothold traps and snares identified as legal means of killing wolves in Montana. More than 2,600 wolves had been killed since being stripped from federal protections, they said.

After speaking on the Capitol steps, WWAG member Karen Wells delivered the violation notice to the governor’s office, which was taken by staff in Bullock’s absence.

“Montana has a highly-effective wolf management plan, developed through collaboration with stakeholders and based on scientific principles and thorough research,” said Kevin O’Brien, Bullock’s deputy chief of staff, in an email. “While some on the far left and far right may take issue with the management plan, it has resulted in healthy wolf populations in Montana.”

Within the violation notice, WAGG made the following statement:

“One Montana landowner deems a wolf a ‘problem’ wolf (and) they can legally kill it, and may ‘legally’ kill up to 100 Wolves in any cruel method, including cruel and barbaric leg hold traps and snares, poisoning, gassing and burning alive pups in their dens, stomping, clubbing, gut shooting, chasing down and shooting from the air, with no restrictions or quotas. In addition, wolf ‘hunting’ and trapping is allowed from Oct. to May.”

That statement contains several inaccuracies in reference to seasons and new regulations for landowners, said FWP spokesman Tom Palmer. Hunting and foothold traps are legal methods of take, while other methods are prohibited by hunters or trappers, he said.

Montana’s general wolf hunting season runs from Sept. 15 to March 15. The archery only season runs from Sept. 6 to Sept. 14. The trapping season runs from Dec. 15 to Feb. 28, according to regulations. Landowners can kill wolves threatening livestock or people out of season and without a permit under FWP rules.

“Most of this isn’t allowed,” he said. “Snares aren’t allowed. You can’t bait or poison them. You can’t burn them alive. Gut shooting isn’t allowed.”

Landowners also do not have special regulations allowing aerial shooting, he said.

The Fish and Wildlife Commission approved rules that allow up to 100 wolves per landowner, authorized at 25 at a time, he said. Landowners have harvested four wolves under the rules, he said, and baiting is not allowed either in hunting or trapping.

“They (wolves) have to be actively threatening you or your livestock,” Palmer said. “The chances of a landowner seeing a threat and setting out a trap immediately is almost nill.”

When told of FWP’s response, Nelson-Steiner insisted that the regulations allow landowners to use “any” means of killing wolves.

Violations of existing regulations have run rampant, and FWP and the sheriff’s office have failed to enforce state laws in her area, Nelson-Steiner said.

On the issue of international law, Bullock was in direct violation of several items within the UN’s charter, Wells said.

“We demand that these violations be corrected forthwith or these violations will be brought before the International Court of Justice,” the violation notice said.

copyrighted wolf in water