Donald Trump Jr. Ditched Secret Service to Go Moose Hunting

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Two men fined $2,000 for hunting violations

One of the men is accused of firing twice down a roadway at a moose in the direction of a blind corner

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bull moose adobestock_93928765 2017

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NEWS RELEASE
MINISTRY OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND FORESTRY
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Two Spencerville men have been fined a total of $2,000 for hunting offences under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.

Steven Hopkins pleaded guilty and was fined $1,500 for unlawfully discharging a firearm on a travelled roadway.

Barrie Crawford pleaded guilty and was fined $500 for unlawfully possessing an illegally killed bull moose.

Court heard that on Oct. 16, 2017, Hopkins and Crawford were hunting on the Warren Carty Road near Foleyet when they observed a bull moose walking on the road.

Hopkins exited the vehicle and, while standing on the roadway in front of the vehicle, fired twice down the roadway at the moose in the direction of a blind corner. Crawford, who was driving the vehicle at the time, attached his game seal to the moose.

Justice of the Peace Nathalie Breton heard the case in the Ontario Court of Justice, Chapleau, on April 11, 2018.

To report a natural resources violation, call the MNRF TIPS line at 1-877-847-7667 toll-free any time or contact your local ministry office during regular business hours.

You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). And visit here to view an interactive, searchable map of unsolved cases. You may be able to provide information that will help solve a case.

Wildlife policymakers pander to sport hunters

This commentary is by Alana Stevenson, a professional animal behavior specialist who has an master’s degree in biology education and a bachelor’s degree in biology. She is the author of “Training Your Dog the Humane Way” and is certified in Low Stress Handling for dogs and cats.

The population of moose has drastically declined in Vermont due to winter ticks, brainworm, lungworm, loss of habitat and hunting. Yet the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and the Fish and Wildlife Board still support a 2018 moose hunt. For too long the department and the board (solely made up of hunters and trappers with vested self-interests) have catered to hunters and trappers at the expense of animals, wildlife, homeowners and non-hunting Vermonters.

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Board’s rationale (and that of many moose hunters and hunting guides) is that if the moose hunt is suspended, it will be hard to reinstate. And this is how wildlife policy is made — by pandering to “sport” hunters and irrational, self-serving thinking.

In the 1800s, the moose population was nearly wiped out because of hunting. Now the moose again are suffering. Moose who are injured and not recovered do not even count towards a hunter’s “bag limit.” How is this justified? Why is it that the Fish and Wildlife department and board cater to the few when the majority of Vermonters want to see ethical and responsible management?

If a person is killed because they are “shot” by a hunter, it’s labeled a hunting “accident.” You can’t drink and drive, but you can drink and shoot. Hunters seemingly don’t have to follow public noise ordinances. There are many Vermonters who don’t want to hear gunshots outside their windows or near their property. The fact that the non-hunting public and homeowners have so little say in the way wildlife is managed by Vermont Fish and Wildlife is undemocratic and irresponsible.

Animals can be trapped without having to be reported. Traps can be set nearly anywhere, including on public land near walking and hiking trails. Vermont allows killing “contests” and “open” seasons on a number of animals. The way wildlife is managed — or mismanaged — by Vermont’s Fish and Wildlife department and board needs to change.

There are many Vermonters who enjoy viewing wildlife. Wildlife provides peace, beauty and tranquility to hectic lives. Wildlife watching, including viewing moose, contributes to the economy. In many states, far more than hunting does. Those who like to view and/or photograph wildlife, hike, run, rock climb, ski, kayak, bike, birdwatch, paddle board, and participate in non-consumptive outdoor recreation need to have a say in how policy is made and how wildlife is managed in Vermont.

Fading wolf population to be restored at Lake Superior park

 

     

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Federal officials have tentatively decided to transport 20-30 gray wolves to Isle Royale National Park in Michigan over the next three years to replenish a population that has nearly died out because of inbreeding and disease.

The National Park Service said Friday it will make a final decision in 30 days, after the public has had an opportunity to review a new environmental statement that endorses the restoration plan.

Wolves made their way to the Lake Superior island in the late 1940s. Since then, they have played a valuable role in keeping the moose population in check and have become a cherished symbol of the remote wilderness outpost.

But the wolves’ numbers have fallen drastically in recent years. Only two are believed to remain, posing a danger of moose overpopulation.

 

Moose hunter dead from accidental shooting north of Manokotak

  SEP 9, 2017

Brian L. Heinrichsen, 65, killed after accidentally shooting himself with .454 caliber Casull pistol at the start of a moose hunt north of Amanka Lake.  AST says Heinrichsen lives in Puyallup, Washington.

KDLG: A fly-out moose hunting trip ended in tragedy Friday when Brian Leslie Heinrichsen, 65, accidentally shot himself in the chest while pulling a large caliber pistol from a shoulder holster, according to Alaska State Troopers.

Heinrichsen and his hunting partner had arrived at a small, remote lake approximately eight miles north of Amanka Lake that day, and may have still been unpacking their gear, said AST Sgt. Luis Nieves. The victim has hunted in the area before, and he and his hunting partner were lifelong buddies, he said.

The partner, not named by authorities, used a satellite phone to call for help, but the victim was the one who had more experience and apparently also the numbers to call, including for their air taxi Tikchik Airventures. The man called the only number he could find, which was for concierge service on the back of an Alaska Airlines credit card. According to AST, an Alaska Airlines service operator was able to contact the Dillingham dispatcher and Tikchik Airventures to report the incident.

Rick Grant from Tikchik Airventures quickly took state troopers to the scene. According to the investigation, Heinrichsen was likely pulling a .454 Casull pistol from a shoulder holster when he accidentally fired a round into the left side of his chest. The gunshot ended his life within moments, said AST. The .454 Casull is larger and more powerful than the .44 Magnum, and is carried by some hunters for self-defense against bears.

His body was recovered from the scene and flown back to Dillingham, where it was transported to Anchorage for an autopsy.

AST said Heinrichsen listed Hoonah as his address, but contacted his next of kin in Puyallup, Washington, where they believe he now resides.

Moose hunter dead from accidental shooting north of Manokotak

  SEP 9, 2017

Brian L. Heinrichsen, 65, killed after accidentally shooting himself with .454 caliber Casull pistol at the start of a moose hunt north of Amanka Lake.  AST says Heinrichsen lives in Puyallup, Washington.

KDLG: A fly-out moose hunting trip ended in tragedy Friday when Brian Leslie Heinrichsen, 65, accidentally shot himself in the chest while pulling a large caliber pistol from a shoulder holster, according to Alaska State Troopers.

Heinrichsen and his hunting partner had arrived at a small, remote lake approximately eight miles north of Amanka Lake that day, and may have still been unpacking their gear, said AST Sgt. Luis Nieves. The victim has hunted in the area before, and he and his hunting partner were lifelong buddies, he said.

The partner, not named by authorities, used a satellite phone to call for help, but the victim was the one who had more experience and apparently also the numbers to call, including for their air taxi Tikchik Airventures. The man called the only number he could find, which was for concierge service on the back of an Alaska Airlines credit card. According to AST, an Alaska Airlines service operator was able to contact the Dillingham dispatcher and Tikchik Airventures to report the incident.

Rick Grant from Tikchik Airventures quickly took state troopers to the scene. According to the investigation, Heinrichsen was likely pulling a .454 Casull pistol from a shoulder holster when he accidentally fired a round into the left side of his chest. The gunshot ended his life within moments, said AST. The .454 Casull is larger and more powerful than the .44 Magnum, and is carried by some hunters for self-defense against bears.

His body was recovered from the scene and flown back to Dillingham, where it was transported to Anchorage for an autopsy.

AST said Heinrichsen listed Hoonah as his address, but contacted his next of kin in Puyallup, Washington, where they believe he now resides.

Bristol Bay Angels basketball coach, killed in boating incident Sunday on Lake Alekn

This article was updated for the Bristol Bay Times – Dutch Harbor Fisherman newspaper.

Sunday’s moose opening in western Bristol Bay ended in tragedy when 35-year-old Bryan Anderson of Naknek died after falling overboard on a trip across Lake Aleknagik. Anderson was hunting with three others on the boat of Jack Savo, Jr., of Dillingham.

According to state troopers, they were boating back across the lake late when Anderson fell into the water.

“One of the passengers actually witnessed him falling off of the boat,” said AST Sgt. Luis Nieves. “That passenger immediately shouted to the operator, Mr. Savo. He maneuvered the boat to recover Mr. Anderson,” finding him unresponsive in the water. Anderson was not wearing a life jacket.

The boaters pulled Anderson to shore and attempted CPR, then brought him on the vessel and headed quickly back to the launch at Aleknagik.

“They were met by local EMS, who then transported Mr. Anderson to Kananakak [Hospital] where they continued lifesaving measures until he was pronounced deceased at approximately 0250 hours,” said Nieves.

Troopers were first notified of the situation a little past midnight. The state medical examiner requested an autopsy.

By Tuesday state troopers had not offered further detail on what caused Anderson to fall overboard Sunday night. Alcohol may have been involved, according to AST.

Nieves said the boat had the required life jackets on board, but at least Anderson was not wearing one when he fell in.

“Even the most fit person … you go into the water without a life jacket, that cold water is going to immediately cause you to take a gasp for air, which can result in people drinking water,” he said, urging people to boat safely and keep the PFDs on, not just in the boat.

http://kdlg.org/post/bryan-anderson-bristol-bay-angels-basketball-coach-killed-boating-incident-sunday-lake-alekn#stream/0

 

Moose hunter acidentally wounded on New Harbour Barrens

http://www.cbncompass.ca/news/local/moose-hunter-acidentally-wounded-on-new-harbour-barrens-154997/

Oct. 10, 2017

A moose hunter was transported to hospital after sustaining a shotgun wound Tuesday evening along the New Harbour Barrens.

According to Bay Roberts RCMP, it was a single shot resulting from an accident. Members of the Spaniard’s Bay fire department removed the injured hunter from the woods before he was taken to hospital.

According to police, the hunter was alert and conscious as he was transported to hospital.

Donald Trump Jr. Ditched Secret Service to Go Moose Hunting

 http://www.thedailybeast.com/donald-trump-jr-ditched-secret-service-to-go-moose-hunt

Donald Trump Jr. gave up his Secret Service detail in mid-September to go on a moose-hunting trip in the Yukon, according to a report in The New York Timesthat details one reporter’s quest to locate the eldest son of the president during his adventure. Trump voluntarily abandoned the protections when he traveled to the sparsely populated northwest Canada territory, where he spent a week with a few friends and a hunting bow. Trump Jr.’s Secret Service protection has since been reactivated.

Conserving Moose… or Not

http://www.bornfreeusa.org/weblog_canada.php?

Canadian Blog

by Barry Kent MacKay,
Senior Program Associate

Conserving Moose… or Not 11/10/16

Moose© Henry Schimke

North America’s moose population extends from Alaska to the East Coast, through boreal and mountain forests. Throughout much of that range, the species is in decline. Where I live, in Ontario, the population has declined by 20% in just the past 10 years.

There are now about 92,000 moose spread over a vast region. In Minnesota, moose are nearly gone from the northwest and are less than half of their earlier numbers in the northeast. In other places, they are either in decline, holding steady, or—in a few instances—increasing.

98,000 people want to hunt moose in Ontario… which outnumbers the moose!

The threats to moose are vast, including a suite of problems associated with global climate change—which is increasingly evident as you move north. Pressure from all manner of incursions, including forestry practices, mining, roads, recreational use, and so on, can reduce the ability of moose to survive.

But, most of these threats to moose directly benefit human short-term interests. So does hunting, for a vocal minority. And, hunters don’t want to stop hunting (although, of all of the immediate threats to moose, not shooting them is the easiest step that could be taken).

I understand that hunters don’t care, but not that they still claim to be “conservationists.” Of course, if they want to keep killing a species that’s in decline, they are no such thing.

That includes First Nations hunters who, exercising treaty rights, can kill any moose they wish to, without even having to report the numbers. However, when Ontario Environment Commissioner Diane Saxe recently published her first annual report with a section entitled “Ontario’s Moose Population Under Threat,” it was too much for moose hunter Rob Learn. He points to the number of collisions between moose and cars to explain that there are plenty of moose, and that the limit placed on how many can be killed by non-First Nations’ hunters guarantees species survival. He makes the valid point that the determination of how many moose there “should” be, as decided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, is not entirely objective.

And then, there are the natural predators—mainly wolves and bears—who are scapegoated as a cause for moose declines. Killing, as always, becomes the solution.

Here’s a thought; don’t kill them. There’s a long list of North American wildlife species, from northern cod, to passenger pigeons, to bison, to Carolina parakeets, that plummeted from numerous to suddenly rare—even extinct—because the killing didn’t stop in time. We have time.

There are three times more Ontario government employees in Ontario than there are moose. Within their ranks lies the means to save these animals. Let’s start by stopping the killing. It might not happen… but it should.