Bald eagle dies of gunshot wound in Indiana, reward offered

A bullet struck a protected bald eagle in Indiana, leading to the bird’s death, officials said Sunday.

Indiana Conservation Officer Ryan Jahn was investigating the shooting of the bald eagle Saturday in Lawrence County, officials said.

Build UP’s Ruben Morris is changing the trajectory for his students by helping them earn their high school diploma, an associate’s degree and a paid apprenticeship to …

“The eagle was found alive south of the White River near Dixie Road, but later succumbed to the gunshot wound,” Indiana Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement said in a Facebook post on Sunday.

A bald eagle in Indiana was hit by a bullet and later died from its wound, officials said.

A bald eagle in Indiana was hit by a bullet and later died from its wound, officials said. (Indiana Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement)

BALD EAGLE RESCUED IN MISSOURI AFTER BEING SHOT IN WING; SHOOTER COULD FACE $100G FINE

A reward was being offered for information that leads to an arrest, according to the agency.

The killing of a bald eagle is a violation of the federal Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. Violators face up to a year in jail and a fine of up to $100,000.

As of 2008, bald eagles are no longer considered endangered in Indiana.

Researchers still track data on bald eagles to monitor the health of the population and learn more about their behavioral patterns.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/bald-eagle-dies-of-gunshot-wound-in-indiana-reward-offered

U.S. should deny Trump Jr. permit to import endangered sheep trophy from Mongolia

By Kitty Block and Sara Amundson

December 19, 2019 3

No American—regardless of his or her wealth and political connections—should be above the law. That’s why, in a letter to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today, Humane Society International, the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society Legislative Fund, along with the Center for Biological Diversity, are calling on the agency to refuse to allow Trump Jr. to import the body parts of the animal he killed.

The letter states that argali sheep are an imperiled species who should not be hunted for their horns or hides to serve as wall hangings. “The reporting on Mr. Trump Jr.’s argali hunt—that was conducted at night with a laser guided rifle, and without a hunting permit issued before the hunt—raises serious questions regarding the legality of the killing and subsequent import of the animal.”

As ProPublica reported, Trump’s hunt was partially funded by U.S. and Mongolian taxpayers because each country sent security services to accompany the president’s eldest son and grandson on the multiday trip. After the hunt, Trump Jr. is reported to have met privately with the country’s president, Khaltmaagiin Battulga, before returning to the United States.

It was also reported that Trump Jr. did not have a Mongolian permit to kill the argali—a beautiful animal with long, curving horns—when the hunt took place. A permit was issued to him by the Mongolian government only after he had already departed the country, in what was clearly a hasty attempt to cover up a violation of Mongolian law. Such a violation should by itself disqualify Trump Jr. from bringing his trophy home.

Argali from Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia and Tajikistan are listed as threatened in the U.S. Endangered Species Act, and import of a hunting trophy of an ESA-listed species can be authorized only if it furthers conservation. There is no evidence that this was the case here. In fact, Mongolia has a history of using these beautiful and endangered animals as lures for those with money, connections and politics, and has not updated its argali hunting management plan in a decade.

A 2017 FWS finding shows that only a small percentage of hunting license fees in Mongolia actually go to argali conservation and community livelihoods.

Most Americans are opposed to trophy hunting, and do not believe in the canard spread by trophy hunting interests that killing one animal can help save an entire species. In fact, an increasing number of conservation scientists have challenged the notion that trophy hunting benefits conservation.

There is no doubt that Trump Jr. behaved unethically when he pointed a laser guided rifle at a beautiful animal whose species is in a struggle for survival. But this is not just about his poor ethics. As the son of the sitting president, his actions have also put our nation’s reputation as a global leader in the fight to conserve endangered wildlife at great risk. That’s why we urge the USFWS to follow the law and not show any special favors to this trophy hunter who has disgraced our nation and disappointed so many of us with his actions. Our laws should apply equally to every American, regardless of wealth, influence, political connections or name.

Sara Amundson is president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund.

Big-game hunting embezzler from Minnesota imprisoned in North Carolina

This photo shows Jerome "Jerry" Hennessey in Mexico in January 2013. The photo was taken by Arizona-based hunting company, Sonora Dark Horn. The discovery of Hennessey's alleged embezzlement from the Ashby Farmers Cooperative Elevator has led to federal charges against Hennessey. (Photo courtesy of Sonora Dark Horn)
This photo shows Jerome “Jerry” Hennessey in Mexico in January 2013. The photo was taken by Arizona-based hunting company, Sonora Dark Horn. The discovery of Hennessey’s alleged embezzlement from the Ashby Farmers Cooperative Elevator has led to federal charges against Hennessey. (Photo courtesy of Sonora Dark Horn)

BUTNER, N.C. — Jerry Hennessey, who used money from the elevator he managed in Minnesota to pay for big-game hunting trips, on July 29 reported to the low-security area of Butner Federal Correctional Institution in North Carolina.

Hennessey, the former general manager of the Ashby Farmers Elevator Cooperative, was sentenced June 21 in Fergus Falls, Minn. He will serve eight years in prison for federal wire fraud and income tax charges. He pleaded guilty to stealing more than $5 million from the co-op over at least 15 years and writing co-op checks for big-game hunting trips across the globe. He had spent more than $500,000 on taxidermy alone and built facilities at his rural home to display it. Many of the payments were labeled for corn and soybeans to mask the fraud.

Hennessey’s fraud caused the dissolution of the co-op and sale of its assets, as well as the end of his marriage. Erik Ahlgren, a Fergus Falls attorney who serves as a state sponsored trustee for the former cooperative, confirmed that Hennessey’s Dalton residence with its two large outbuildings for taxidermy remains for sale.

Hennessey, 56, requested to be placed at the federal prison in Duluth and U.S. District Court Judge John R. Tunheim said he would request it but could not guarantee it. Hennessey had been living with a daughter in the Minneapolis area. Butner is 1,200 miles from Minneapolis, nearly a 19-hour drive.

Butner’s low security area holds about 1,100 men. The institution lists Hennessey’s release date as May 21, 2026. There is no parole in the federal system, one of the reforms in the federal Sentencing Reform Act of 1984.

The Bureau of Prisons “attempts” to place inmates within a 500-mile radius of their “release residence,” according to its online information.

A bureau spokesperson declined to speak to the “circumstances relating to an individual inmate’s designation” to a particular institution. A “number of factors are considered,” including “security, population, programming, and medical needs.”

Hennessey in court noted he is a diabetic. He had taken several weeks of diabetic supplies when he asked a former elevator worker to drive him from Ashby to Des Moines in September 2018, prior to being charged with federal fraud charges. Hennessey returned to Minnesota and turned himself in after federal charges were filed in December.

NPR: Suspected Rhino Poacher Killed By Elephant, Eaten By Pride Of Lions In South Africa

Officials at Kruger National Park in South Africa said a suspected rhino poacher was killed by an elephant and his remains eaten by lions. Pictured here, an elephant in the park in 2016.

Kevin Anderson/AP

A suspected rhino poacher was killed by an elephant and his remains likely eaten by a pride of lions, park officials in South Africa said.

Kruger National Park rangers received a call last week from the family of the suspected poacher, the park said in a statement issued Friday. According to the family, accomplices of their relative said he was killed by an elephant on Tuesday, while they were in the park to poach rhinos.

The elephant attacked “suddenly,” police Brig. Leonard Hlathi told South African news website TimesLive. Hlathi said the man’s accomplices claimed to have carried his body to a road before leaving the park.

Rangers began search efforts to find the man’s remains and bring the family closure but could not locate a body.

“Indications found at the scene suggested that a pride of lions had devoured the remains leaving only a human skull and a pair of pants,” the statement reads. The remains were found in the Crocodile Bridge section of the park.

Observers were quick to point out the apparent irony. “It’s the Circle of life,” one commentator quipped on Twitter.

Glenn Phillips, managing executive of the park, issued his condolences to the deceased’s family. “Entering Kruger National Park illegally and on foot is not wise, it holds many dangers and this incident is evidence of that,” Phillips said in the statement.

Police are investigating the incident, and the other four suspected poachers have been arrested and will appear in court, according to the statement.

It’s not the first time animals have killed a suspected poacher in South Africa. Last year, one was attacked and eaten by a pride of lions in Limpopo province, police said.

The number of rhinos poached in South Africa has trended down since 2014, but demand for the animal’s horn, nonetheless, remains strong, Reuters reports. More than 500 rhinos were poached for their horns in the first eight months of last year.

Kruger National Park, South Africa’s largest game reserve, covers thousands of square miles along the country’s northeastern border. As of late last year, the park had some 5,000 rhinos, down from around 9,000 in 2014, according to government estimates cited by Reuters. Poaching and drought have both contributed to the decrease.

Last year, South African Minister of Environmental Affairs Edna Molewa called rhino poaching “a national priority crime.” In a statement, she said that more than 500 alleged poachers and traffickers were arrested in 2017, with the majority of arrests taking place inside or around Kruger National Park.

Charges filed in high-profile New Mexico trapping case

http://www.artesianews.com/1680131/charges-filed-in-high-profile-new-mexico-trapping-case.html

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico wildlife authorities say charges have been filed in a trapping case that is fueling this year’s debate among lawmakers over whether the practice should be banned on public lands.

The state Game and Fish Department announced Wednesday that while Marty Cordova had a valid license, he’s accused of running illegal trap lines that resulted in the unlawful harvest of wildlife and the death of a dog named Roxy.

The legislation named after Roxy is pending in the House. It’s sponsored by three Democrats from northern New Mexico.

Conservation officers served a search warrant at Cordova’s home in January and seized snares and foot-hold traps that weren’t properly marked. They also found bobcat pelts and skulls as well as fox, badger and ringtail pelts.

It wasn’t immediately clear if the 42-year-old Chimayo man had a lawyer.

Upstate NY man faces 3 charges after shooting a bald eagle over deer carcasses

https://www.newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/2018/12/upstate_ny_man_faces_3_charges_after_shooting_a_bald_eagle_over_deer_carcasses.html

A mature bald eagle up close and personal on the western shore of Owasco Lake.
A mature bald eagle up close and personal on the western shore of Owasco Lake. (Paul Pflanz)
4
8.3kshares

A Tompkins County man has been charged with three violations of state Environmental Conservation Law after he shot an adult bald eagle Saturday, using deer carcasses as bait.

The DEC said Donald N. Mix, of Caroline, N.Y. shot the protected bird in the Town of Caroline. Bald eagles are listed as a “threatened species” in New York.

According to the DEC, Environmental Conservation Officer Ozzie Eisenberg responded to a complaint Saturday from a town resident who “who heard a shot and then spotted a large bird round in a nearby field.”

The conservation officer found a dead adult bald eagle at the scene, and “a subsequent interview with a neighbor revealed that the man had placed deer carcasses in the field to shoot coyotes and turkey vultures, another protected species.” It is legal to shoot coyotes over bait. Read more about hunting coyotes.

According to the complainant, the neighbor found the eagle “still breathing slowly,” and was with the bird as it died while she awaited the DEC officer’s arrival.

The DEC said Mix “thought the bird was a turkey vulture and was unaware that he had killed a threatened bald eagle.”

The man is due to return to Town of Caroline Court on Jan. 22.

According to the DEC, Mix faces the following charges and penalties: 

Illegal taking of protected wildlife ECL 11-0107 (1) – “No person shall, at any time of the year, pursue, take, wound or kill in any manner, number or quantity, any fish protected by law, game, protected wildlife, shellfish, harbor seals, crustacea protected by law, or protected insects, except as permitted by the Fish and Wildlife Law.”

The fines and punishment can range from up to $250 and up to 15 days in jail or both.

Illegal taking of wild birds ECL 11-0901 (9) – “No protected wild bird for which no open season is established by law or fixed by regulation shall be taken.”

The fines and punishment can range from up to $250 and up to 15 days in jail or both.

Illegal taking of a bald eagle ECL 11-0537 –  “It shall be unlawful to knowingly or with wanton disregard for the consequences of this act to take, possess, sell, purchase, barter, offer to sell, purchase or barter, transport, export or import, at any time or in any manner, any bald eagle commonly known as the American eagle, or any golden eagle, alive or dead, or any part, nest, or egg thereof of the foregoing eagles without a permit from a lawful authority. ”

The fines and punishment can range from, in the case of a first violation, up to $5,000 and up to 90 days in jail or both.

For more Upstate New York outdoors on Facebook, go to Upstate NY Outdoors on NYup.com. We’d appreciate a “like.”

Bowhunters on Binghamton University campus can kill up to 50 deer in 'controlled hunt'

Bowhunters on Binghamton University campus can kill up to 50 deer in ‘controlled hunt’

The entrances and exits of the school’s Nature Preserve will be cordoned off to stop anyone from entering the area during the “controlled hunt.”

Question to deer hunters: Could you -- should you shoot a coyote?

Question to deer hunters: Could you — should you shoot a coyote?

“They bring out more hatred and passion in us than any other animal species,” Frair said.

Ranger trying to save rhinos shot, killed by poachers

https://www.sfgate.com/world/article/Poachers-kill-ranger-rhinos-Kruger-South-Africa-13092039.php

Published FILE - A South African ranger searches from a helicopter for a poacher on the run in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Photo: James Oatway/Sunday Times/Getty Images / 2014 Gallo Images (PTY) LTD

A game ranger was killed in a shootout Thursday with rhino poachers he had been trailing, South African National Parks officials said.

The 34-year-old ranger was a member of a unit that had been tracking a gang of poachers with dogs in the Kruger National Park, according to multiple reports. When the rangers confronted the gang, the poachers opened fire.

In the exchange of gunfire, the ranger was shot in the upper body while still in his vehicle.

RELATED: Rhino poachers eaten alive by lions

First aid was administered and a doctor flown in, but although he was stabilized at the the scene, the ranger died en route to a hospital, Kruger National Park spokesperson Ike Phaahla told News24.

The poachers got away, but  they apparently were unable to kill any animals as there were no carcasses in the vicinity, the South African reported.

A police investigation is underway.

New Study Reveals There Maybe Twice as Many Gorillas Than Previously Thought A new study in the journal ‘Science Advances’ says there may be almost 361,900 in western Africa, up from earlier estimates of 150,000-250,000. According to The Guardian, despite the results from the decade-long survey, gorillas remain a critically endangered species. The population of gorillas across Africa have declined as a result of disease, deforestation and poaching. Gorillas reach maturity after 11 or 12 years and only give birth every four years, meaning it will take time for the population to rebuild. Prof. Fiona Maisels, from the Wildlife Conservation Society, to The Guardian

Media: Wibbitz

The ranger’s identity was withheld pending notification of kin.

MORE: Only the poacher’s head was left

“We have lost a patriot who died on duty protecting South African assets and who was well trained to defend himself, hence our shock on learning of this incident,” parks CEO Fundisile Mketeni said. “We will draw strength from his contribution to the anti-poaching campaign and as his colleagues, we are going to continue where he left off in honor of his memory.”

Hunter charged with federal crimes for allegedly leading illegal elephant hunts

A South African man is facing federal charges for his role in allegedly helping a Colorado hunter illegally kill endangered elephants in Zimbabwe and offering similar services to an undercover federal agent, according to an indictment unsealed Monday in Denver.

Professional hunter Hanno van Rensburg, 44, of South Africa is facing charges of conspiracy, wire fraud and violations of the Lacey Act and Endangered Species Act, which prohibit the hunting and trade of threatened animals, including the African elephant, according to the indictment filed by the U.S. Attorney in Colorado. A warrant has been issued for van Rensburg’s arrest.

Federal prosecutors allege that in 2015, van Rensburg was paid $39,195 to help a Colorado hunter shoot an elephant outside of Zimbabwe’s Gonarezhou National Park. Van Rensburg and the Colorado hunter — who is not named in the indictment — tracked the wounded animal inside the park, the indictment states.

Van Rensburg and the Colorado hunter, according to the indictment, “agreed to pay and paid a bribe to the game scouts of between $5,000 and $8,000 so that they could shoot elephants other than the one that was first shot and wounded and kill an elephant inside Gonarezhou National Park, in violation of the Zimbabwe Parks and Wild Life Act.”

The indictment alleges that to export the elephant’s ivory, Van Rensburg conspired to tell Zimbabwean authorities that his client, the hunter from Colorado, was actually from South Africa.

“To conceal this contrivance, van Rensburg quizzed Colorado hunter on the layout of his house so that Colorado hunter could convincingly answer such questions and successfully represent himself as a South African resident,” according to the indictment.

Federal authorities also allege van Rensburg attempted to sell a similar illegal elephant hunting trip to an undercover agent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. According to the indictment, in 2017 van Rensburg told the agent to bring around $9,000 dollars on the trip for “extras,” as in bribes.

Hunters are required to buy “tags” if they want to hunt an elephant in Zimbabwe, and van Rensburg allegedly reassured the agent that a limited number of tags was not a problem.

“But you know about Zimbabwe, how it works,” van Rensburg allegedly told the agent, according to the indictment. “If they need another tag, they get another tag. You know, that’s the negative part of it. The system is so corrupt. If they need to get it, they will get it. If the client pays the money they will find another tag. I am straightforward with you. Corruption is the rule in Africa.”

Van Rensburg did not immediately respond to requests for comment, but one of his former clients is coming to his defense.

Charlie Loan, a hunter who is unrelated to the current case, said the indictment comes as a surprise. Loan said he was part of a small group that hired Van Rensburg and his guides for a 10-day South African hunting safari in 2012.

“One of the things that we were all really impressed by was the fact that they put a lot of emphasis on conservation,” Loan told ABC News. “Conservation was key in his mind, and that went through his entire staff.”

Bollywood star jailed for hunting endangered species

 

Bollhttps://www.cbsnews.com/news/salman-khan-blackbuck-hunting-bollywood-star-prison-sentence-endangered-species/ywood actor Salman Khan (2nd L) arrives at a court in Jodhpur in the western state of Rajasthan, India, April 5, 2018.

 REUTERS

NEW DELHI — Bollywood star Salman Khan was convicted Thursday of poaching rare deer in a wildlife preserve two decades ago and sentenced to five years in prison. The busy actor contends he did not shoot the two blackbuck deer in the western India preserve in 1998 and was acquitted in related cases.

He was in court for the ruling in the western city of Jodhpur on Thursday. He is expected to be taken to a local prison while it could take days for his attorneys to appeal the conviction and seek bail.

Four other stars also accused in the case — Saif Ali Khan, Sonali Bendre, Tabu and Neelam — were acquitted by Chief Judicial Magistrate Dev Kumar Khatri. They were in the jeep that Salman Khan was believed to be driving during the hunt. Tabu and Neelam both use just one name.

Khan had been sentenced to prison terms of between one and five years in related cases before being acquitted by appeals courts for lack of evidence.

salman khan

Bollywood actor Salman Khan is seen in a June 9, 2007 file photo.

 GETTY

The blackbuck is an endangered species protected under the Indian Wildlife Act.

Khan has had other brushes with the law.

In 2014, the Mumbai High Court acquitted him in a drunken-driving, hit-and-run case.

The judges found that prosecutors had failed to prove charges of culpable homicide, in which they accused Khan of driving while intoxicated in 2002 and running over five men sleeping on a sidewalk, killing one of them.

The government of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, has challenged his acquittal in the Supreme Court.