A Forgotten Step in Saving African Wildlife: Protecting the Rangers

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/28/science/a-forgotten-step-in-saving-african-wildlife-protecting-the-rangers.html?_r=0

Calgary man banned from hunting, fined for importing Alaskan brown bear carcass

The Canadian Press

A Calgary man has been banned from hunting anywhere in the world for a year and fined thousands of dollars for illegally importing the carcass of an Alaskan brown bear.

READ MORE: Video of hunter killing Alberta bear with spear draws death threats, provincial ban coming

 Environment Canada says Jason John Clemett was found guilty in June and was ordered to pay $13,500 for violating the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act.
Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson

Wildlife Photography ©Jim Robertson

A Southeast Texas man must serve five years of federal probation for killing two endangered whooping cranes while hunting

BEAUMONT, Texas (AP) —

 Trey Joseph Frederick was sentenced Tuesday in Beaumont.

A magistrate also ordered the 19-year-old Beaumont man to pay nearly $26,000 in restitution, barred Frederick from owning or possession firearms or ammunition and prohibited him from hunting or fishing in the U.S.

Frederick, who in May pleaded guilty to violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, must also do 200 hours of community service.

A Texas game warden on Jan. 11 received calls about two whooping cranes shot. Officials say Frederick was hunting nearby.

The birds died about 115 miles west of Louisiana’s White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area, where dozens of whooping cranes have been released in efforts to create a self-sustaining flock.

Yukon hunters attacked by angry moose fined for wasting meat

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/moose-mcquesten-keenan-yukon-hunting-1.
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http://www.cbc.ca

A Whitehorse father and son must pay $5,000 to the Yukon Turn In Poachers
fund after they were sentenced for wasting the entire carcass of a cow moose
that attacked them.

By Vic Istchenko,
< http://www.cbc.ca/news/cbc-news-online-news-staff-list-1.1294364> CBC News
Posted: Oct 21, 2016 7:55 AM CT Last Updated: Oct 21, 2016 7:55 AM CT

A Whitehorse father and son must pay $5,000 to the Yukon Turn In Poachers
fund after they were sentenced for wasting the entire carcass of a cow moose
that attacked them.
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ivatives/16x9_620/whitehorse-courthouse-autumn.jpg>
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Father of 12-year-old big game trophy hunter Aryanna Gourdin is a convicted poacher

The father of a 12-year-old big game trophy hunter making headlines around the world is a convicted poacher.

Aryanna Gourdin and her father Eli sparked outrage after photos of her rejoicing over the carcass of a giraffe she shot dead were published.

He has been accused of “brainwashing” her and using her in a social media campaign to promote their bloodthirsty exploits in the name of conservation.

They appeared on ITV’s Good Morning Britain last week wearing “stand up to anti-hunter bullying” after the Mirror highlighted the issue in a front page story.

Eli has been convicted of “wanton destruction of protected wildlife” which he was found guilty of in 2010.

Giraffe girl
Aryanna Gourdin with a giraffe she has hunted

In Utah where they live the crime relates to illegally killing big game such as deer, elk, moose and bison.

He also has 15 other convictions related to protected wildlife for which he was jailed in 2000. These include eight counts of transporting and selling protected wildlife.

Dr Pieter Kat of the Charity Lion Aid, said: “Despite breaking conservation laws this man has the audacity to loudly proclaim that hunting is conservation.

Giraffe girl
Aryanna Gourdin poses next to one of her kills

More: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/father-12-year-old-big-8827114

Wildlife officials say poachers took some newborn wolf pups from their Idaho den and killed them

 http://www.dailyjournal.net/view/story/7d23663d79f14bc2a6692e04dbe75197/WA–Wolf-Pups-Poachers

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SPOKANE, Washington — Wildlife officials say poachers took some newborn wolf pups from their Idaho den and killed them.

The Spokesman-Review reports (http://bit.ly/29qfwzw) the pups were just a few weeks old.

Authorities believe poachers killed them sometime during the week of May 16 in the Idaho Panhandle National Forest. The den was near a heavily used recreation area.

Defenders of Wildlife regional representative Suzanne Asha Stone says it’s illegal to hunt the pups on public land, but some private land has a year-round hunting season with no age limits. Her organization has lobbied for changes to protect pups.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game says those regulations help landowners address wolf-livestock conflicts and wolves that get habituated to people.


Information from: The Spokesman-Review,http://www.spokesman.com

IDA-Africa Baby Gorilla Rescue!

Last week In Defense of Animals-Africa was asked by its Cameroon government partner, the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife (MINFOF), for help capturing a juvenile gorilla who was frequently eating from village farms. Farmers had been frightened by the gorilla, who did not seem to be afraid of them, and a young boy had broken his arm running away. IDA-Africa was not eager to take a free-living gorilla captive, but a team from its Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue drove four hours to meet the MINFOF representative for a collaborative investigation. The team feared that the gorilla’s mother and others in his group had been killed by poachers.
They soon realized that the sweet six-year-old gorilla was not only unafraid of humans, he was actually seeking their company. He must have been captured as a baby by poachers, raised among humans who bought him as a pet, and dumped or “set free” near the forest when he became unmanageable. But this little lonely boy couldn’t fend for himself in the forest and would have been killed had his visits to the farms continued. The team had no choice but to capture and transport him back to Sanaga-Yong for temporary care. Since Sanaga-Yong only provides long-term care for chimpanzees, the gorilla was transferred a few days later to Ape Action Africa’s Mefou Sanctuary.
Tragically, each year thousands of baby chimpanzees, gorillas and monkeys are stolen from Africa’s forests by bushmeat poachers seeking extra profit in the pet and zoo trades, and rarely can these orphans be returned to a free life in the forest. Forest sites that meet criteria for reintroduction are nonexistent in many countries, and while there are a few success stories, released great apes endure stress and suffer high mortality. In well run sanctuaries, like Sanaga-Yong and Mefou, these surviving victims of poaching can usually find friendship and some happiness among other rescued orphans, but what they’ve lost is irreplaceable. Along with their mothers’ love and carefree childhoods, their freedom to self-determine and eventually have families of their own is gone forever.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

IDA-Africa Annual Gala

Saturday, September 10th 2016 from 6-10pm

The University Club in Downtown Portland Oregon

Please join us for our Sixth Annual Gala to benefit the chimpanzees of Sanaga-Yong Rescue Center. The evening’s festivities will feature Dr. Sheri Speede with an update on our rescue and conservation efforts in Africa including forest protection, sustainable agriculture, our education program and of course, a heartwarming update on the chimpanzees of Sanaga-Yong Rescue! And… get a sneak peek at a BBC pilot featuring our adorable and adventurous chimpanzees!

Purchase Your Tickets Today!: https://app.etapestry.com/cart/InDefenseofAnimals-Africa/default/category.php?ref=1165.0.75650093

Burning Ivory to Spread the Message – Hard Hitting New Videos Released

http://www.all-creatures.org/articles/ar-burning-ivory.html

An Animal Rights Article from All-Creatures.org

FROM

Joyce Tischler, founder and general counsel, Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF) as posted on Animal Blawg
May 2016

On April 30, 2016, Kenya burned 105 tons of ivory, along with over one ton of rhino horns and the confiscated skins of thousands of other wild animals in a strong public statement of support and respect for its native wildlife.

It’s eerie to watch these videos and realize that each pair of tusks belonged to someone (not something) who was highly intelligent and social, and who lived in an intricate society where they form lifelong familial bonds, cooperate to solve problems and teach their children the essential skills needed to survive in the wild.

burning ivory
Image by Tim Gorski

African elephants are running out of time. Homo sapiens, a species that by most accounts is overpopulating the planet, is brutally killing elephants at the rate of 96 per day. By some estimates, African elephants will be extinct in approximately one decade. Every elephant death is disturbing and the thought of no more wild elephants is beyond comprehension. The inane reason we are killing them is to seize their tusks—ivory, a coveted product that is valued by humans more highly than live elephants. You may already know that. So, here’s some promising news.

ivory trinkets

On April 30, 2016, Kenya burned 105 tons of ivory, along with over one ton of rhino horns and the confiscated skins of thousands of other wild animals in a strong public statement of support and respect for its native wildlife. This burning has been captured on video by Tim Gorski, a documentary filmmaker who is currently working on the elephant issue.

burning ivory
Image by Tim Gorski

It’s eerie to watch these videos and realize that each pair of tusks belonged to someone (not something) who was highly intelligent and social, and who lived in an intricate society where they form lifelong familial bonds, cooperate to solve problems and teach their children the essential skills needed to survive in the wild. Elephants are one of the most extraordinary species ever to grace this planet; they deserve no less than to be allowed to live out their natural lives with their herds in their homelands.

Please take a look at one or more of the videos, and listen to the powerful words of those fighting on the ground to protect elephants:

Kenya Ivory Burn 2016
Visit Tim Gorski’s Facebook page
Visit Tim’s website, Rattle The Cage Productions

And, when you’re done, please learn more about the issue; get involved. Stop the slaughter.

Stiffer penalties needed for poaching wolves

http://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/stiffer-penalties-needed-for-poaching-wolves/

Poaching may be limiting progress toward wolf recovery goals.

WOLVES are important native predators and vital pieces of our wildlife heritage. The news [“Four new wolf packs recorded in state,” Local News, March 14] that Washington is now home to at least 90 wolves, 18 packs and eight breeding pairs is exciting.

However, eight years after wolves were first confirmed back in the North Cascades, there are only three wolf packs in that designated recovery area. There remain no confirmed wolf packs in the Cascades south of Interstate 90 or in Western Washington. In order to meet wolf-recovery goals agreed upon under the Washington Wolf Conservation and Management Plan (Wolf Plan), and for the long term viability of the species in our state, it’s important that wolves recolonize the high-quality habitat in the Olympic Peninsula and Washington’s South Cascades.

Wolves are protected by both state and federal endangered-species laws in Washington. Yet wolf poaching has occurred with tragic frequency in recent years. Several members of the Methow Valley’s Lookout Pack were poached in 2010. A wolf from the Smackout Pack was poached in late 2013. The 2014 poaching of a Kittitas County breeding female wolf is still unprosecuted. In September 2015, shamefully minimal fines were announced for a Whitman County wolf poacher. Also in 2015, investigators announced that a lone wolf killed by a vehicle on I-90 west of Snoqualmie Pass had previously been shot. Numerous other unconfirmed rumors of wolf poaching reach us each year, and some are most certainly true.

It doesn’t matter whether it’s a bull elk or a wolf, poaching is never acceptable.

Sea Shepherd Intercepts Fleet of Illegal Fishing Vessels in the Indian Ocean – High Seas Pursuit Now Underway. .

– High Seas Pursuit Now Underway.

The Sea Shepherd ship, under the command of Captain Siddharth Chakravarty, has now engaged in a pursuit of on…Show more

Sea Shepherd Global - Sea Shepherd Intercepts Fleet of Illegal Fishing Vessels in the Indian Ocean preview image

Sea Shepherd Global – Sea Shepherd Intercepts Fleet of Illegal Fishing Vessels in the Indian Ocean

High Seas Pursuit Now Underway The Fu Yuan Yu 076, currently on the run from the Steve Irwin. Photo: Tim Watters Sea Shepherd’s