Save Andy the Polar Bear

Jill Kjonso
Fort Lauderdale, FL
129,761

Supporters

A polar bear named Andy is in trouble, and he needs our help. When he was not yet full-grown, Andy was fitted with a tracking collar by researchers. As he has grown, the collar has malfunctioned — it stopped transmitting a signal, and, last month, a photographer captured a photo of Andy with evident trauma around his neck from the extremely tight collar with a  release mechanism that has clearly failed. Andy’s life is at risk.

US and Canadian authorities were alerted to Andy’s situation, but so far no one is taking action or claiming responsibility for the collaring. Evidence suggests that it was likely the University of Alberta that placed the collar on Andy, yet all they have said in response to recent public pressure to help him is “options to find the bear are being examined.”

Time is running out, and we need to take real action. We are calling on the University of Alberta to immediately institute an active search for Andy, so they can remove the collar and provide all necessary treatment to ensure his well-being.

Locals in the area of Alaska where Andy was last seen have complained about polar bears with too-tight collars for years. Complications from collaring occur far too often, as the collaring process involves stressful chases, harmful sedation, and sometimes causes death. Collaring of polar bears is invasive and dangerous and there are simply far too few of this majestic species left to play with their lives.

It is true that Andy is just one polar bear, and scientists may see his plight as “collateral damage” in the interest of research for the good of all polar bears. But there is no justification for his strangulation, and research institutes that endeavor to capture and collar threatened species must be held responsible for their health and well-being.

In the meantime, the University of Alberta must use their resources to track Andy, remove the collar, and get him the medical attention he needs. Adding your voice to this petition will let them know that we are holding them accountable for Andy’s well-being, and that we will accept nothing short of immediate action.

If you would like to voice your concern for Andy, please contact the Executive Director of the Research and Ethics Office, Susan Babcock and Professor Andrew Derocher:                        susan.babcock@ualberta.ca                                        derocher@ualberta.ca

 

Letter to
University of Alberta
Andrew Derocher
Read more 

</a></div></div>” data-tolerance=”20″ data-_block=”A polar bear named Andy is in trouble, and he needs our help. When he was not yet full-grown, Andy was fitted with a tracking collar by researchers. As he has grown, the collar has malfunctioned — it stopped transmitting a signal, and, last month, a photographer captured a photo of Andy with evident trauma around his neck from the extremely tight collar with a release mechanism that has clearly failed. Andy’s life is at risk.<br />US and Canadian authorities were alerted to Andy’s situation, but so far no one is taking action or claiming responsibility for the collaring. Evidence suggests that it was likely the University of Alberta that placed the collar on Andy, yet all they have said in response to recent public pressure to help him is “options to find the bear are being examined.” <br />Time is running out, and we need to take real action. We are calling on the University of Alberta to immediately institute an active search for Andy, so they can remove the collar and provide all necessary treatment to ensure his well-being.<br />Locals in the area of Alaska where Andy was last seen have complained about polar bears with too-tight collars for years. Complications from collaring occur far too often, as the collaring process involves stressful chases, harmful sedation, and sometimes causes death. Collaring of polar bears should only be done when absolutely necessary, as it is invasive and dangerous, and there are simply far too few of this majestic species left to play with their lives. <br />It is true that Andy is just one polar bear, and scientists may see his plight as “collateral damage” in the interest of research for the good of all polar bears. But there is no justification for his strangulation, and research institutes that endeavor to capture and collar threatened species must be held responsible for their health and well-being.<br />In the meantime, the University of Alberta must use their resources to track Andy, remove the collar, and get him the medical attention he needs. Adding your voice to this petition will let them know that we are holding them accountable for Andy’s well-being, and that we will accept nothing short of immediate action.”>A polar bear named Andy is in trouble, and he needs our help. When he was not yet full-grown, Andy was fitted with a tracking collar by researchers. As he has grown, the collar has malfunctioned — it stopped transmitting a signal, and, last month, a photographer captured a photo of Andy with evident

Read more 

 https://www.change.org/p/university-of-alberta-save-andy-the-polar-bear?recruiter=58625131&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=autopublish&utm_term=des-md-action_alert-no_msg&fb_ref=Default

6 thoughts on “Save Andy the Polar Bear

  1. I wrote the following e-mail to both address

    Dear sirs and ladies,

    I saw a petition about the polar bear Andy wearing a collar which is suffocating him.
    Since this isn’t the first time such things are happening, I’m wondering if there is any possibility to avoid sufferance and death of these poor animals.
    I’m asking you at the University of Alberta if you can use your resources to track Andy, remove the collar and get him the medical attention he needs ensuring his well-being. You shall institute an active search as soon as possible
    since time is running out… only if you act immediately you may save his life!

    Thank you from the bottom of our heart.

    Claudine, Massimo, Emanuele Giosuè and Sara Luna
    Giovannoni Mobiglia
    Brione sopra Minusio
    Switzerland

  2. Pingback: Save Andy the Polar Bear | Claudine Giovannoni

  3. The people who are responsible for using the tracking collar should be responsible for doing it right and/or getting it off. If they won’t step up, people from other agencies should. There is just not enough accountability when it comes to harming animals.

  4. This is too much. I don’t like the laissez-faire response to this either. That kind of attitude would be one thing, if they hadn’t put the freaking thing on this poor animal to begin with! Somebody needs to take care of this like yesterday! Or will they give us that ‘we’re saving the species, not individual animals’ spiel again? It makes the agencies responsible for the welfare of wildlife look cruel and indifferent, and not much better than hunters and trappers, quite frankly. Not what one would expect.

  5. I’m thinking that the agencies responsible for the welfare of wildlife are indifferent. Most of them are merely managing living resources for the maximum benefit of people. Until deer, elk, and bears can come up with enough money to equal what hunters pay for licenses and thus contribute to fish and wildlife paychecks, they won’t have any say.

    The people who really speak up for the animals (like Officer Casavant who wouldn’t kill the bear cubs) often end up in trouble with their superiors and their bureaucracies.

  6. This was sent out in November, and we all signed the petition. SO WHAT HAS BEEN DONE ABOUT THIS??? NOTHING??? THIS IS OUTRAGEOUS. The person who put this
    collar on this bear should be brought to justice for this cruel and irresponsible conduct.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s